2008 Summer Olympics medal table

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Map of the world showing the achievements of each country during the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, People's Republic of China.
Gold for countries achieving at least one gold medal.
Silver for countries achieving at least one silver medal.
Brown for countries achieving at least one bronze medal.
Green for countries that did not win a medal.
Black for countries that did not participate.
A yellow square displays the host city (Beijing).
Blue asterisks display countries achieving their first medal ever in a Summer Olympics.

The 2008 Summer Olympics medal table is a list of National Olympic Committees (NOCs) ranked by the number of gold medals won by their athletes during the 2008 Summer Olympics, held in Beijing, the capital of the People's Republic of China, from 8 August to 24 August 2008. Approximately 11,028 athletes from 204 NOCs participated in 302 events in 28 sports.[1]

Athletes from 87 countries won medals, leaving 115 countries without a medal, and 54 of them won at least one gold medal. Both of these categories set new records until surpassed in 2016. Athletes from China won the most gold medals, with 48 gold medals. Athletes from the United States won the most total medals, with 110. Afghanistan,[2] Mauritius,[3] Sudan,[4] Tajikistan[5] and Togo[6] won their first Olympic medals. Athletes from Mongolia (which previously held the record for most medals without a gold)[7] and Panama[8] won their first gold medals. Serbian swimmer Milorad Čavić won the first medal for the country as an independent NOC. Serbian athletes have previously won medals as nationals of Yugoslavia and Serbia and Montenegro.[9] Samoa won its first Olympic medal due to medals reallocation after 2016 wave of doping samples retesting.

Medal table[edit]

The ranking in this table is based on information provided by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and is consistent with IOC convention in its published medal tables. By default, the table is ordered by the number of gold medals the athletes from a nation have won (in this context, a "nation" is an entity represented by a National Olympic Committee). The number of silver medals is taken into consideration next and then the number of bronze medals. If nations are still tied, equal ranking is given and they are listed alphabetically by IOC country code.

In boxing, judo, taekwondo and wrestling, two bronze medals are awarded in each weight class.[10] Therefore, the total number of bronze medals is greater than the total number of gold or silver medals. An exception was the men's 84 kg Greco-Roman wrestling, where Ara Abrahamian was stripped of his medal due to his conduct during the medal ceremony. Additionally there was a tie for the silver medal in the women's 100 metres in athletics and no bronze was awarded.[11] Ties for third in swimming's men's 100 metre backstroke and men's 100 metre freestyle meant that two bronze medals were awarded for those events.[12]

From left to right: Tore Brovold from Norway (silver), Vincent Hancock from USA (gold) and Anthony Terras from France (bronze) with the medals they earned in Men's skeet shooting
Maarten van der Weijden from the Netherlands won a gold medal in the men's 10 km Open Water.
Left to right: Lu Chunlong (gold), Dong Dong (bronze), both from China, and Jason Burnett from Canada (silver) won medals in gymnasticsMen's trampoline
Femke Dekker from the Netherlands won a silver medal in the Women's eights in rowing.
From left to right: Ryan Lochte (bronze), Michael Phelps (gold), both from USA, and László Cseh from Hungary (silver) show off the medals they earned from the men's 400 metre individual medley.
Ketleyn Quadros from Brazil won a bronze medal in women's 57 kg judo.
Emma Snowsill (left) and Emma Moffatt (right) from Australia show off their gold and bronze medals after the women's triathlon.
Key

  *   Host nation (China)

  ‡   Changes in medal standings (see below)

