FIS Alpine Ski World Cup

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Alpine Ski World Cup
20170213 HIRSCHER MARCEL C6864.jpg
GenreAlpine skiing
Location(s)Europe
Canada
United States
Japan (rarely)
Russia (rarely)
Australia (rarely)
Argentina (rarely)
South Korea (rarely)
New Zealand (rarely)
Inaugurated5 January 1967 (5 January 1967) (men)
7 January 1967 (7 January 1967) (ladies)
FounderFrance Serge Lang
France Honore Bonnet
United States Bob Beattie
Previous event2017–18 season
Organised byInternational Ski Federation
PeopleItaly Markus Waldner (men)
Norway Atle Skårdal (ladies)
SponsorAudi Quattro

The FIS Alpine Ski World Cup is the top international circuit of alpine skiing competitions, launched in 1966 by a group of ski racing friends and experts which included French journalist Serge Lang and the alpine ski team directors from France (Honore Bonnet) and the USA (Bob Beattie).[1] It was soon backed by International Ski Federation president Marc Hodler during the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1966 at Portillo, Chile, and became an official FIS event in the spring of 1967 after the FIS Congress at Beirut, Lebanon. The first World Cup ski race was held in Berchtesgaden, West Germany, on January 5, 1967. Jean-Claude Killy of France and Nancy Greene of Canada were the overall winners for the first two seasons.

Rules[edit]

Competitors attempt to achieve the best time in four disciplines: slalom, giant slalom, super G, and downhill. The fifth event, the combined, employs the downhill and slalom. The World Cup originally included only slalom, giant slalom, and downhill races. Combined events (calculated using results from selected downhill and slalom races) were included starting with the 1974–75 season, while the Super G was added for the 1982–83 season. The current scoring system was implemented in the 1991–92 season. For every race points are awarded to the top 30 finishers: 100 points to the winner, 80 for second, 60 for third, winding down to 1 point for 30th place. The racer with the most points at the end of the season in mid-March wins the Cup, with the trophy consisting of a 9 kilogram crystal globe.[2] Sub-prizes are also awarded in each individual race discipline, with a smaller 3.5 kg crystal globe. (See the section on scoring system below for more information.)

The World Cup is held annually, and is considered the premier competition for alpine ski racing after the quadrennial Winter Olympics. Many consider the World Cup to be a more valuable title than the Olympics or the biennial World Championships, since it requires a competitor to ski at an extremely high level in several disciplines throughout the season, and not just in one race.[3]

Races are hosted primarily at ski resorts in the Alps in Europe, with regular stops in Scandinavia, North America, and east Asia, but a few races have also been held in the Southern Hemisphere. World Cup competitions have been hosted in 25 different countries around the world: Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States.[4] (Note that all World Cup races hosted in Bosnia were held when it was still part of Yugoslavia.)

Lower competitive circuits include the NorAm Cup in North America and the Europa Cup in Europe.

Overall winners[edit]

Multiple individual overall World Cup winners are marked with (#).

Individual[edit]

