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Avocado cake

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Avocado cake
A mocha almond fudge avocado layer cake. Avocado is present within the layers of the cake.
A mocha almond fudge avocado layer cake. Avocado is present within the layers of the cake.
TypeCake
CourseDessert
Serving temperatureCold or warmed
Main ingredientsAvocado fruit and cake batter
Similar dishesFruitcake

Avocado cake is a cake prepared using avocado as a primary ingredient, together with other typical cake ingredients. The avocados can be mashed, and may be used as an ingredient in cake batter, in cake toppings and alone atop a cake. Cake variations include raw avocado cake, avocado brownies and avocado cheesecake. Raw, uncooked versions of avocado cake can be high in vitamin E and essential fatty acids, which are derived from avocado. Avocado-based cake toppings include avocado fool and avocado crazy.

Overview[edit]

Avocado is a primary ingredient in avocado cake

Avocado is a main ingredient in avocado cake, along with other typical cake ingredients.[1] Various varieties of avocados can be used. Avocado cake may have a subtle avocado flavor imbued in the dish.[2] Mashed avocado can be used as an ingredient in the batter and in cake frostings and toppings.[1][3][4] Sliced avocado can be used to top or garnish it,[3] as can other ingredients such as the zest of citrus fruits.[5]

Additional ingredients used can include yogurt, buttermilk, raisins, dates, walnuts, hazelnuts, allspice, cinnamon and nutmeg[1][6] among others. Lemon juice may be used on the avocado to prevent browning from occurring.[5] Avocado cake can be prepared as a vegetarian and vegan dish.[4][7] Chocolate cake and pancakes can be prepared with avocado as an ingredient in the batter.[4][6]

Variations[edit]

Raw avocado cake[edit]

Avocado cake can be prepared as an uncooked cake using raw avocados and other raw ingredients, which are blended together into a smooth consistency and then chilled.[5] A food processor can be used to blend the ingredients.[5] Raw avocado cake prepared with a significant amount of avocado may contain substantial amounts of vitamin E and essential fatty acids, which are derived from avocado.[a]

Avocado brownies[edit]

Avocado brownies are brownies prepared using avocado as a primary ingredient.[8] The use of overripe avocados may contribute to the gooey, fudge-like consistency of the dish.[8] Black beans can be used in the dish, and can be used in the place of flour.[9]

Avocado cheesecake[edit]

Avocado cheesecake is a style of cheesecake prepared using avocado as a main ingredient.[10] Raw avocados may be used in its preparation,[11] and it may have a creamy texture and consistency.[12] Avocado cheesecake was featured in an episode of the television show MasterChef in March 2015.[10]

Avocado-based cake toppings[edit]

Avocado cakes can be topped with an avocado-based fool.[1] A fool is a pressed fruit mixture or fruit purée that is mixed with cream or custard.[1] The term "fool" in this context dates to the 16th century, and was also a synonym for "a trifling thing of small consequence."[1]

Some milk sponge cakes can be topped with avocado crazy, a food in Sri Lankan cuisine.[3] Avocado crazy can be prepared with avocado, cream, sugar and lemon juice.[3] Rum may also be added.[3] Avocado crazy may have a creamy texture and flavor.[3]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "This cake is packed full of vitamin E and essential fatty acids, which help keep the skin looking young and feeling soft, because of the high avocado content."[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Darley, J.J. (1993). Know and Enjoy Tropical Fruit: Tropical Fruit and Nuts: a Cornucopia. P & S Publishing. p. 9. ISBN 978-0-646-13539-7.
  2. ^ Daza, Sandy (March 5, 2015). "Take a bite–new cake discoveries in the city". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved December 12, 2015.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Castella, K. (2010). A World of Cake. Storey Pub. p. 255. ISBN 978-1-60342-576-6.
  4. ^ a b c Hornby, Jane (April 1, 2015). "Chocolate avocado cake". BBC Good Food. Retrieved March 8, 2016.
  5. ^ a b c d e "Raw avocado super-cake". The Independent. December 12, 2015. Retrieved December 12, 2015.
  6. ^ a b "10 Unexpected Ways To Eat Avocados". The Huffington Post. July 29, 2013. Retrieved December 12, 2015.
  7. ^ Kumai, Candice (July 17, 2015). "Vegan Dark Chocolate-Avocado Cake". Yahoo! Style. Retrieved 12 December 2015.
  8. ^ a b Shreeves, Robin (May 6, 2015). "Don't toss that overripe avocado! 7 ways to salvage it". Mother Nature Network. Retrieved March 8, 2016.
  9. ^ Morelan, Jeanette (February 1, 2016). "Unsuspecting Sweets: Most Shared Black Bean Dessert Recipes". The Kansan. Retrieved March 8, 2016.
  10. ^ a b Daly, Emma (March 11, 2015). "MasterChef: Avocado cheesecake doesn't hit the right notes". Radio Times. Retrieved March 8, 2016.
  11. ^ Marshall, Kate (October 21, 2015). "How to grow avocados". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved March 8, 2016.
  12. ^ Stachelski, Deborah (October 23, 2015). "Austin's Most Innovative Executive Chefs". The Huffington Post. Retrieved March 8, 2016.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]