2008 Summer Olympics medal table
 Rank  NOC Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  China (CHN)*‡ 48 21 29 98
2  United States (USA) 36 39 36 111
3  Russia (RUS) 22 15 23 60
4  Great Britain (GBR) 19 13 15 47
5  Germany (GER) 16 10 15 41
6  Australia (AUS) 14 15 17 46
7  South Korea (KOR) 13 11 8 32
8  Japan (JPN) 9 7 9 25
9  Italy (ITA) 8 9 10 27
10  France (FRA) 7 16 19 42
11  Netherlands (NED) 7 5 4 16
12  Ukraine (UKR) 7 4 13 24
13  Kenya (KEN) 6 4 4 14
14  Spain (ESP) 5 10 4 19
15  Jamaica (JAM) 5 3 2 10
16  Poland (POL) 4 5 2 11
17  Romania (ROU) 4 1 4 9
18  Ethiopia (ETH) 4 1 2 7
19  Canada (CAN) 3 9 8 20
20  Hungary (HUN) 3 5 2 10
21  Norway (NOR) 3 5 1 9
22  Brazil (BRA) 3 4 10 17
23  Belarus (BLR) 3 4 6 13
24  Czech Republic (CZE) 3 3 1 7
25  New Zealand (NZL) 3 2 4 9
26  Georgia (GEO) 3 2 2 7
27  Slovakia (SVK) 3 2 1 6
28  Cuba (CUB) 2 10 15 27
29  Denmark (DEN) 2 2 3 7
30  North Korea (PRK) 2 2 2 6
31  Thailand (THA) 2 2 1 5
32  Mongolia (MGL) 2 2 0 4
33  Switzerland (SUI) 2 1 4 7
34  Argentina (ARG) 2 0 4 6
35  Mexico (MEX) 2 0 1 3
36  Belgium (BEL) 2 0 0 2
37  Kazakhstan (KAZ) 1 3 4 8
38  Turkey (TUR) 1 3 3 7
39  Zimbabwe (ZIM) 1 3 0 4
40  Slovenia (SLO) 1 2 2 5
41  Azerbaijan (AZE) 1 1 4 6
 Indonesia (INA) 1 1 4 6
43  Bulgaria (BUL) 1 1 3 5
 Uzbekistan (UZB) 1 1 3 5
45  Finland (FIN) 1 1 2 4
46  Latvia (LAT) 1 1 1 3
47  Dominican Republic (DOM) 1 1 0 2
 Estonia (EST) 1 1 0 2
 Portugal (POR) 1 1 0 2
 Trinidad and Tobago (TRI) 1 1 0 2
51  India (IND) 1 0 2 3
52  Iran (IRI) 1 0 1 2
53  Cameroon (CMR) 1 0 0 1
 Panama (PAN) 1 0 0 1
 Tunisia (TUN) 1 0 0 1
56  Sweden (SWE) 0 4 1 5
57  Lithuania (LTU) 0 3 2 5
58  Croatia (CRO) 0 2 3 5
 Nigeria (NGR) 0 2 3 5
60  Chinese Taipei (TPE) 0 2 2 4
61  Greece (GRE) 0 2 1 3
62  Armenia (ARM) 0 1 4 5
63  Austria (AUT) 0 1 2 3
 Colombia (COL) 0 1 2 3
 Ireland (IRL) 0 1 2 3
 Serbia (SRB) 0 1 2 3
67  Algeria (ALG) 0 1 1 2
 Bahamas (BAH) 0 1 1 2
 Kyrgyzstan (KGZ) 0 1 1 2
 Morocco (MAR) 0 1 1 2
 Tajikistan (TJK) 0 1 1 2
72  Chile (CHI) 0 1 0 1
 Ecuador (ECU) 0 1 0 1
 Iceland (ISL) 0 1 0 1
 Malaysia (MAS) 0 1 0 1
 Samoa (SAM) 0 1 0 1
 Singapore (SIN) 0 1 0 1
 South Africa (RSA) 0 1 0 1
 Sudan (SUD) 0 1 0 1
 Vietnam (VIE) 0 1 0 1
81  Afghanistan (AFG) 0 0 1 1
 Egypt (EGY) 0 0 1 1
 Israel (ISR) 0 0 1 1
 Mauritius (MRI) 0 0 1 1
 Moldova (MDA) 0 0 1 1
 Togo (TOG) 0 0 1 1
 Venezuela (VEN) 0 0 1 1
Total (87 NOCs) 298 299 347 944

Changes in medal standings[edit]

List of official changes[edit]

Tony André Hansen was stripped of his bronze medal when his horse tested positive for a banned substance.