Season Men Ladies
Name Country Name Country
1967 Jean-Claude Killy  France Nancy Greene  Canada
1968 Jean-Claude Killy (2)  France Nancy Greene (2)  Canada
1968–69 Karl Schranz  Austria Gertrud Gabl  Austria
1969–70 Karl Schranz (2)  Austria Michèle Jacot  France
1970–71 Gustav Thöni  Italy Annemarie Pröll  Austria
1971–72 Gustav Thöni (2)  Italy Annemarie Pröll (2)  Austria
1972–73 Gustav Thöni (3)  Italy Annemarie Pröll (3)  Austria
1973–74 Piero Gros  Italy Annemarie Pröll (4)  Austria
1974–75 Gustav Thöni (4)  Italy Annemarie Moser-Pröll (5)  Austria
1975–76 Ingemar Stenmark  Sweden Rosi Mittermaier Flag of Germany.svg West Germany
1976–77 Ingemar Stenmark (2)  Sweden Lise-Marie Morerod    Switzerland 
1977–78 Ingemar Stenmark (3)  Sweden Hanni Wenzel  Liechtenstein
1978–79 Peter Lüscher    Switzerland  Annemarie Moser-Pröll (6)  Austria
1979–80 Andreas Wenzel  Liechtenstein Hanni Wenzel (2)  Liechtenstein
1980–81 Phil Mahre  United States Marie-Theres Nadig    Switzerland 
1981–82 Phil Mahre (2)  United States Erika Hess    Switzerland 
1982–83 Phil Mahre (3)  United States Tamara McKinney  United States
1983–84 Pirmin Zurbriggen    Switzerland  Erika Hess (2)    Switzerland 
1984–85 Marc Girardelli  Luxembourg Michela Figini    Switzerland 
1985–86 Marc Girardelli (2)  Luxembourg Maria Walliser    Switzerland 
1986–87 Pirmin Zurbriggen (2)    Switzerland  Maria Walliser (2)    Switzerland 
1987–88 Pirmin Zurbriggen (3)    Switzerland  Michela Figini (2)    Switzerland 
1988–89 Marc Girardelli (3)  Luxembourg Vreni Schneider    Switzerland 
1989–90 Pirmin Zurbriggen (4)    Switzerland  Petra Kronberger  Austria
1990–91 Marc Girardelli (4)  Luxembourg Petra Kronberger (2)  Austria
1991–92 Paul Accola    Switzerland  Petra Kronberger (3)  Austria
1992–93 Marc Girardelli (5)  Luxembourg Anita Wachter  Austria
1993–94 Kjetil André Aamodt  Norway Vreni Schneider (2)    Switzerland 
1994–95 Alberto Tomba  Italy Vreni Schneider (3)    Switzerland 
1995–96 Lasse Kjus  Norway Katja Seizinger  Germany
1996–97 Luc Alphand  France Pernilla Wiberg  Sweden
1997–98 Hermann Maier  Austria Katja Seizinger (2)  Germany
1998–99 Lasse Kjus (2)  Norway Alexandra Meissnitzer  Austria
1999–00 Hermann Maier (2)  Austria Renate Götschl  Austria
2000–01 Hermann Maier (3)  Austria Janica Kostelić  Croatia
2001–02 Stephan Eberharter  Austria Michaela Dorfmeister  Austria
2002–03 Stephan Eberharter (2)  Austria Janica Kostelić (2)  Croatia
2003–04 Hermann Maier (4)  Austria Anja Pärson  Sweden
2004–05 Bode Miller  United States Anja Pärson (2)  Sweden
2005–06 Benjamin Raich  Austria Janica Kostelić (3)  Croatia
2006–07 Aksel Lund Svindal  Norway Nicole Hosp  Austria
2007–08 Bode Miller (2)  United States Lindsey Vonn  United States
2008–09 Aksel Lund Svindal (2)  Norway Lindsey Vonn (2)  United States
2009–10 Carlo Janka    Switzerland  Lindsey Vonn (3)  United States
2010–11 Ivica Kostelić  Croatia Maria Riesch  Germany
2011–12 Marcel Hirscher  Austria Lindsey Vonn (4)  United States
2012–13 Marcel Hirscher (2)  Austria Tina Maze  Slovenia
2013–14 Marcel Hirscher (3)  Austria Anna Fenninger  Austria
2014–15 Marcel Hirscher (4)  Austria Anna Fenninger (2)  Austria
2015–16 Marcel Hirscher (5)  Austria Lara Gut    Switzerland 
2016–17 Marcel Hirscher (6)  Austria Mikaela Shiffrin  United States
2017–18 Marcel Hirscher (7)  Austria Mikaela Shiffrin (2)  United States

Individual titles by country[edit]

Nation Total Men Ladies
 Austria 33 16 17
   Switzerland  19 7 12
 United States 12 5 7
 Sweden 6 3 3
 Italy 6 6
 Norway 5 5
 Luxembourg 5 5
 France 4 3 1
 Croatia 4 1 3
 Liechtenstein 3 1 2
 Germany 3 3
 Canada 2 2
 West Germany 1 1
 Slovenia 1 1

Men overall titles[edit]

The following skiers have at least three overall alpine World Cup titles.

Name Career Overall Disciplines
DH SG GS SL KB
Austria Marcel Hirscher 2007–active 7 5 5
Luxembourg Marc Girardelli 1980–1996 5 2 1 3 4
Italy Gustav Thöni 1969–1980 4 N/A 3 2
 Switzerland  Pirmin Zurbriggen 1981–1990 4 2 4 3 3
Austria Hermann Maier 1996–2009 4 2 5 3
United States Phil Mahre 1975–1984 3 2 1 4
Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 1973–1989 3 N/A 8 8

Ladies overall titles[edit]

The following skiers have at least three overall alpine World Cup titles.

