Brazil Davis Cup team

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Brazil
Flag of Brazil.svg
Captain João Zwetsch
ITF ranking
Current ranking 19 Steady
First international
1932
World Group
Appearances 13 (6–13)
Player stats
Most total wins Thomaz Koch (74–44)
Most singles wins Thomaz Koch (46–32)
Most doubles wins Thomaz Koch (28–12)
Best doubles team José Edison Mandarino /
Thomaz Koch (23–9)
Most ties played Thomaz Koch (44)
Most years played Thomaz Koch (16)

The Brazil Davis Cup team represents Brazil in Davis Cup tennis competition and are governed by the Brazilian Tennis Confederation.

After nine years, Brazil returned to the World Group at 2013 with defeat against United States on the first round. Brazil also played in 2015, losing to Argentina.

Current team (2017)[edit]

History[edit]

Brazil competed in its first Davis Cup in 1932.

Results[edit]

Best results[edit]

Year Competition Date Location Opponent Score Result
1992 World Group, 1st Round 2–4 February Rio de Janeiro, Brazil  Germany 3–1 Won
World Group, Quarterfinals 29–31 March Maceio, Brazil  Italy 3–1 Won
World Group, Semifinals 27–29 September Geneve, Switzerland   Switzerland 0–5 Lost
2000 World Group, 1st Round 6–8 February Florianópolis, Brazil  France 4–1 Won
World Group, Quarterfinals 9–11 April Rio de Janeiro, Brazil  Slovakia 3–2 Won
World Group, Semifinals 16–18 July Brisbane, Australia  Australia 0–5 Lost

Recent Results[edit]

Year Competition Date Location Opponent Score Result
2008 Americas Zone, Group I, 1st Round 8–10 February bye
Americas Zone, Group I, 2nd Round 13–15 April Sorocaba, Brazil  Colombia 4–1 Won
World Group, Playoffs 21–23 September Zadar, Croatia  Croatia 1–4 Lost
2009 Americas Zone, Group I, 1st Round 6–8 March bye
Americas Zone, Group I, 2nd Round 10–12 May Tunja, Colombia  Colombia 4–1 Won
World Group, Playoffs 20–22 September Porto Alegre, Brazil  Ecuador 2–3 Lost
2010 Americas Zone, Group I, 1st Round 5–7 March bye
Americas Zone, Group I, 2nd Round 09–11 May Bauru, Brazil  Uruguay 5–0 Won
World Group Playoffs 19–21 September Chennai, India  India 2–3 Lost
2011 Americas Zone, Group I, 1st Round 4–6 March bye
Americas Zone, Group I, 2nd Round 8–10 Jul Montevideo, Uruguay  Uruguay 5–0 Won
World Group Playoffs 16–18 September Kazan, Russia  Russia 2–3 Lost
2012 Americas Zone, Group I, 1st Round 10–12 February bye
Americas Zone, Group I, 2nd Round 6–8 April São José do Rio Preto, Brazil  Colombia 4–1 Won
World Group Playoffs 14–16 September São José do Rio Preto, Brazil  Russia 5–0 Won
2013 World Group, 1st Round 1–3 February Jacksonville, United States  United States 2-3 Lost
World Group Playoffs 13–15 September Ulm, Germany  Germany 1-4 Lost
2014 Americas Zone, Group I, 1st Round 31–2 February bye
Americas Zone, Group I, 2nd Round 4–6 April Guayaquil, Ecuador  Ecuador 3–1 Won
World Group Playoffs 12–14 September São Paulo, Brazil  Spain 3–1 Won
2015 World Group, 1st Round 6–8 March Buenos Aires, Argentina  Argentina 2–3 Lost
World Group Playoffs 18–20 September Florianópolis, Brazil  Croatia 1–3 Lost
2016 Americas Zone, Group I, 1st Round 4–6 March bye
Americas Zone, Group I, 2nd Round 15–18 July Belo Horizonte, Brazil  Ecuador 3–1 Won
World Group Playoffs 16–18 September Ostend, Belgium  Belgium 0–4 Lost
2017 Americas Zone, Group I, 1st Round 3–5 February bye
Americas Zone, Group I, 2nd Round 7–9 April TBD, Ecuador  Ecuador

Former squad members[edit]

Active single players listed in bold and active double players listed also in italic; active player rankings (in parentheses) as of February 22, 2016

Player First Year Played Years Played Number of ties Total W-L Singles W-L Doubles W-L
Tomas Koch (1962) 16 44 74–44 46–32 28–12
José Edison Mandarino (1961) 15 43 68–42 41–31 27–11
Carlos Kirmayr (1971) 14 28 34–22 17–15 17–7
Cássio Motta (1979) 11 27 28–21 13–16 15–5
Jaime Oncins (1991) 11 25 23–14 12–8 11–6
Gustavo Kuerten (1996) 11 23 34–18 21–11 13–7
Luiz Mattar (1986) 9 20 20–18 16–15 4–3
Fernando Meligeni (1993) 10 19 13–16 13–16 0–0
André Sá (1997) 9 18 14–10 4–4 10–6
Carlos Alberto Fernandes (1957) 8 16 25–15 16–10 9–5
Thomaz Bellucci (35) (2007) 9 16 18–13 17–13 1–0
Marcelo Melo (1) (2008) 8 15 13–3 1–0 12–3
Ronald Barnes (1958) 8 14 16–18 1–7 9–5
Bruno Soares (10) (2005) 7 13 13–2 2–0 11–2
Fernando Roese (1982) 8 13 6–9 2–1 4–8
Marcos Hocevar (1978) 5 10 7–9 7–8 0–1
Flávio Saretta (2002) 5 10 10–5 9–5 1–0
Ricardo Mello (2005) 4 10 8–6 8–6 0–0
Luis Felipe Tavares (1966) 7 9 5–7 4–5 1–2
Armando Vieira (1951) 5 9 13–11 10–5 3–6
Nelson Aerts (1984) 3 5 5–2 3–1 2–1
Jose Aguero (1955) 3 5 2–4 2–4 0–0
Marcos Daniel (2004) 5 5 5–2 4–2 1–0
Rogério Dutra (114) (2011) 4 5 6–3 6–3 0–0
Ricardo Acioly (1987) 3 4 1–3 0–0 1–3
Robert Falkenburg (1954) 2 4 3–7 2–4 1–3
Alexandre Simoni (2001) 3 4 2–3 0–2 2–1
Dacio Campos (1985) 1 3 4–2 3–2 1–0
Ney Keller (1979) 1 3 2–1 0–0 2–1
João Souza (211) (2012) 2 3 2–3 2–3 0–0
Danilo Marcelino (1989) 2 3 1–3 0–2 1–1
Roberto Cardozo (1951) 1 2 0–2 0–2 0–0
Fernando Gentil (1976) 2 2 2–0 1–0 1–0
Júlio Góes (1977) 2 2 1–2 1–2 0–0
Ivan Kley (1987) 2 2 0–5 0–4 0–1
Mauro Menezes (1990) 2 2 1–2 0–1 1–1
Ronald Moreira (1955) 1 2 3–2 2–1 1–1

See also[edit]

External links[edit]