Belarusian athletes Vadim Devyatovskiy and Ivan Tsikhan, who won silver and bronze respectively in the men's hammer throw, both tested positive for abnormal levels of testosterone. After attending a disciplinary hearing in September, they were stripped of their medals on December 11, 2008. Krisztián Pars of Hungary was given the silver medal, and Koji Murofushi of Japan was given the bronze.[13] However, both of the Belarusian athletes had their medals reinstated because the doping tests weren't handled properly.[14]

Ruling date Sport/Event NOC 1st, gold medalist(s) 2nd, silver medalist(s) 3rd, bronze medalist(s) Total Comment
List of official changes in medal standings (during the Games)
15 August 2008 Shooting
Men's 10 metre air pistol
 North Korea (PRK) −1 −1 On August 15, 2008, the International Olympic Committee announced North Korean shooter Kim Jong-su had tested positive for the banned substance propranolol and was stripped of his two medals. He had won a bronze medal in the 10 metre air pistol and silver in the 50 metre pistol. After Kim Jong-su was disqualified, the bronze medal in the 10 metre air pistol went to Jason Turner of the United States; in the 50 metre pistol, the silver medal went to Tan Zongliang of China, and the bronze medal to Vladimir Isakov of Russia.[15]
 United States (USA) +1 +1
Shooting
Men's 50 metre pistol
 North Korea (PRK) −1 −1
 China (CHN) +1 −1 0
 Russia (RUS) +1 +1
16 August 2008 Wrestling
Men's Greco-Roman 84 kg
 Sweden (SWE) −1 −1 Swedish wrestler Ara Abrahamian was originally awarded a bronze medal in the Greco-Roman 84 kg event. However, at the medal ceremony he walked off the podium and dropped his medal on the mat in protest of the judging in his event. On August 16, 2008, the International Olympic Committee decided to strip him of his medal because they felt it amounted to a political demonstration and was disrespectful to other athletes.[16]
22 August 2008 Athletics
Women's heptathlon
 Ukraine (UKR) −1 −1 Ukrainian athlete Lyudmyla Blonska, who finished second in the women's heptathlon, tested positive for the steroid methyltestosterone. On August 22, 2008, the International Olympic Committee officially stripped Blonska of her medal, and as a result, the silver medal went to Hyleas Fountain of the United States, and the bronze medal to Tatyana Chernova of Russia.[17]
 United States (USA) +1 −1 0
 Russia (RUS) +1 +1
List of official changes in medal standings (after the Games)
22 December 2008 Equestrian
Team jumping
 Norway (NOR) −1 −1 Norwegian equestrian athlete Tony André Hansen's horse tested positive for the pain relieving medication capsaicin, a banned substance. Hansen, who won a bronze medal in the team jumping event, was disqualified. In the team jumping system, the top three scores garnered by the four riders are counted. Hansen had the best score on his team, and it was removed from the total. Without Hansen's score, his team was below the bronze medal threshold so the medal was awarded to the team from Switzerland on December 22, 2008.[18]
 Switzerland (SUI) +1 +1
18 November 2009 Athletics
Men's 1500 metres
 Bahrain (BRN) −1 −1 On November 18, 2009, the IOC announced that two medalists had been stripped of their medals. First, Rashid Ramzi of Bahrain had been stripped of the gold medal in the men's 1500 m race. Ramzi had been the first athlete from Bahrain to win an Olympic gold medal. His frozen blood sample was re-tested and found to contain traces of Cera, a stamina-building blood-booster. Kenyan Asbel Kipruto Kiprop was upgraded to gold, Nicholas Willis of New Zealand was given the silver and Mehdi Baala of France received the bronze. Also, Italian cyclist Davide Rebellin had tested positive for Cera and had been stripped of the silver medal he earned in the men's road race.[19] The silver medal was later awarded to Fabian Cancellara of Switzerland (the original bronze medal recipient) and the bronze medal was awarded to Alexandr Kolobnev of Russia.[20][21]