Name Career Overall Disciplines
DH SG GS SL KB
Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll 1969–1980 6 7 N/A 3 2
United States Lindsey Vonn 2001–active 4 8 5 3
Austria Petra Kronberger 1987–1992 3 1
 Switzerland  Vreni Schneider 1984–1995 3 5 6
Croatia Janica Kostelić 1998–2006 3 3 4

Discipline titles[edit]

Top 10 Small Crystal Globe podiums[edit]

  Still active
# Skier Period 1st 2nd 3rd
1 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 1975–1987 16 7 1
2 Switzerland Pirmin Zurbriggen 1983–1990 12 3 3
3 Luxembourg Marc Girardelli 1982–1996 10 5 6
4 Austria Hermann Maier 1998–2006 10 5 3
5 Austria Marcel Hirscher 2012–2018 10 3 1
6 Norway Aksel Lund Svindal 2006–2018 9 3 3
7 Italy Alberto Tomba 1988–1996 8 5 0
8 Austria Benjamin Raich 2001–2010 8 4 5
9 Norway Kjetil André Aamodt 1993–2003 8 4 2
10 United States Phil Mahre 1978–1983 7 2 3

Most small globes per discipline[edit]

Combined crystal globe was officially awarded from 2007–2012. However, there are counted all season titles, both official and unofficial. The records for most World Cup titles in each discipline are as follows:

Men[edit]

  Won all discipline races in a season
Super-G

In the following table men's Super-G World Cup podiums since first edition in 1986.

Season 1st 2nd 3rd
1986 Germany Markus Wasmeier Switzerland Pirmin Zurbriggen Luxembourg Marc Girardelli
1987 Switzerland Pirmin Zurbriggen Luxembourg Marc Girardelli Germany Markus Wasmeier
1988 Switzerland Pirmin Zurbriggen Germany Markus Wasmeier France Franck Piccard
1989 Switzerland Pirmin Zurbriggen Sweden Lars-Börje Eriksson France Franck Piccard
1990 Switzerland Pirmin Zurbriggen Austria Günther Mader Sweden Lars-Börje Eriksson
1991 Switzerland Franz Heinzer Austria Stephan Eberharter Norway Atle Skaardal
1992 Switzerland Paul Accola Luxembourg Marc Girardelli Austria Günther Mader
1993 Norway Kjetil-Andre Aamodt Austria Günther Mader Switzerland Franz Heinzer
1994 Norway Jan Einar Thorsen Luxembourg Marc Girardelli United States Tommy Moe
1995 Italy Peter Runggaldier Austria Günther Mader Italy Werner Perathoner
1996 Norway Atle Skaardal Austria Hans Knauß Norway Lasse Kjus
1997 France Luc Alphand Austria Josef Strobl Austria Andreas Schifferer
1998 Austria Hermann Maier Austria Hans Knauß Austria Stephan Eberharter
1999 Austria Hermann Maier Austria Stephan Eberharter Austria Andreas Schifferer
2000 Austria Hermann Maier Austria Werner Franz Austria Fritz Strobl
2001 Austria Hermann Maier Austria Christoph Gruber Austria Josef Strobl
2002 Austria Stephan Eberharter Switzerland Didier Cuche Austria Fritz Strobl
2003 Austria Stephan Eberharter Liechtenstein Marco Büchel Switzerland Didier Cuche
2004 Austria Hermann Maier United States Daron Rahlves Austria Stephan Eberharter
2005 United States Bode Miller Austria Hermann Maier United States Daron Rahlves
2006 Norway Aksel Lund Svindal Austria Hermann Maier United States Daron Rahlves
2007 United States Bode Miller Switzerland Didier Cuche Canada John Kucera
2008 Austria Hannes Reichelt Switzerland Didier Cuche Austria Benjamin Raich
2009 Norway Aksel Lund Svindal Italy Werner Heel Switzerland Didier Defago
2010 Canada Erik Guay Austria Michael Walchhofer Norway Aksel Lund Svindal
2011 Switzerland Didier Cuche Austria Georg Streitberger Croatia Ivica Kostelić
2012 Norway Aksel Lund Svindal Switzerland Didier Cuche Switzerland Beat Feuz
2013 Norway Aksel Lund Svindal Italy Matteo Marsaglia Austria Matthias Mayer
2014 Norway Aksel Lund Svindal Norway Kjetil Jansrud Switzerland Patrick Küng
2015 Norway Kjetil Jansrud Italy Dominik Paris Austria Matthias Mayer
2016 Norway Aleksander Aamodt Kilde Norway Kjetil Jansrud Norway Aksel Lund Svindal
2017 Norway Kjetil Jansrud Austria Hannes Reichelt Norway Aleksander Aamodt Kilde
2018 Norway Kjetil Jansrud Austria Vincent Kriechmayr Norway Aksel Lund Svindal

