Fluocinonide

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Fluocinonide
Fluocinonide.png
Clinical data
Trade namesFluonex, Lidex, others[1]
AHFS/Drugs.comMicromedex Detailed Consumer Information
MedlinePlusa601054
Routes of
administration
Topical
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
  • AU: S4 (Prescription only)
  • UK: POM (Prescription only)
  • US: ℞-only
Pharmacokinetic data
Metabolismhepatic
Identifiers
  • 6α,9-difluoro-11β,16α,17,21-tetrahydroxypregna-1,4-diene-3,20-dione, cyclic 16,17-acetal with acetone,21-acetate
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.005.998 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC26H32F2O7
Molar mass494.532 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • O=C(OCC(=O)[C@]45OC(O[C@@H]5C[C@@H]2[C@@]4(C[C@H](O)[C@]3(F)[C@]/1(/C=C\C(=O)\C=C\1[C@@H](F)C[C@@H]23)C)C)(C)C)C
  • InChI=1S/C26H32F2O7/c1-13(29)33-12-20(32)26-21(34-22(2,3)35-26)10-15-16-9-18(27)17-8-14(30)6-7-23(17,4)25(16,28)19(31)11-24(15,26)5/h6-8,15-16,18-19,21,31H,9-12H2,1-5H3/t15-,16-,18-,19-,21+,23-,24-,25-,26+/m0/s1 checkY
  • Key:WJOHZNCJWYWUJD-IUGZLZTKSA-N checkY
  (verify)

Fluocinonide (sold under various brand names) is a potent glucocorticoid used topically as an anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment of skin disorders such as eczema and seborrhoeic dermatitis.[2] It relieves itching, redness, dryness, crusting, scaling, inflammation, and discomfort.[2]

A common potential adverse effect is skin atrophy (thinning of the skin).[3] Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids can produce reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) suppression, manifestations of Cushing's syndrome, hyperglycemia, and glucosuria.[medical citation needed]

In 2020, it was the 280th most commonly prescribed medication in the United States, with more than 1 million prescriptions.[4][5]

Veterinary uses[edit]

Fluocinonide is used in veterinary medicine. It is a treatment for allergies in dogs.[6] Natural systemic cortisol concentrations can be suppressed for weeks after one week of topical exposure.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ MedlinePlus Drug Information: Fluocinonide Topical
  2. ^ a b "Fluocinonide Topical: MedlinePlus Drug Information". medlineplus.gov. Retrieved 2022-11-16.
  3. ^ Jablonska, S.; Groniowska, M.; Dabroswki, J. (February 1979). "Comparative evaluation of skin atrophy in man induced by topical corticoids". The British Journal of Dermatology. 100 (2): 193–206. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2133.1979.tb05561.x. ISSN 0007-0963. PMID 154921.
  4. ^ "The Top 300 of 2020". ClinCalc. Retrieved 7 October 2022.
  5. ^ "Fluocinonide - Drug Usage Statistics". ClinCalc. Retrieved 7 October 2022.
  6. ^ Dog Allergies www.squidoo.com/dogallergy
  7. ^ Zenoble RD, Kemppainen RJ (September 1987). "Adrenocortical suppression by topically applied corticosteroids in healthy dogs". Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 191 (6): 685–8. PMID 2824410.

External links[edit]

  • "Fluocinonide". Drug Information Portal. U.S. National Library of Medicine.