 Kenya (KEN) +1 −1 0
 New Zealand (NZL) +1 −1 0
 France (FRA) +1 +1
Cycling
Men's road race
 Italy (ITA) −1 −1
 Switzerland (SUI) +1 −1 0
 Russia (RUS) +1 +1
20 August 2014 Athletics
Men's shot put
 Belarus (BLR) −1 −1 In 2012, IAAF announced that retested doping samples from the 2005 World Athletics Championships of shotputter Andrei Mikhnevich was found positive for 3 anabolic steroids: Clenbuterol, Methandienone and Oxandrolone. On 20 August 2014, IOC disqualified his results from the 2008 Summer Olympics and allocated the bronze medal.[22]
 Canada (CAN) +1 +1
List of official changes in medal standings (2016 wave of retesting)
22 July 2016 Weightlifting
Women's 48 kg
 Turkey (TUR) −1 −1 On 22 July 2016, Sibel Özkan (Turkey) was disqualified due to an anti-doping rule violation and stripped of her silver medal.[23]
The IOC has requested IWF to modify the results of the weightlifting events, and IWF has reallocated medals accordingly.[24]
 Chinese Taipei (TPE) +1 −1 0
 South Korea (KOR) +1 +1
16 August 2016 Athletics
Women's 4 × 100 metres relay
 Russia (RUS) −1 −1 On 16 August 2016, the Russian women's 4 × 100 metres relay team was disqualified for doping. Russian teammates were stripped of their gold Olympic medals, as Yuliya Chermoshanskaya had her samples reanalyzed and tested positive for two prohibited substances.[25]
The IOC has requested IAAF to modify the results accordingly and to consider any further action within its own competence.,[26] and medals were redistributed.[27]
 Belgium (BEL) +1 −1 0
 Nigeria (NGR) +1 −1 0
 Brazil (BRA) +1 +1
19 August 2016 Athletics
Women's 4 × 400 metres relay
 Russia (RUS) −1 −1 On 19 August 2016, the Russian women's 4 × 400 metres relay team was disqualified for doping.[28] Russian teammates were stripped of their silver Olympic medals, as Anastasiya Kapachinskaya had her samples reanalyzed and tested positive for the same two prohibited substances as Chermoshanskaya.[29] On 31 August 2016, the IOC separately disqualified Tatyana Firova, who finished second with teammates in the 4 × 400 m relay.
31 August 2016 Weightlifting
Men's 69 kg
 Armenia (ARM) −1 −1 On 31 August 2016, the IOC disqualified six sportspeople for failing doping tests at the 2008 Games. They included Russian weightlifter medalists Nadezhda Evstyukhina (bronze medal in the women's 75 kg event) and Marina Shainova (silver medal in the women's 58 kg event). Bronze medal weightlifter Tigran Martirosyan of Armenia (men's 69 kg event) and fellow weightlifters Alexandru Dudoglo (9th place) of Moldova and Intigam Zairov (9th place) of Azerbaijan were also disqualified.[30]
The IOC has requested IWF to modify the results of the weightlifting events, and IWF has reallocated medals accordingly.[24]
 Cuba (CUB) +1 +1
Weightlifting
Women's 75 kg
 Russia (RUS) −1 −1
 Spain (ESP) +1 +1
Weightlifting
Women's 58 kg
 Russia (RUS) −1 −1
 North Korea (PRK) +1 −1 0
 Thailand (THA) +1 +1
1 September 2016 Athletics
Women's discus throw
 Cuba (CUB) −1 −1 On 1 September 2016, the IOC disqualified a further two athletes. Cuban discus thrower Yarelys Barrios, who won a silver medal in the women's discus, was disqualified after testing positive for Acetazolamide and ordered to return her medal. Qatari sprinter Samuel Francis, who finished 16th in the 100 meters, was also disqualified after testing positive for Stanozolol.[31]
13 September 2016 Athletics
Women's javelin throw
 Russia (RUS) −1 −1 On 13 September 2016, four more Russian athletes were disqualified for doping offenses. Two of those were medalists from the 2008 Summer Olympics: silver medalist Mariya Abakumova in the women's javelin throw and Denis Alekseyev, who was part of the bronze medal team in the men's 4 × 400 m relay. Inga Abitova, who finished 6th in the 10,000 meters, and cyclist Ekaterina Gnidenko also tested positive for a banned substance and were disqualified.[32]
Athletics
Men's 4 × 400 m relay
 Russia (RUS) −1 −1