Most races wins in each discipline[edit]

Men[edit]

As of 29 January 2019

Ladies[edit]

Most successful race winners[edit]

A common measurement of how good individual skiers are is the total number of World Cup races won during their skiing career. The following skiers have won at least 20 World Cup races:

Men's race winners[edit]

As of 11 February 2019

Rank Men Career Wins DH SG GS SL KB PSL PGS
1 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 1973–1989 86 46 40 N/A
2 Austria Marcel Hirscher 2007–active 68 1 32 32 2 1
3 Austria Hermann Maier 1996–2009 54 15 24 14 1 N/A
4 Italy Alberto Tomba 1986–1998 50 15 35 N/A
5 Luxembourg Marc Girardelli 1980–1996 46 3 9 7 16 11 N/A
6  Switzerland  Pirmin Zurbriggen 1981–1990 40 10 10 7 2 11 N/A
7 Austria Benjamin Raich 1996–2015 36 1 14 14 7 N/A
Norway Aksel Lund Svindal 2001–2019 36 14 17 4 1
9 United States Bode Miller 1997–2017 33 8 5 9 5 6
10 Austria Stephan Eberharter 1989–2004 29 18 6 5 N/A
11 United States Phil Mahre 1975–1984 27 7 9 11 N/A
12 Austria Franz Klammer 1972–1985 26 25 1 N/A
Croatia Ivica Kostelić 1998–2017 26 1 15 9 1
14 United States Ted Ligety 2004–active 25 24 1
15 Italy Gustav Thöni 1969–1980 24 N/A 11 8 4 1 N/A
 Switzerland  Peter Müller 1977–1992 24 19 2 3 N/A
17  Switzerland  Michael von Grünigen 1989–2003 23 23 N/A
18 Norway Kjetil Jansrud 2003–active 22 8 12 1 1
19 Norway Kjetil André Aamodt 1989–2006 21 1 5 6 1 8 N/A
 Switzerland  Didier Cuche 1993–2012 21 12 6 3 N/A
France  Alexis Pinturault 2009–active 21 1 10 2 7 1

Women's race winners[edit]

As of 2 February 2019

Rank Ladies Career Wins DH SG GS SL KB PSL
1 United States Lindsey Vonn 2001–2019 82 43 28 4 2 5
2 Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll 1969–1980 62 36 N/A 16 3 7
3 United States Mikaela Shiffrin 2012–active 56 1 3 9 38 1 4
4  Switzerland  Vreni Schneider 1984–1995 55 20 34 1
5 Austria Renate Götschl 1993–2009 46 24 17 1 4
6 Sweden Anja Pärson 1998–2012 42 6 4 11 18 3
7 Austria Marlies Schild 2001–2014 37 1 35 1
8 Germany Katja Seizinger 1989–1998 36 16 16 4
9 Liechtenstein Hanni Wenzel 1972–1984 33 2 12 11 8
10  Switzerland  Erika Hess 1978–1987 31 6 21 4
11 Croatia Janica Kostelić 1998–2006 30 1 1 2 20 6
12 Germany Maria Höfl-Riesch 2001–2014 27 11 3 9 4
13  Switzerland  Michela Figini 1983–1990 26 17 3 2 4
Slovenia Tina Maze 1999–2015 26 4 1 14 4 3
15  Switzerland  Maria Walliser 1980–1990 25 14 3 6 2
Austria Michaela Dorfmeister 1991–2006 25 7 10 8
17  Switzerland  Lise-Marie Morerod 1973–1980 24 N/A 14 10
 Switzerland  Marie-Theres Nadig 1971–1981 24 13 N/A 6 5
Sweden Pernilla Wiberg 1990–2002 24 2 3 2 14 3
 Switzerland  Lara Gut 2008–active 24 7 12 4 1
21 France Carole Merle 1981–1994 22 12 10
22 Germany Hilde Gerg 1993–2005 20 7 8 1 3 1

Most podiums and Top 10 results[edit]

As of 11 February 2019.[9][10]

  Still active

Career podiums[edit]

Career Top 10 results[edit]

  • Note: Only parallel events from (1975, 1997, 2011–2013, 2016) which count for overall ranking, included on this list, are considered as official individual World Cup victories.

