Grey Lynn (New Zealand electorate)

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Grey Lynn is a former New Zealand parliamentary electorate, in the city of Auckland. It existed from 1902 to 1978, and was represented by nine Members of Parliament.

Population centres[edit]

The Representation Act 1900 had increased the membership of the House of Representatives from general electorates 70 to 76, and this was implemented through the 1902 electoral redistribution. In 1902, changes to the country quota affected the three-member electorates in the four main centres. The tolerance between electorates was increased to ±1,250 so that the Representation Commissions (since 1896, there had been separate commissions for the North and South Islands) could take greater account of communities of interest. These changes proved very disruptive to existing boundaries, and six electorates were established for the first time, including Grey Lynn, and two electorates that previously existed were re-established.[1]

In the 1902 election, the electorate was classed as a mix of rural and urban (with a two to one ratio), and comprised areas just west of the central part of Auckland.[2] In the 1907 electoral redistribution, the electorate was classed as fully urban, and the country quota thus no longer applied.[3]

History[edit]

The electorate existed from 1902 to 1978.[4] George Fowlds of the Liberal Party was the electorate's first representative.[5] He served for three terms as was beaten in the 1911 election by the independent left-wing politician John Payne.[6][7]

Grey Lynn was held from the 1919 election by Labour's Fred Bartram until he was defeated in 1928 by John Fletcher of the United Party.[8] During 1930, Fletcher became an Independent.[9] There was disagreement in the Labour Party regarding the nomination for the 1931 election, with John A. Lee chosen over their previous representative Fred Bartram, resulting in the latter to stand as an Independent.[10][11] Four candidates stood in total, with Lee defeating the incumbent.[12]

Members of Parliament[edit]

The electorate was represented by nine Members of Parliament.[4]

Key

 Liberal    Independent    Labour    United    Democratic Labour  

Election Winner
1902 election George Fowlds
1905 election
1908 election
1911 election John Payne
1914 election
1919 election Fred Bartram
1922 election
1925 election
1928 election John Fletcher[nb 1]
1931 election John A. Lee
1935 election
1938 election
1943 election Fred Hackett
1946 election
1949 election
1951 election
1954 election
1957 election
1960 election
1963 by-election Reginald Keeling
1963 election Ritchie Macdonald
1966 election
1969 election Eddie Isbey
1972 election
1975 election
(Electorate abolished 1978)

Table footnotes:

  1. ^ John Fletcher became an Independent during 1930.[9]

Election results[edit]

1931 election[edit]

General election, 1931: Grey Lynn[12][13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour John A. Lee 6,767 57.78
Independent John Fletcher 3,525 30.10
United Walter Harry Murray 1,037 8.85
Independent Fred Bartram 382 3.26
Majority 3,242 27.68
Informal votes 104 0.88
Turnout 11,815 83.26
Registered electors 14,190

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ McRobie 1989, pp. 67f.
  2. ^ McRobie 1989, pp. 66f.
  3. ^ McRobie 1989, p. 71.
  4. ^ a b Wilson 1985, p. 264.
  5. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 197.
  6. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 197, 226.
  7. ^ Gustafson 1980, p. 164.
  8. ^ Wilson 1985, pp. 182, 197.
  9. ^ a b "State of Parties". Auckland Star LXII (5). 7 January 1931. p. 3. Retrieved 31 October 2014. 
  10. ^ "General Election". Auckland Star LXII (159). 8 July 1931. p. 5. Retrieved 31 October 2014. 
  11. ^ "Labour's Choice". The New Zealand Herald. LXVIII (20774). 17 January 1931. p. 12. Retrieved 31 October 2014. 
  12. ^ a b The General Election, 1931. Government Printer. 1932. p. 2. Retrieved 2 November 2014. 
  13. ^ "Election Counts". Auckland Star LXII (291). 9 December 1931. p. 9. Retrieved 28 October 2014. 

References[edit]

  • Gustafson, Barry (1980). Labour's path to political independence: The Origins and Establishment of the New Zealand Labour Party, 1900–19. Auckland, New Zealand: Auckland University Press. ISBN 0-19-647986-X. 
  • McRobie, Alan (1989). Electoral Atlas of New Zealand. Wellington: GP Books. ISBN 0-477-01384-8. 
  • Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First published in 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. OCLC 154283103.