6 October 2016 Athletics
Women's high jump
 Russia (RUS) −1 −1 On 6 October 2016, the IOC disqualified Anna Chicherova of the Russian Federation for testing positive for performance-enhancing drugs. She won a bronze medal in the women's high jump. Russia would likely keep the bronze medal, as the fourth-place athlete in the competition was also from Russia.[33]
26 October 2016 Weightlifting
Men's 85 kg
 Belarus (BLR) −1 −1 On 26 October 2016, the IOC disqualified 9 more athletes for failing drugs tests at the 2008 games. Amongst them were 6 medal winners. Andrei Rybakou and Nastassia Novikava both from Belarus, Olha Korobka of Ukraine, Ekaterina Volkova of the Russian Federation, Soslan Tigiev of Uzbekistan and Taimuraz Tigiyev of Kazakhstan.[34]
The IOC has requested UWW to modify the results of the wrestling events, and UWW has reallocated medals accordingly.[35][36]
The IOC has requested IWF to modify the results of the weightlifting events, and IWF has reallocated medals accordingly.[24]
 Armenia (ARM) +1 −1 0
 Cuba (CUB) +1 +1
Weightlifting
Women's 53 kg
 Belarus (BLR) −1 −1
 Indonesia (INA) +1 +1
Weightlifting
Women's +75 kg
 Ukraine (UKR) −1 −1
 Samoa (SAM) +1 +1
Athletics
Women's 3000 metres steeplechase
 Russia (RUS) −1 −1
Wrestling
Men's freestyle 74 kg
 Uzbekistan (UZB) −1 −1
 Belarus (BLR) +1 −1 0
 Romania (ROU) +1 +1
Wrestling
Men's freestyle 96 kg
 Kazakhstan (KAZ) −1 −1
 Georgia (GEO) +1 −1 0
 Cuba (CUB) +1 +1
17 November 2016 Weightlifting
Men's 94 kg
 Russia (RUS) −1 −1 On 17 November 2016, the IOC disqualified 16 more athletes for failing drugs tests at the 2008 games. Amongst them were 10 medal winners. Khadzhimurat Akkayev, Khasan Baroyev and Dmitry Lapikov from the Russian Federation, Mariya Grabovetskaya, Asset Mambetov and Irina Nekrassova from Kazakhstan, Nataliya Davydova, Denys Yurchenko both from Ukraine, Hrysopiyí Devetzí of Greece and Vitaliy Rahimov of Azerbaijan.[37]
The IOC has requested UWW to modify the results of the wrestling events, and UWW has reallocated medals accordingly.[35][36]
The IOC has requested IWF to modify the results of the weightlifting events, and IWF has reallocated medals accordingly.[24]
 Cuba (CUB) +1 +1
Weightlifting
Women's 69 kg
 Ukraine (UKR) −1 −1
 Colombia (COL) +1 +1
Athletics
Women's triple jump
 Greece (GRE) −1 −1
Weightlifting
Women's +75 kg
 Kazakhstan (KAZ) −1 −1
 Nigeria (NGR) +1 +1
Weightlifting
Men's 105 kg
 Russia (RUS) −1 −1
 Poland (POL) +1 +1
Weightlifting
Women's 63 kg
 Kazakhstan (KAZ) −1 −1
 Chinese Taipei (TPE) +1 −1 0
 Canada (CAN) +1 +1
Athletics
Men's pole vault
 Ukraine (UKR) −1 −1
Wrestling
Men's Greco-Roman 60 kg
 Azerbaijan (AZE) −1 −1
 Kazakhstan (KAZ) +1 −1 0
 China (CHN) +1 +1
Wrestling
Men's Greco-Roman 96 kg
 Kazakhstan (KAZ) −1 −1
 Czech Republic (CZE) +1 +1
Wrestling
Men's Greco-Roman 120 kg
 Russia (RUS) −1 −1
 Lithuania (LTU) +1 −1 0
 France (FRA) +1 +1
25 November 2016 Athletics
Women's hammer throw
 Belarus (BLR) −1 −1 On 25 November 2016, the IOC disqualified Aksana Miankova and Natallia Mikhnevich both from Belarus and Ilya Ilin from Kazakhstan.[38]
The IOC has requested IWF to modify the results of the weightlifting events, and IWF has reallocated medals accordingly.[24]
Athletics
Women's shot put
 Belarus (BLR) −1 −1
Weightlifting
Men's 94 kg
 Kazakhstan (KAZ) −1 −1
 Poland (POL) +1 −1 0
 Georgia (GEO) +1 +1
12 January 2017 Weightlifting
Women's 48 kg
 China (CHN) −1 −1 On 12 January 2017, the IOC disqualified Chen Xiexia, Liu Chunhong and Cao Lei all from China and Nadzeya Ostapchuk from Belarus.[39]
Weightlifting
Women's 69 kg
 China (CHN) −1 −1
Weightlifting
Women's 75 kg
 China (CHN) −1 −1
Athletics
Women's shot put
 Belarus (BLR) −1 −1
25 January 2017 Athletics
Men's 4 × 100 metres relay
 Jamaica (JAM) −1 −1 On 25 January 2017, the Jamaican team were stripped of the gold medal place in the men's 4x100m relay due to Nesta Carter testing positive for the prohibited substance methylhexaneamine.[40][41][42]