Greatest alpine skiers of all time[edit]

Based on ski-database super ranking system (since 1966), this scoring system is calculated using points from three categories: Olympic Games, World Championships, and World Cup (overall titles, discipline titles and individual top 10 results).

Men's super ranking[edit]

Ladies' super ranking[edit]

  • As of 11 February 2019

Parallel slalom[edit]

Parallel slalom events from 1976 to 1991 counted for Nations Cup only. Events with 16 instead of 32 competitors are officially called city events (CE).

Men[edit]

Date Place Season Winner Second Third
Nations Cup
20 March 1976   Canada Mont St. Anne 1975/76 Italy Franco Bieler Sweden Ingemar Stenmark Canada Jim Hunter
26 March 1977   Spain Sierra Nevada 1976/77 Austria Manfred Brunner Austria Klaus Heidegger Italy Bruno Nöckler
19 March 1978    Switzerland  Arosa 1977/78 United States Phil Mahre Sweden Ingemar Stenmark Austria Leonhard Stock
14 December 1978   Italy Madonna di Campiglio 1978/79 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark Italy Mauro Bernardi Italy Karl Trojer
14 March 1980   Austria Saalbach 1979/80 Austria Anton Steiner Sweden Ingemar Stenmark Norway Jarle Halsnes
30 March 1981    Switzerland  Laax 1980/81 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark Norway Jarle Halsnes United States Phil Mahre
28 March 1982   France Montgenèvre 1981/82 United States Phil Mahre Sweden Ingemar Stenmark Austria Hans Enn
21 March 1983   Japan Furano 1982/83 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark (3) United States Phil Mahre Liechtenstein Andreas Wenzel
25 March 1984   Norway Oslo 1983/84 Austria Hans Enn Austria Anton Steiner Sweden Ingemar Stenmark
6 January 1986   Austria Vienna 1985/86 Italy Ivano Edalini Germany Markus Wasmeier Austria Anton Steiner
22 March 1986   Canada Bromont Liechtenstein Paul Frommelt Italy Marco Tonazzi Luxembourg Marc Girardelli
28 December 1986   Germany Berlin 1986/87 Austria Leonhard Stock Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Bojan Križaj Germany Michael Eder
22 December 1987   Italy Bormio 1987/88  Switzerland  Pirmin Zurbriggen  Switzerland  Joël Gaspoz  Switzerland  Martin Hangl
27 March 1988   Austria Saalbach Italy Alberto Tomba  Switzerland  Pirmin Zurbriggen Austria Helmut Mayer
11 March 1989   Japan Shiga Kōgen 1988/89 Austria Bernhard Gstrein  Switzerland  Pirmin Zurbriggen Austria Rudolf Nierlich
24 March 1991   United States Waterville 1990/91  Switzerland  Urs Kälin  Switzerland  Paul Accola Norway Ole Kristian Furuseth
Promotional event
2 January 2009   Russia Moscow 2008/09 Germany Felix Neureuther France Jean-Baptiste Grange United States Bode Miller
21 November 2009   Russia Moscow 2009/10 Austria Marcel Hirscher France Steve Missillier Canada Michael Janyk
World Cup
23 March 1975   Italy Val Gardena 1974/75 Italy Gustav Thöni Sweden Ingemar Stenmark  Switzerland  Walter Tresch
24 October 1997   France Tignes 1997/98 Austria Josef Strobl Norway Kjetil André Aamodt Austria Hermann Maier
2 January 2011   Germany Munich 2010/11 Croatia Ivica Kostelić France Julien Lizeroux United States Bode Miller
21 February 2012   Russia Moscow 2011/12 France Alexis Pinturault Germany Felix Neureuther Sweden André Myhrer
1 January 2013   Germany Munich 2012/13 Germany Felix Neureuther Austria Marcel Hirscher France Alexis Pinturault
29 January 2013   Russia Moscow Austria Marcel Hirscher Sweden André Myhrer Croatia Ivica Kostelić
23 February 2016   Sweden Stockholm 2015/16 Austria Marcel Hirscher (2) Sweden André Myhrer Italy Stefano Gross
31 January 2017   Sweden Stockholm 2016/17 Germany Linus Straßer France Alexis Pinturault Sweden Mattias Hargin
1 January 2018   Norway Oslo 2017/18 Sweden André Myhrer Austria Michael Matt Germany Linus Straßer
30 January 2018   Sweden Stockholm  Switzerland  Ramon Zenhäusern Sweden André Myhrer (3) Germany Linus Straßer
1 January 2019   Norway Oslo 2018/19 Austria Marco Schwarz United Kingdom Dave Ryding  Switzerland  Ramon Zenhäusern
19 February 2019   Sweden Stockholm

