Linux kernel version history

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This article documents the version history of the Linux kernel. The Linux kernel is a free and open-source, monolithic, Unix-like operating system kernel. It was conceived and created in 1991 by Linus Torvalds.[1]

Linux kernels have different support levels depending on the version. Usually, each stable version continues to backport bug fixes from the mainline until the next stable version is released. However, if a stable version has been designated as a long-term support (LTS) kernel, it will be maintained for an extra few years.[2] After that, versions designated as Super-Long-Term Support (SLTS) will then be maintained by the Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) for many more years.[3]

Releases 6.x.y[edit]

Version Original release date Last release Maintainer EOL Prominent features Notes
Latest preview version of a future release: 6.8 TBA Linus Torvalds
Current stable version: 6.7 8 January 2024[2] 6.7.6[4] Edit this on Wikidata Linus Torvalds
  • Initial Bcachefs filesystem support[5]
  • Itanium support removed[5]
  • Intel Meteor Lake Graphics declared stable[5]
  • Initial Nouveau support for Nvidia GSP firmware[5]
  • Ability to disable IA-32 support at boot time on AMD64[6]
  • Expansion of AMD Seamless Boot Support[6]
  • Improvement in loading of x86 microcode[6]
  • Support for RAID strip-tree, simple quota accounting, and temporary FSID added to Btrfs[7]
  • JFS minor stability improvements[6]
According to Linus Torvalds, "one of the largest kernel releases we've ever had"[5]
Older version, yet still maintained: 6.6 30 October 2023[2] 6.6.18[8] Greg Kroah-Hartman & Sasha Levin December 2026
  • The new EEVDF process scheduler was merged: Mostly as an improvement to the older CFS scheduler code.
  • Intel Shadow Stack was finally merged; Exploiting ROPs is now harder
  • Support for Partial SMT
  • Performance Improvement for CPUs with a lot of cores and shared Last Level Caches
  • Continued Intel Meteor Lake graphics and sound enablement/improvements.
  • Better performance for Ext4; IO_uring also seeing cool improvements
  • DEFLATE compression support for EROFS.
24th LTS release

The CFS scheduler was the de facto standard for 16+ years! ReiserFS is now declared to be obsolete and flagged for removal in 2025. Hans Reiser himself commented on this.

Old version, no longer maintained: 6.5 27 August 2023[2] 6.5.13[8] 28 November 2023[9]
Old version, no longer maintained: 6.4 25 June 2023[2] 6.4.16[8] 13 September 2023[10]
Old version, no longer maintained: 6.3 23 April 2023[2] 6.3.13[8] 11 July 2023[14]
  • More Rust in the kernel
  • Initial Support for Intel Meteor Lake Display
  • Intel Meteor Lake VPUs ("Versatile Processing Unit") support
  • AMD Automatic IBRS
  • Intel TPMI driver was merged, hopes are this will give more control over power management.
  • Big Performance Improvement for EXT4. Nice Improvements for BTRFS too
  • IPv4 BIG TCP support, maybe better network performance
  • Microsoft Hyper-V nested hypervisor support.
  • Faster kernel builds and with lower peak memory use.
  • Removed support for the Intel ICC compiler.
Old version, no longer maintained: 6.2 19 February 2023[2] 6.2.16[8] May 2023[15]
  • Intel Arc drivers are now deemed "stable" and on by default.
  • Initial FOSS support for NVIDIA GeForce 30 Series. But performance is poor for now.
  • Support for Apple's M1
  • Call Depth Tracking as a better performance alternative to IBRS for older Intel CPUs
  • Some Power-savings improvements when the system is idle or lightly loaded.
  • Support for running Raspberry Pi in 4K@60Hz
  • Better performance and scalability for running RAID5/6 in btrfs-like systems
  • Even more Rust in the kernel
Older version, yet still maintained: 6.1 11 December 2022[16] 6.1.79[8] December 2026[2]

August 2033[17]

23rd LTS release
Used in Debian 12 "Bookworm"[22]

4th SLTS release (which CIP[23] is planning[17] to support until August 2033)

6.1.28 is named Curry Ramen[24]

Old version, no longer maintained: 6.0 2 October 2022[25] 6.0.19[26] January 2023[26]
  • Performance improvements on Intel Xeon 'Ice Lake', AMD Ryzen 'Threadripper', AMD EPYC[27]
  • New hardware support including Intel, AMD, Qualcomm[28]
Named "Hurr durr I'ma [sic] ninja sloth"[29]
Legend:
Old version
Older version, still maintained
Latest version
Latest preview version
Future release

Releases 5.x.y[edit]

