2015 Costa Book Awards

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The Costa Book Awards (before 2006 known as the Whitbread Awards) are among the United Kingdom's most prestigious literary awards.[citation needed] They were launched in 1971, are given both for high literary merit but also for works that are enjoyable reading and whose aim is to convey the enjoyment of reading to the widest possible audience. This page gives details of the awards given in the year 2015.

The shortlist was announced c. 17 November 2015.[1] The category winners were announced c. 4 January 2016, and the overall winner was announced on 26 January 2016.[2][3]

Book of the Year[edit]

Winner: Frances Hardinge, The Lie Tree[3]

Children's Book[edit]

Winner: Frances Hardinge, The Lie Tree

Shortlist:

First Novel[edit]

Winner: Andrew Michael Hurley, The Loney

Shortlist:

  • Sara Baume, Spill Simmer Falter Wither
  • Kate Hamer, The Girl in the Red Coat
  • Tasha Kavanagh, Things We Have in Common

Novel[edit]

Winner: Kate Atkinson, A God in Ruins

Shortlist:

Biography[edit]

Winner: Andrea Wulf, The Invention of Nature: The Adventures of Alexander Von Humboldt, The Lost Hero of Science

Shortlist:

  • Robert Douglas-Fairhurst, The Story of Alice: Lewis Carroll and the Secret History of Wonderland
  • Thomas Harding, The House by the Lake
  • Ruth Scurr, John Aubrey: My Own Life

Poetry[edit]

Winner: Don Paterson, 40 Sonnets

Shortlist:

  • Andrew McMillan, Physical
  • Kate Miller, The Observances
  • Neil Rollinson, Talking Dead

Short Story[edit]

  • Winner: TBD
  • Second: TBD
  • Third: TBD

References[edit]

  1. ^ Drabble, Emily (17 November 2015). "The Costa Children's book award shortlist 2015 announced". The Guardian. Retrieved 5 January 2016.
  2. ^ Drabble, Emily (4 January 2016). "Frances Hardinge scoops the Costa children's book award 2015 with The Lie Tree". The Guardian. Retrieved 5 January 2016.
  3. ^ a b Brown, Mark (26 January 2016). "Frances Hardinge's The Lie Tree wins Costa book of the year 2015". The Guardian. Retrieved 27 January 2016.