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FIS Alpine Ski World Cup

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For current season, see 2017 Alpine Skiing World Cup.
Alpine Ski World Cup
Pirmin Zurbriggen 1988.jpg
Genre Alpine skiing
Location(s) Europe
Canada
United States
Japan (rarely)
Russia (rarely)
Australia (rarely)
Argentina (rarely)
South Korea (rarely)
New Zealand (rarely)
Inaugurated 5 January 1967 (5 January 1967) (men)
7 January 1967 (7 January 1967) (ladies)
Founder France Serge Lang
France Honore Bonnet
United States Bob Beattie
Organised by International Ski Federation
People Italy Markus Waldner (men)
Norway Atle Skårdal (ladies)
Sponsor Audi Quattro

The FIS Alpine Ski World Cup is the top international circuit of alpine skiing competitions, launched in 1966 by a group of ski racing friends and experts which included French journalist Serge Lang and the alpine ski team directors from France (Honore Bonnet) and the USA (Bob Beattie).[1] It was soon backed by International Ski Federation president Marc Hodler during the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1966 at Portillo, Chile, and became an official FIS event in the spring of 1967 after the FIS Congress at Beirut, Lebanon. The first World Cup ski race was held in Berchtesgaden, West Germany, on January 5, 1967. Jean-Claude Killy of France and Nancy Greene of Canada were the overall winners for the first two seasons.

Competitors attempt to achieve the best time in four disciplines: slalom, giant slalom, super G, and downhill. The fifth event, the combined, employs the downhill and slalom. The World Cup originally included only slalom, giant slalom, and downhill races. Combined events (calculated using results from selected downhill and slalom races) were included starting with the 1974/75 season, while the Super G was added for the 1982/83 season. The current scoring system was implemented in the 1991/92 season. For every race points are awarded to the top 30 finishers: 100 points to the winner, 80 for second, 60 for third, winding down to 1 point for 30th place. The racer with the most points at the end of the season in mid-March wins the Cup, with the trophy consisting of a 9 kilogram crystal globe.[2] Sub-prizes are also awarded in each individual race discipline, with a smaller 3.5 kg crystal globe. (See the section on scoring system below for more information.)

The World Cup is held annually, and is considered the premier competition for alpine ski racing after the quadrennial Winter Olympics. Many consider the World Cup to be a more valuable title than the Olympics or the biennial World Championships, since it requires a competitor to ski at an extremely high level in several disciplines throughout the season, and not just in one race.[3]

Races are hosted primarily at ski resorts in the Alps in Europe, with regular stops in Scandinavia, North America, and east Asia, but a few races have also been held in the Southern Hemisphere. World Cup competitions have been hosted in 25 different countries around the world: Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bosnia, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States.[4] (Note that all World Cup races hosted at ski resorts in Bosnia and Slovakia were held when those countries were still part of Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia respectively.)

Lower competitive circuits include the NorAm Cup in North America and the Europa Cup in Europe.

Overall winners[edit]

Multiple individual overall World Cup winners are marked with (#). For a complete list of winners in each discipline, see Alpine Skiing World Cup Men and Alpine Skiing World Cup Women.

Men overall titles[edit]

The following skiers have at least three overall alpine World Cup titles.

Name Career Overall Disciplines
DH SG GS SL KB
Austria Marcel Hirscher 2008–active 6 4 4
Luxembourg Marc Girardelli 1980–1996 5 2 1 3 4
Italy Gustav Thöni 1969–1980 4 N/A 3 2
 Switzerland  Pirmin Zurbriggen 1981–1990 4 2 4 3 3
Austria Hermann Maier 1996–2009 4 2 5 3
Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 1973–1989 3 8 8
United States Phil Mahre 1975–1984 3 2 1 4

Ladies overall titles[edit]

The following skiers have at least three overall alpine World Cup titles.

Name Career Overall Disciplines
DH SG GS SL KB
Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll 1969–1980 6 7 N/A 3 2
United States Lindsey Vonn 2001–active 4 8 5 3
Austria Petra Kronberger 1987–1992 3 1
 Switzerland  Vreni Schneider 1984–1995 3 5 6
Croatia Janica Kostelić 1998–2006 3 3 4

Discipline titles[edit]

Combined crystal globe was officially awarded from 2007–2012. However, there are counted all season titles, both official and unofficial. The records for most World Cup titles in each discipline are as follows:

Discipline Men Ladies
Name Country Titles Name Country Titles
Downhill Franz Klammer  Austria 5 Lindsey Vonn  United States 8
Super G Hermann Maier
Aksel Lund Svindal
 Austria
 Norway
5 Katja Seizinger
Lindsey Vonn
 Germany
 United States
5
Giant Slalom Ingemar Stenmark  Sweden 8 Vreni Schneider    Switzerland  5
Slalom Ingemar Stenmark  Sweden 8 Vreni Schneider    Switzerland  6
Combined Kjetil Andre Aamodt  Norway 5 Brigitte Örtli
Janica Kostelić
   Switzerland 
 Croatia
4

For a complete list of winners in each discipline, see Alpine Skiing World Cup Men and Alpine Skiing World Cup Women.