Version Original release date Last release Maintainer EOL Prominent features Notes
Old version, no longer maintained: 5.19 31 July 2022[30] 5.19.17[31] Linus Torvalds October 2022[31]
  • Initial support for LoongArch[32][33]
  • Support for Big TCP[32][33]
  • More secure encrypted virtualization with AMD SEV-SNP and Intel TDX[32][33]
  • Armv9 Scalable Matrix Extension support[33]
  • Introduce Intel In-Field Scan driver to run targeted low level diagnostics outside of the CPU's architectural error detection capabilities[32]
  • a.out support removed[34]
Old version, no longer maintained: 5.18 22 May 2022[35] 5.18.19[36] Greg Kroah-Hartman & Sasha Levin[2] August 2022[36]
  • Support for Indirect Branch Tracking[37] on Intel CPUs[38]
  • User events[39]
  • fprobe, for probing multiple functions with a single probe handler[40]
  • Headers rearchitecturing preparations for faster compilation times[41]
  • Stricter memcpy() compile-time bounds checking[42]
  • Switch to C11[43]
Old version, no longer maintained: 5.17 20 March 2022[44] 5.17.15[45] June 2022[45]
  • BPF CO-RE support[46][47]
  • Random number generator improvements[48]
  • New Real-Time Linux Analysis (RTLA) tool[49]
  • Support giving names to anonymous memory[50]
  • Mitigate straight-line speculation attacks[51]
Used in Ubuntu 22.04 LTS on newer hardware[52]

Named Superb Owl[53]

Old version, no longer maintained: 5.16 9 January 2022[54] 5.16.20[55] April 2022[55]
  • New futex_waitv() system call for faster game performance[56]
  • Memory folios infrastructure for a faster memory management[57]
  • Add support for AMX instructions[58]
  • Improve write congestion[59]
Older version, yet still maintained: 5.15 31 October 2021[60] 5.15.149[8] October 2026[2]
  • New NTFS file system implementation
  • ksmbd, an in-kernel SMB 3 server
  • Migrate memory pages to persistent memory in lieu of discard[61]
  • DAMON, a data access monitor
  • Introduce process_mrelease(2) system call[62]
22nd LTS release; used in

Named Trick or Treat[65]

Old version, no longer maintained: 5.14 29 August 2021[66] 5.14.21[67] Greg Kroah-Hartman November 2021[67] Used in RHEL 9.x and derivatives[68] (Redhat ignores LTS-Kernel, own kernel-backports) and SLE 15 SP4/openSUSE Leap 15.4
Old version, no longer maintained: 5.13 27 June 2021[69] 5.13.19[70] Greg Kroah-Hartman & Sasha Levin September 2021[70] Named Opossums on Parade
Old version, no longer maintained: 5.12 25 April 2021[71] 5.12.19[72] Greg Kroah-Hartman July 2021[72] Named Frozen Wasteland[73][74]
Old version, no longer maintained: 5.11 14 February 2021[75] 5.11.22[76] May 2021[76] Named "💕 Valentine's Day Edition 💕"[77]
Older version, yet still maintained: 5.10 13 December 2020[78] 5.10.210[8] Greg Kroah-Hartman & Sasha Levin[2] December 2026[2][79]

January 2031[17]

21st LTS release; used in Debian 11 "Bullseye"[80]

3rd SLTS release (which CIP[81] is planning[17] to support until January 2031)

Named "Dare mighty things"[82]

Old version, no longer maintained: 5.9 11 October 2020[83] 5.9.16[84] Greg Kroah-Hartman December 2020[84]
Old version, no longer maintained: 5.8 2 August 2020[85] 5.8.18[86] November 2020[86]
Old version, no longer maintained: 5.7 31 May 2020[87] 5.7.19[88] August 2020[88]
Old version, no longer maintained: 5.6 29 March 2020[89] 5.6.19[90] June 2020[90]
Old version, no longer maintained: 5.5 26 January 2020[91] 5.5.19[92] April 2020[92]
Older version, yet still maintained: 5.4 24 November 2019[93] 5.4.269[8] Greg Kroah-Hartman & Sasha Levin[2] December 2025[2] 20th LTS release, used in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS
5.4-rc2 is named Nesting Opossum[94]

5.4-rc5 is named Kleptomaniac Octopus[95]

Old version, no longer maintained: 5.3 15 September 2019[96] 5.3.18[97] Greg Kroah-Hartman December 2019[97]
Old version, no longer maintained: 5.2 7 July 2019[98] 5.2.20[99] October 2019[99] 5.2-rc2 is named Golden Lions[100][101]

5.2 is named Bobtail Squid[102]

Old version, no longer maintained: 5.1 5 May 2019[103] 5.1.21[104] July 2019[104]
  • io_uring API, a new way to do asynchronous I/O (AIO),[105] the older API/interface "aio" had problems and performance issues.
Old version, no longer maintained: 5.0 3 March 2019[106] 5.0.21[107] June 2019[107]
Legend:
Old version
Older version, still maintained
Latest version
Latest preview version
Future release