Tatyana Lebedeva of Russia lost 2 silver medals in women's triple jump and long jump due to use of turinabol[43]

Athletics
Women's long jump
 Russia (RUS) −1 −1
Athletics
Women's triple jump
 Russia (RUS) −1 −1
List of official changes by country
NOC Gold Silver Bronze Total
 Russia (RUS) −1 −6 −3 −10
 Belarus (BLR) −1 −1 −4 −6
 Kazakhstan (KAZ) −1 −1 −3 −5
 Ukraine (UKR) 0 −2 −2 −4
 China (CHN) −3 +1 0 −2
 North Korea (PRK) 0 0 −2 −2
 Bahrain (BRN) −1 0 0 −1
 Azerbaijan (AZE) 0 −1 0 −1
 Italy (ITA) 0 −1 0 −1
 Turkey (TUR) 0 −1 0 −1
 Uzbekistan (UZB) 0 −1 0 −1
 Armenia (ARM) 0 +1 −2 −1
 Greece (GRE) 0 0 −1 −1
 Norway (NOR) 0 0 −1 −1
 Sweden (SWE) 0 0 −1 −1
 Belgium (BEL) +1 −1 0 0
 Kenya (KEN) +1 −1 0 0
 Chinese Taipei (TPE) 0 +2 −2 0
 Lithuania (LTU) 0 +1 −1 0
 New Zealand (NZL) 0 +1 −1 0
 Poland (POL) +1 −1 +1 +1
 Georgia (GEO) 0 +2 −1 +1
 Czech Republic (CZE) 0 +1 0 +1
 Nigeria (NGR) 0 +1 0 +1
 Samoa (SAM) 0 +1 0 +1
 Switzerland (SUI) 0 +1 0 +1
 United States (USA) 0 +1 0 +1
 Brazil (BRA) 0 0 +2 +2
 Colombia (COL) 0 0 +1 +1
 Indonesia (INA) 0 0 +1 +1
 Thailand (THA) 0 0 +1 +1
 Romania (ROU) 0 0 +1 +1
 South Korea (KOR) 0 0 +1 +1
 Spain (ESP) 0 0 +1 +1
 Canada (CAN) 0 0 +2 +2
 France (FRA) 0 0 +2 +2
 Cuba (CUB) 0 −1 +4 +3
 Jamaica (JAM) −1 0 0 −1
 Trinidad and Tobago (TTO) +1 −1 0 0
 Japan (JPN) 0 +1 −1 0

List of possible changes in medal standings[edit]

2016 wave of retesting[edit]

