Harriet Edquist

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Harriet Edquist
NationalityAustralian
EducationSt Catherine's School, Toorak
Alma materMonash University,
RMIT University
AwardsBates Smart National Award for Architecture in the Media
Scientific career
InstitutionsRMIT University

Harriet Edquist is an Australian curator, and Professor of Architectural History in the School of Architecture and Design at RMIT University in Melbourne.[1] Born and educated in Melbourne, she has both published widely on and created numerous exhibitions in the field of Australian (in particular, Victorian) architecture, art and design history. She also contributes to the production of Australian architectural knowledge as a director of the RMIT Design Archives and is a member of the Design Research Institute at RMIT University.

Education[edit]

Edquist graduated from St Catherine's School, Toorak in 1965.[2] She then studied for a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in Classics from Monash University, and completed a PhD in Architectural History at RMIT University.

Academic career[edit]

Edquist began her teaching career as a lecturer in the Department of Fine Arts, University of Melbourne, and specialised in Renaissance and modern art history.

In 1987, she joined RMIT University as editor (with Karen Burns) of Transition: Discourse on Architecture; a quarterly magazine produced by the Department of Architecture from 1979 until 2000 and dedicated to discourse on contemporary architectural practice and theory.[3] Serving from 1987 to 1991, the partnership of Edquist and Karen Burns stretched the critical range of this publication, arguing - as they wrote in their editorial for Transition 38 - that architectural discourse could extend "the boundaries of discussion to include all the arts and observations on the society".[4] They were both subsequently replaced as editors of Transition following a controversial 're-setting' of the publication's agenda, which was played out publicly through editorials and letters.[5]

In 1988, Edquist was appointed lecturer in Architectural History by RMIT University and from 2001 to 2007 served as Head of the School of Architecture and Design. She now holds the positions of Professor of Architectural History at RMIT University, and director of the RMIT Design Archives.[6]

She is currently a member (and was the past President from 2003 to 2005) of SAHANZ, the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand.[7] Professor Edquist is also a member of Docomomo Australia.

In June 2015, she became the Foundation President of Automotive Historians Australia.[8] This new organisation focusses on Australian automative history and was launched alongside Shifting Gear: Design, Innovation and the Australian car, an exhibition curated by Edquist in conjunction with David Hurlston.

Curated exhibitions[edit]

Selected recent publications *[edit]

  • 2014 'Architecture and design' In: Encyclopedia of Women and Leadership in Twentieth Century, Australian Women's Archives Project 2014, Australia[19]
  • 2013 'Frederick Romberg (1913-1992): an architectural survey' In: Frederick Romberg. An Architecture of Migration 1938-1975, Melbourne, Australia - with Spooner, M., Deverell, K., Banham, S., Ashton, K., and Tsolakis, L.)
  • 2013 Building a new world: a history of the state library of Victoria 1853-1913, State Library of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia[20]
  • 2013 '"An architecture to excite an interest": grand visions for Melbourne's public library' In: The La Trobe Journal,[21] 52 - 61
  • 2013 'The architectural legacy of the Scots in the western district of Victoria, Australia' In: Architectural Heritage, 24, 67 - 85[22]
  • 2011 Michael O'Connell: The Lost Modernist, Melbourne Books, Melbourne, Australia[23]
  • 2010 Designing Place: An Archaeology of the Western District, Melbourne Books, Melbourne Australia - with Lisa Byrne and Laurene Vaughan
  • 2008 Pioneers of Modernism. The Arts and Crafts Movement in Australia, Miegunyah Press, Melbourne Australia
  • 2004 Harold Desbrowe-Annear: a life in architecture, Miegunyah Press, Melbourne, Australia[24]

Awards and honours[edit]

In 1992, Edquist was awarded the Bates Smart National Award for Architecture in the Media, for her work editing Transition: Discourse on Architecture.[6] Edquist also shared this role with fellow architecture academic Karen Burns.