Most World Cup wins in each discipline[edit]

The records for most World Cup wins in each discipline are as follows (as of 11 March 2017):

Men[edit]

Ladies[edit]

Most successful race winners[edit]

A common measurement of how good individual skiers are is the total number of World Cup races won during their skiing career. The following skiers have won at least 20 World Cup races:

As of 18 March 2017

Rank Men Career Victories DH SG GS SL KB PSL PGS
1 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 1973–1989 86 46 40 N/A
2 Austria Hermann Maier 1996–2009 54 15 24 14 1 N/A
3 Italy Alberto Tomba 1986–1998 50 15 35 N/A
4 Luxembourg Marc Girardelli 1980–1996 46 3 9 7 16 11 N/A
5 Austria Marcel Hirscher 2008–active 45 1 22 20 2
6  Switzerland  Pirmin Zurbriggen 1981–1990 40 10 10 7 2 11 N/A
7 Austria Benjamin Raich 1996–2015 36 1 14 14 7 N/A
8 United States Bode Miller 1997–active 33 8 5 9 5 6
9 Norway Aksel Lund Svindal 2001–active 32 12 15 4 1
10 Austria Stephan Eberharter 1989–2004 29 18 6 5 N/A
11 United States Phil Mahre 1975–1984 27 7 9 11 N/A
12 Austria Franz Klammer 1972–1985 26 25 1 N/A
Croatia Ivica Kostelić 1998–2017 26 1 15 9 1
14 United States Ted Ligety 2006–active 25 24 1
15  Switzerland  Peter Müller 1977–1992 24 19 2 3 N/A
Italy Gustav Thöni 1969–1980 24 N/A 11 8 4 1 N/A
17  Switzerland  Michael von Grünigen 1989–2003 23 23 N/A
18 Norway Kjetil André Aamodt 1989–2006 21 1 5 6 1 8 N/A
 Switzerland  Didier Cuche 1993–2012 21 12 6 3 N/A
See also the complete list of FIS Alpine Ski World Cup race winners – Men


As of 11 March 2017

See also the complete list of FIS Alpine Ski World Cup race winners – Women
Rank Ladies Career Victories DH SG GS SL KB PSL PGS
1 United States Lindsey Vonn 2001–active 77 39 27 4 2 5
2 Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll 1969–1980 62 36 N/A 16 3 7 N/A
3  Switzerland  Vreni Schneider 1984–1995 55 20 34 1 N/A
4 Austria Renate Götschl 1993–2009 46 24 17 1 4 N/A
5 Sweden Anja Pärson 1998–2012 42 6 4 11 18 3 N/A
6 Austria Marlies Schild 2001–2014 37 1 35 1 N/A
7 Germany Katja Seizinger 1989–1998 36 16 16 4 N/A
8 Liechtenstein Hanni Wenzel 1972–1984 33 2 12 11 8 N/A
9  Switzerland  Erika Hess 1978–1987 31 6 21 4 N/A
United States Mikaela Shiffrin 2012–active 31 4 25 1 1
11 Croatia Janica Kostelić 1998–2006 30 1 1 2 20 6 N/A
12 Germany Maria Höfl-Riesch 2001–2014 27 11 3 9 4 N/A
13  Switzerland  Michela Figini 1983–1990 26 17 3 2 4 N/A
Slovenia Tina Maze 1999–2015 26 4 1 14 4 3
15  Switzerland  Maria Walliser 1980–1990 25 14 3 6 2 N/A
Austria Michaela Dorfmeister 1991–2006 25 7 10 8 N/A
17 Sweden Pernilla Wiberg 1990–2002 24 2 3 2 14 3 N/A
 Switzerland  Marie-Theres Nadig 1971–1981 24 13 N/A 6 5 N/A
 Switzerland  Lise-Marie Morerod 1973–1980 24 N/A 14 10 N/A
20  Switzerland  Lara Gut 2007–active 23 7 11 4 1
21 France Carole Merle 1981–1994 22 12 10 N/A

Most podiums & Top 10 results[edit]

  • NOTE: Only parallel events from (1975, 1997, 2011–2013, 2016) which count for overall ranking, included on this list, are considered as official individual World Cup victories.