List of possible changes in medal standings
Ruling date Sport/Event NOC 1st, gold medalist(s) 2nd, silver medalist(s) 3rd, bronze medalist(s) Total Comment
19 August 2016 Athletics
Women's 4 × 400 metres relay
 Jamaica (JAM) +1 −1 0 See above
 Belarus (BLR) +1 +1
1 September 2016 Athletics
Women's discus throw
 Ukraine (UKR) +1 −1 0 See above
 China (CHN) +1 +1
13 September 2016 Athletics
Women's javelin throw
 Germany (GER) +1 −1 0 See above
 Great Britain (GBR) +1 +1
13 September 2016 Athletics
Men's 4 × 400 m relay
 Great Britain (GBR) +1 +1 See above
6 October 2016 Athletics
Women's high jump
 United States (USA) +1 +1 See above
26 October 2016 Athletics
Women's 3000 metres steeplechase
 Russia (RUS) +1 +1 See above
17 November 2016 Athletics
Men's pole vault
 United States (USA) +1 +1 See above
25 November 2016 Athletics
Women's hammer throw
 Cuba (CUB) +1 −1 0 See above
 China (CHN) +1 −1 0
 France (FRA) +1 +1
12 January 2017 Athletics
Women's shot put
 Cuba (CUB) +1 +1 See above
 China (CHN) +1 +1
25 January 2017 Athletics
Men's 4 × 100 metres relay
 Trinidad and Tobago (TTO) +1 −1 0 See above
 Japan (JPN) +1 −1 0
 Brazil (BRA) +1 +1
25 January 2017 Athletics
Women's long jump
 Nigeria (NGR) +1 −1 0 See above
 Jamaica (JAM) +1 +1
25 January 2017 Athletics
Women's triple jump
 Kazakhstan (KAZ) +1 +1 See above
 Cuba (CUB) +1 +1

On 29 August 2016, some non-official reports indicated that Artur Taymazov of Uzbekistan had been stripped of the 2008 Olympic gold medal in the freestyle wrestling 120 kg event due to a positive test for doping.[44]

On 23 September 2016, some non-official reports indicate wrestler Vasyl Fedoryshyn of Ukraine has been stripped of the 2008 Olympic silver medal in the freestyle 60 kg event due to a positive test for doping.[45]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "NOC entry forms received" (Press release). International Olympic Committee. 2008-08-01. Archived from the original on 8 August 2008. Retrieved 2008-08-08. (...) confirmed the qualification of 11,028 athletes, including 363 supplement athletes holding a P card. 
  2. ^ "Afghans win first Olympic medal". BBC Sport. 2008-08-20. Archived from the original on 21 August 2008. Retrieved 2008-08-20. 
  3. ^ "Mauritian delight at first ever medal". Times of India. 2008-08-22. Retrieved 2008-08-26. [dead link]
  4. ^ Osman, Mohamed (2008-08-24). "Darfur runner wins Sudan's first Olympic medal". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 2011-07-14. Retrieved 2009-06-05. 
  5. ^ Talmadge, Eric (2008-08-11). "Italy, Azerbaijan win golds". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-06-05. 
  6. ^ "Togo claims first Olympic medal". BBC News. 2008-08-12. Archived from the original on 13 August 2008. Retrieved 2008-08-12. 
  7. ^ "Naidan wins Mongolia's first gold". BBC News. 2008-08-14. Archived from the original on 15 August 2008. Retrieved 2008-08-14. 
  8. ^ "Liu out, Isinbayeva gets world record". The New York Times. 2008-08-18. Retrieved 2009-06-05. 
  9. ^ "Serbian PM congratulates swimmer on winning medal in Beijing Olympics". Chinaview.cn. 2008-08-17. Archived from the original on 18 August 2008. Retrieved 2008-08-18. 
  10. ^ "Beijing 2008–Games of the XXVIV Olympiad". International Olympic Committee. Archived from the original on 10 August 2008. Retrieved 2008-08-10. 
  11. ^ Randy Harvey (2008-08-17). "Jamaicans 1-2-3 in women's 100". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 18 August 2008. Retrieved 2008-08-17. 
  12. ^ "GOLD: x2 for U.S.". The Globe and Mail. 2008-08-12. Archived from the original on 17 August 2008. Retrieved 2008-08-12. Arkady Vyatchanin of Russia and Hayden Stoeckel of Australia tied for bronze. 
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