Ladies[edit]

Date Place Season Winner Second Third
Nations Cup
20 March 1976   Canada Mont St. Anne 1975/76  Switzerland  Bernadette Zurbriggen West Germany Irene Epple Austria Monika Kaserer
26 March 1977   Spain Sierra Nevada 1976/77 Germany Christa Zechmeister  Switzerland  Marie-Theres Nadig Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll
19 March 1978    Switzerland  Arosa 1977/78 Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll West Germany Christa Zechmeister United States Viki Fleckenstein
16 March 1980   Austria Saalbach 1979/80 Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll (2) Italy Claudia Giordani West Germany Maria Epple
30 March 1981    Switzerland  Laax 1980/81 United States Tamara McKinney West Germany Traudl Hächer Liechtenstein Hanni Wenzel
28 March 1982   France Montgenèvre 1981/82 Germany Maria Epple Austria Lea Sölkner France Perrine Pelen
21 March 1983   Japan Furano 1982/83 France Anne-Flore Rey Liechtenstein Hanni Wenzel Austria Anni Kronbichler
25 March 1984   Norway Oslo 1983/84 Czechoslovakia Olga Charvátová  Switzerland  Erika Hess United States Tamara McKinney
22 March 1986   Canada Bromont 1985/86  Switzerland  Vreni Schneider  Switzerland  Maria Walliser  Switzerland  Corinne Schmidhauser
18 January 1987   Germany Munich 1986/87 United States Tamara McKinney France Małgorzata Tlałka-Mogore  Switzerland  Corinne Schmidhauser
22 December 1987   Italy Bormio 1987/88  Switzerland  Brigitte Oertli  Switzerland  Corinne Schmidhauser  Switzerland  Michela Figini
27 March 1988   Austria Saalbach Germany Christina Meier Austria Ulrike Maier Austria Roswitha Steiner
11 March 1989   Japan Shiga Kōgen 1988/89  Switzerland  Chantal Bournissen Germany Michaela Gerg-Leitner United States Tamara McKinney
24 March 1991   United States Waterville 1990/91 Austria Anita Wachter Austria Ingrid Salvenmoser  Switzerland  Chantal Bournissen
Promotional event
21 November 2009   Russia Moscow 2009/10 Sweden Therese Borssén Germany Maria Riesch Sweden Frida Hansdotter
World Cup
24 March 1975   Italy Val Gardena 1974/75 Austria Monika Kaserer Italy Claudia Giordani France Fabienne Serrat
24 October 1997   France Tignes 1997/98 France Leila Piccard Sweden Ylva Nowén Austria Alexandra Meissnitzer
28 November 1997   United States Mammoth Mountain Germany Hilde Gerg Germany Martina Ertl Austria Alexandra Meissnitzer
2 January 2011   Germany Munich 2010/11 Sweden Maria Pietilä-Holmner Slovenia Tina Maze Austria Elisabeth Görgl
21 February 2012   Russia Moscow 2011/12 United States Julia Mancuso Austria Michaela Kirchgasser United States Lindsey Vonn
1 January 2013   Germany Munich 2012/13 Slovakia Veronika Velez Zuzulová Slovenia Tina Maze Austria Michaela Kirchgasser
29 January 2013   Russia Moscow Germany Lena Dürr Slovakia Veronika Velez-Zuzulová United States Mikaela Shiffrin
23 February 2016   Sweden Stockholm 2015/16  Switzerland  Wendy Holdener Sweden Frida Hansdotter Sweden Maria Pietilä-Holmner
31 January 2017   Sweden Stockholm 2016/17 United States Mikaela Shiffrin Slovakia Veronika Velez-Zuzulová Norway Nina Løseth
20 December 2017   France Courchevel 2017/18 United States Mikaela Shiffrin Slovakia Petra Vlhová Italy Irene Curtoni
1 January 2018   Norway Oslo United States Mikaela Shiffrin  Switzerland  Wendy Holdener  Switzerland  Mélanie Meillard
30 January 2018   Sweden Stockholm Norway Nina Haver-Løseth  Switzerland  Wendy Holdener Slovakia Petra Vlhová
9 December 2018    Switzerland  St. Moritz 2018/19 United States Mikaela Shiffrin (4) Slovakia Petra Vlhová  Switzerland  Wendy Holdener
1 January 2019   Norway Oslo Slovakia Petra Vlhová United States Mikaela Shiffrin  Switzerland  Wendy Holdener
19 February 2019   Sweden Stockholm