Greatest alpine skiers of all-time[edit]

Based on ski-database super ranking system (since 1966). This is a scoring system calculating points together from three categories: Olympic Games, World Championships and World Cup (overall titles, discipline titles and individual top 10 results).

Men's super ranking[edit]

Ladies' super ranking[edit]

  • As of 20 March 2017

Various records[edit]

Category World Cup
Season(s) Men Record   Season(s) Ladies Record
Prize money in CHF (single season) 2000 Austria Hermann Maier 660,000 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 701,797
Overall points 2000 Austria Hermann Maier 2000 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 2414
Margin of victory 2001 Austria Hermann Maier 743 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 1313
Avg. points per race (participated races) 2013 Austria Marcel Hirscher 77 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 69
Avg. points per race (all races in a season) 2000 Austria Hermann Maier 50 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 69
Overall leader (complete season) 2005 United States Bode Miller 36 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 35
Overall titles 20122017 Austria Marcel Hirscher 6 19691980 Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll 6
Consecutive overall titles 20122017 Austria Marcel Hirscher 6 19711975 Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll 5
Discipline titles 19751984 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 16 20082016 United States Lindsey Vonn 16
Discipline titles (single season) 1987  Switzerland  Pirmin Zurbriggen 4 20102012 United States Lindsey Vonn 3
All titles 19751984 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 19 20082016 United States Lindsey Vonn 20
Wins (single season) 1979
2001
Sweden Ingemar Stenmark
Austria Hermann Maier
13 1989  Switzerland  Vreni Schneider 14
Most wins at one venue (single discipline) 20082016
20062016
United States Ted Ligety
Norway Aksel Lund Svindal
6 20052016 United States Lindsey Vonn 14
Podiums (single season) 2000 Austria Hermann Maier 22 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 24
Top 10s (single season) 1999 Norway Kjetil André Aamodt 28 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 32
5 discipline winners (single season) 1989 Luxembourg Marc Girardelli 1 1991
2006
2013
Austria Petra Kronberger
Croatia Janica Kostelić
Slovenia Tina Maze
1
1
1
Total wins 19751989 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 86 20052017 United States Lindsey Vonn 77
Total podiums 19741989 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 155 20042017 United States Lindsey Vonn 130
Top 10 results 19902006 Norway Kjetil André Aamodt 231 20042017 United States Lindsey Vonn 203
World Cup starts 19962015 Austria Benjamin Raich 441 19932009 Austria Renate Götschl 408
Winner with the highest start No. 1994 Liechtenstein Markus Foser 66 1994 Slovenia Katja Koren 66
Youngest race winner 1973 Italy Piero Gros 18.1 1974 Germany Christa Zechmeister 16.0
Oldest race winner 2012  Switzerland  Didier Cuche 37.5 2015 Austria Elisabeth Goergl 33.8
Consecutive wins (all disciplines) 19771978 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 10 1989  Switzerland  Vreni Schneider 10
Consecutive wins (single discipline) 19781980 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 15 19891990  Switzerland  Vreni Schneider 12
Consecutive podiums (all disciplines) 19791981 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 41 19791980  Switzerland  Marie-Therese Nadig 14
Consecutive podiums (single discipline) 19771982 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 37 19711974 Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll 23
Top speed (kph) 2013 France Johan Clarey 161.9 1990
2012
Germany Katharina Gutensohn
United States Lindsey Vonn
138

NOTE: Only crystal globe awarded discipline officially counts as titles. And medal's awarded DH, GS, SL disciplines in seasons 1967-1977 as well. Combined crystal globe was officially awarded only in seasons 2007-2012.

20 wins and more in Speed/Technical Events[edit]

  • NOTE: Super G not contested at that time.
  • NOTE: Parallel events are not included in the list as slalom wins.

All-event winners[edit]

Only a few of the most versatile racers have ever managed to win races in all five World Cup alpine skiing disciplines during their career, as listed in the table below. Marc Girardelli (1988–89), Petra Kronberger (1990–91), Janica Kostelić (2005–6) and Tina Maze (2012–13) are the only skiers to have won all five events in a single season. Of these, Tina Maze is the only one to have won five different events in a row within a single season (2012-13, between December 16 and March 2). Bode Miller is the only skier with at least five World Cup victories in all five disciplines.