List of Japanese Nobel laureates

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Since 1949, there have been twenty-two Japanese (or Japanese born) winners of the Nobel Prize (Swedish: Nobelpriset). The Nobel Prize is a Sweden-based international monetary prize. The award was established by the 1895 will and estate of Swedish chemist and inventor Alfred Nobel. It was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. An associated prize, The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, was instituted by Sweden's central bank in 1968 and first awarded in 1969.

The Nobel Prizes in the specific disciplines (physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, and literature) and the Prize in Economics, which is commonly identified with them, are widely regarded as the most prestigious award one can receive in those fields.[1][2] Of Japanese winners, ten have been physicists, seven chemists, two for literature, two for physiology or medicine and one for efforts towards peace.[2]

Year Laureate Nobel Prize Life Alma Mater Notes
2014 Isamu Akasaki Physics 1929– Kyoto University "for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources"
2014 Hiroshi Amano Physics 1960– Nagoya University "for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources"
2014 Shuji Nakamura
(USA citizen)
Physics 1954– University of Tokushima "for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources"
2012 Shinya yamanaka10.jpg Shinya Yamanaka Physiology or Medicine 1962– Kobe University "for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent" shared with John B. Gurdon
2010 Nobel Prize 2010-Press Conference KVA-DSC 7370.jpg Akira Suzuki Chemistry 1930– Hokkaido University "for palladium-catalyzed cross couplings in organic synthesis" shared with Richard F. Heck and Ei-ichi Negishi
2010 Nobel Prize 2010-Press Conference KVA-DSC 7397.jpg Ei-ichi Negishi Chemistry 1935– University of Tokyo "for palladium-catalyzed cross couplings in organic synthesis" shared with Richard F. Heck and Akira Suzuki
2008 Osamu Shimomura-press conference Dec 06th, 2008-2.jpg Osamu Shimomura Chemistry 1928– Nagasaki University "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP" – shared with Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien, held American nationality.[3]
2008 Makoto Kobayashi-press conference Dec 07th, 2008-2b.jpg Makoto Kobayashi Physics 1944– Nagoya University "for the discovery of the origin of the broken symmetry which predicts the existence of at least three families of quarks in nature" – shared with Yoichiro Nambu and Toshihide Maskawa.[4]
2008 Toshihide Masukawa-press conference Dec 07th, 2008-2.jpg Toshihide Maskawa Physics 1940– Nagoya University "for the discovery of the origin of the broken symmetry which predicts the existence of at least three families of quarks in nature" – shared with Yoichiro Nambu and Makoto Kobayashi.[4]
2008 YoichiroNambu.jpg Yoichiro Nambu
(USA citizen)
Physics 1921– Tokyo Imperial University "for the discovery of the mechanism of spontaneous broken symmetry in subatomic physics" – held American nationality, shared with Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa.[4]
2002 Masatoshi Koshiba Physics 1926– University of Tokyo "for pioneering contributions to astrophysics, in particular for the detection of cosmic neutrinos" – shared with Raymond David Jr and Riccardo Giacconi.[5]
2002 Koichi Tanaka Chemistry 1959– Tohoku University "for the development of methods for identification and structure analyses of biological macromolecules" and "for their development of soft desorption ionisation methods for mass spectrometric analyses of biological macromolecules" – shared with John Fenn and Kurt Wüthrich.[6]
2001 Noyori small.jpg Ryōji Noyori Chemistry 1938– Kyoto University "for their work on chirally catalysed hydrogenation reactions" – shared with William Knowles and Barry Sharpless.[7]
2000 Hideki Shirakawa Chemistry 1936– Tokyo Institute of Technology "for the discovery and development of conductive polymers" – shared with Alan MacDiarmid and Alan Heeger.[8]
1994 Oe Kenzaburo 1-2.jpg Kenzaburō Ōe Literature 1935– University of Tokyo "who with poetic force creates an imagined world, where life and myth condense to form a disconcerting picture of the human predicament today."[9]
1987 Susumu-Tonegawa.png Susumu Tonegawa Physiology or Medicine 1939– Kyoto University, University of California, San Diego "for his discovery of the genetic principle for generation of antibody diversity."[10]
1981 Kenichi Fukui Chemistry 1918–1998 Kyoto Imperial University "for their theories, developed independently, concerning the course of chemical reactions" – shared with Roald Hoffmann.[11]
1974 Satō Eisaku.jpg Eisaku Satō Peace 1901–1975 Tokyo Imperial University Shared with Seán MacBride.[12]
1973 Leo Esaki Physics 1925– Tokyo Imperial University "for their experimental discoveries regarding tunneling phenomena in semiconductors and superconductors, respectively" – shared with Ivar Giaever and Brian David Josephson.
1968 Yasunari Kawabata 1938.jpg Yasunari Kawabata Literature 1899–1972 Tokyo Imperial University "for his narrative mastery, which with great sensibility expresses the essence of the Japanese mind" – .[13]
1965 Tomonaga.jpg Sin-Itiro Tomonaga Physics 1906–1979 Kyoto Imperial University "for their fundamental work in quantum electrodynamics, with deep-ploughing consequences for the physics of elementary particles" – shared with Julian Schwinger and Richard Feynman.[14]
1949 Yukawa.jpg Hideki Yukawa Physics 1907–1981 Kyoto Imperial University "for his prediction of the existence of mesons on the basis of theoretical work on nuclear forces"[15]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Nobel Prize". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  2. ^ a b "All Nobel Laureates". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  3. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2008". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  4. ^ a b c "The Nobel Prize in Physics 2008". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  5. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 2002". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  6. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2002". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  7. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2001". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  8. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2000". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  9. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Literature 1994". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  10. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1987". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  11. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1981". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  12. ^ "The Nobel Peace Prize 1974". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  13. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Literature 1968". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  14. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1965". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  15. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1949". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 

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