Parallel giant slalom[edit]

Introduced by the International Ski Federation to the World Cup as a spectator-friendly event in late 2015, the parallel giant slalom competition, or shortened parallel-G, joining the parallel slalom, is intended to lure more speed specialists into the faster of the two technical disciplines, along with attracting their fans to watch the races at the venue, on-line, and on television.[11] The Federation has not indicated, as of early 2016, that they are fully committed to duplicating the effort, however, their long-term calendar shows that the plan is to return to Alta Badia twelve months after the inaugural event in December 2016, and then again, tentatively, through December 2018.[12] Few venues offer the slope and conditions required to host an extremely short Giant Slalom course that can be readily viewed in its entirety by a compact gallery of fans. Modified or not, the Federation has not suggested that they will push the format to lower-level tours like the NorAm and Europa Cup.

Format[edit]

The Chief Race Director of the inaugural event at Alta Badia, Markus Waldner, on 20 December 2015 stated that "great performances" and "head-to-head fights" between the best Giant Slalom racers is the goal of the competition. The course for the first race was very compact at about 20–22 seconds duration, or about one-third of a normal GS run, however, the pace and cadence will be the same as Giant Slalom, not standard Slalom. Gates were set at roughly the same distances as GS and on a slope of about the same pitch. The field of thirty-two were drawn following an "invitational" format. The top four men in the overall World Cup rankings were automatic invitees, if they chose to compete. Another sixteen racers were selected from the top of the current GS start list rankings, and the final twelve competitors were selected from the 1st run efforts at the standard GS event the day prior at the same venue. Overlapping qualifications allowed the sponsors to invite lower ranked participants to fill in gaps, as needed, and to replace individuals who declined to participate. Points were awarded and accumulated according to current standards for the race season in all relevant categories: the GS discipline, Overall and Nations Cup. The field was filled with thirty-two first round participants, each getting a run on either course. The best combined times moved the fastest racer to the second round through bracket preference protocols. From the second round, skiers the head-to-head competitions were held over one run only, with the faster skier from the previous round granted course selection between the 'red-right' or 'blue-left' course. At about one-third the time of a standard GS event, top performers/finalists were able to make multiple runs without the fatigue of a longer event. The course was methodically set with lasers, and a GPS-equipped Snowcat, to guarantee that both courses on the hill were as identical as possible to ensure equity and a fair competition. The Race Director suggested the difference between the two lanes were within "1–to–2 centimeters" tolerance of one another.

Events[edit]

Men's World Cup parallel giant slalom events
Venue Date Winner Second Third Fourth Notes
Italy Alta Badia 21 December 2015   Norway Kjetil Jansrud Norway Aksel Lund Svindal Sweden Andre Myhrer Germany Dominik Schwaiger   [13][14]
Italy Alta Badia 19 December 2016   France Cyprien Sarrazin  Switzerland Carlo Janka Norway Kjetil Jansrud Norway Leif Kristian Haugen [15][16]
Italy Alta Badia 18 December 2017   Sweden Matts Olsson Norway Henrik Kristoffersen Austria Marcel Hirscher Norway Aleksander Aamodt Kilde [17]
Italy Alta Badia 17 December 2018   Austria Marcel Hirscher France Thibaut Favrot France Alexis Pinturault Sweden Matts Olsson [18][19]

Various records[edit]

NOTE: Only crystal globe awarded discipline officially counts as titles. And medal's awarded DH, GS, SL disciplines in seasons 1967–1977 as well. Combined crystal globe was officially awarded only in seasons 2007–2012.

World Cup timeline[edit]

World Cup hosting countries
KB – Classic/Super/Alpine Combined; PS – Parallel slalom/City event; PG – Parallel giant slalom
Season   Men   Ladies   Team
DH SG GS SL KB PS PG Total DH SG GS SL KB PS Total Total
1967 5 N/A 5 7 N/A N/