In 2004, she was also awarded a Bates Smart National Award for Architecture in the Media, for her work writing the book Harold Desbrowe-Annear: A Life in Architecture.[24][25]

Edquist was awarded an Honorary Fellow at the Australian Institute of Architects in 2006, for services to architectural education and history. She is also an Honours Committee chair of the Victorian Chapter of the Australian Institute of Architects.

She is a member of the International Confederation of Architectural Museums, and a founding member of its Australian counterpart, icam Australia.

In 2016 Edquist was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities (FAHA).[26]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Staff Profile: Professor Harriet Edquist". Retrieved 29 April 2018.
  2. ^ "Nil Magnum Nisi Bonum". St Catherines School. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  3. ^ a b "Companion City | ACCA". www.accaonline.org.au. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  4. ^ Sawyer, Mark (2015). "Call-and-Response: Group Formation and Agency enacted through an Architectural Magazine, its Letters and Editorials" (PDF). Architecture Institutions and Change, Proceedings of SAHANZ. 32: 553. ISBN 978 0 646 94298 8. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  5. ^ Sawyer, Mark (2015). "Call-and-Response: Group Formation and Agency enacted through an Architectural Magazine, its Letters and Editorials" (PDF). Architecture Institutions and Change, Proceedings of SAHANZ. 32: 554. ISBN 978 0 646 94298 8. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  6. ^ a b "RMIT Academic Profile: Professor Harriet Edquist". Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  7. ^ "About SAHANZ". www.sahanz.net. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  8. ^ "OFFICE BEARERS/ COMMITTEE". Automotive Historians Australia Inc. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  9. ^ "Historyonics: Australia's first public library". Radio National. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  10. ^ Sorensen, Rosemary. "In search of the lost modernist of design". The Australian. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  11. ^ "Michael O'Connell: The Lost Modernist". ArchitectureAU. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  12. ^ "A skilled hand and cultivated mind: a guide to the architecture and art of RMIT University". English Worldwide. 27 January 2015. Retrieved 31 May 2019.
  13. ^ "The architecture of Neil Clerehan". English Worldwide. 27 January 2015. Retrieved 31 May 2019.
  14. ^ Edquist, Harriet. Kurt Popper : from Vienna to Melbourne, architecture 1939-1975 / Harriet Edquist. Melbourne, Vic: RMIT School of Architecture + Design. ISBN 0864592256.
  15. ^ a b "Headlines". ArchitectureAU. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  16. ^ "Stanhill: 14 images by Wolfgang Sievers of Frederick Romberg's Stanhill Flats, 1951; event at Design and Art Australia Online". www.daao.org.au. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  17. ^ "George Baldessin: an exhibition of drawings event at Design and Art Australia Online". www.daao.org.au. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  18. ^ "Robin Boyd : the architect as critic / an exhibition at the La Trobe Library, State Library of Victoria - Details - Trove". trove.nla.gov.au. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  19. ^ Melbourne, The University of. "Architecture and Design - Theme - The Encyclopedia of Women and Leadership in Twentieth-Century Australia". www.womenaustralia.info. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  20. ^ "Building a new world: a history of the State Library of Victoria 1853–1913". State Library Victoria. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  21. ^ "Home - La Trobe Journal". latrobejournal.slv.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  22. ^ "The Architectural Legacy of the Scots in the Western District of Victoria, Australia". Architectural Heritage. 24 (1): 67–85. 1 November 2013. doi:10.3366/arch.2013.0046. ISSN 1350-7524.
  23. ^ "Michael O'Connell : the lost modernist / Harriet Edquist. - Version details - Trove". trove.nla.gov.au. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  24. ^ a b Edquist, Harriet (2004). Harold Desbrowe-Annear: A Life in Architecture. Carlton, VIC, Australia: The Miegunyah Press. ISBN 9780522850529.
  25. ^ Underhill, Nancy (2005). "Harold Desbrowe-Annear, a life in architecture - a review". Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  26. ^ "Harriet Edquist". Australian Academy of the Humanities. Retrieved 1 March 2018.