Shirtdress

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A vintage shirtdress, late 1960s-early 1970s.
A 1950s vintage "shirtwaist" dress.

A shirtdress is a style of dress which borrows details from a man's shirt. These can include a collar, a button front, or cuffed sleeves. Often, these dresses are made up in crisp fabrics like cotton or silk, much like a men's dress shirt would be. As they are typically cut without a seam at the waist, these dresses often have a looser fit, usually relying on a belt to define the waist. Button fronts and a forgiving fit make this a flattering look for most body types.

History[edit]

Shirt dresses were sometimes called "shirtwaist dresses" when they first became fashionable during the 1950s. The 1950s version of the shirtdress was launched as part of Christian Dior's post-World War II "New Look" couture designs, with a full skirt held up by wearing a crinoline.[1] They often featured a notched collar, and elbow-length sleeves with cuffs. More informal versions of the shirtdress, made of cotton, but retaining the full skirt and collar, became a staple part of many women's wardrobes during the 1950s, with designers such as Anne Fogarty becoming known for their versions of this style.[2] A 1957 issue of Life magazine includes a photo of a typical cotton shirtdress selling for $25 in New York City.[3]

A variation of the original shirtdress is the "T-shirt dress". T-Shirt dresses began being produced in the 1960s, and are simply an elongated version of a T-shirt.[4]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hewitt, Valerie; Ann Kellogg; and Lynn Payne (2008). The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Clothing Through American History, 1900 to the Present: Volume 1, 1900-1949. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 311. ISBN 978-0-313-33395-8. 
  2. ^ Popular Shirt Dress Combines Tailored Top with Ruffly Skirt, Reading Eagle - Jun 30, 1954, page 26
  3. ^ Published by Time Inc, Vol. 42, No. 10 ISSN 0024-3019 (11 Mar 1957). "Fashion: A Spree on 7th Avenue". Life. p. 112. 
  4. ^ Cumming, Valerie; C.W. Cunnington; and P.E. Cunnington (2010). The Dictionary of Fashion History. Berg Publishers. p. 211. ISBN 978-1-84788-534-0.