Releases 4.x.y[edit]

Version Original release date Last release Maintainer EOL Notes
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.20 23 December 2018[108] 4.20.17[109] Greg Kroah-Hartman March 2019[109] Named Shy Crocodile[110]
Older version, yet still maintained: 4.19 22 October 2018[111] 4.19.307[8] Greg Kroah-Hartman & Sasha Levin[2] December 2024[2][112]

January 2029[17]

19th LTS release. Used in Debian 10 "Buster".[113] Second SLTS release (which CIP is planning[17] to support until January 2029), and first with ARM64 support.[114] Named "People's Front"[115]
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.18 12 August 2018[116] 4.18.20[117] Greg Kroah-Hartman November 2018[117] RHEL 8.x (Redhat ignores LTS-Kernel, own kernel-backports)
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.17 3 June 2018[118] 4.17.19[119] August 2018[119] Named Merciless Moray[120]
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.16 1 April 2018[121] 4.16.18[122] June 2018[122]
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.15 28 January 2018[123] 4.15.18[124] April 2018[124] Used in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.14 12 November 2017[125] 4.14.336[126] Greg Kroah-Hartman & Sasha Levin[2] January 2024[126] 18th LTS release

4.14.1 is named Petit Gorille[127]

Old version, no longer maintained: 4.13 3 September 2017[128] 4.13.16[129] Greg Kroah-Hartman November 2017[129]
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.12 2 July 2017[130] 4.12.14[131] September 2017[131]
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.11 30 April 2017[132] 4.11.12[133] July 2017[133]
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.10 19 February 2017[134] 4.10.17[135] May 2017[135] 4.10-rc5 was named Anniversary Edition[136]

4.10-rc6 was named Fearless Coyote[137]

Old version, no longer maintained: 4.9 11 December 2016[138] 4.9.337[8] Greg Kroah-Hartman & Sasha Levin[2] January 2023[2][139] 17th LTS release. Used in Debian 9 "Stretch".[140] Named Roaring Lionus[141][142]
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.8 25 September 2016[143] 4.8.17[144] Greg Kroah-Hartman January 2017[144]
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.7 24 July 2016[145] 4.7.10[146] October 2016[146] Named Psychotic Stoned Sheep[147]
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.6 15 May 2016[148] 4.6.7[149] August 2016[149] Named Charred Weasel[150]
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.5 13 March 2016[151] 4.5.7[152] June 2016[153]
Older version, yet still maintained: 4.4 10 January 2016[154] 4.4.302[155]

4.4.302-cip80[156]

Greg Kroah-Hartman & Sasha Levin[2] (until February 2022[155])

Nobuhiro Iwamatsu & Pavel Machek[17]

January 2027[17] 16th LTS release, used in Slackware 14.2.[157] Canonical provided extended support until April 2021.[158] As the first kernel selected for Super Long Term Support (SLTS), the Civil Infrastructure Platform will provide support until at least 2026.[3] Used in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.3 1 November 2015[159] 4.3.6[160] Greg Kroah-Hartman February 2016[161] Named Blurry Fish Butt[162][163]
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.2 30 August 2015[164] 4.2.8[165] December 2015[165] Canonical provided extended support until July 2016.[166][167]
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.1 22 June 2015[168] 4.1.52[169] Sasha Levin[2][170] (formerly Greg Kroah-Hartman)[171] May 2018[169] 15th LTS release. 4.1.1 was named Series 4800[172]
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.0 12 April 2015[173] 4.0.9[174] Greg Kroah-Hartman July 2015[175] Named "Hurr durr I'ma [sic] sheep"[176] (Internet poll)
Legend:
Old version
Older version, still maintained
Latest version
Latest preview version
Future release

Releases 3.x.y[edit]

The jump from 2.6.x to 3.x wasn't because of a breaking update, but rather the first release of a new versioning scheme introduced as a more convenient system.[177]

Version Original release date Last release Maintainer EOL Notes
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.19 8 February 2015[178] 3.19.8[179] Greg Kroah-Hartman May 2015[179] Canonical provided extended support until July 2016.[166][180]
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.18 7 December 2014[181] 3.18.140[182] Greg Kroah-Hartman[183] (formerly Sasha Levin[184]) (formerly Greg Kroah-Hartman) January 2017[185] 14th LTS release, named Diseased Newt[186]

Hartman stated that he will release irregular updates to the 3.18 tree.[187] Starting with 3.18.140, this version will no longer be maintained on kernel.org, but on AOSP

Old version, no longer maintained: 3.17 5 October 2014[188] 3.17.8[189] Greg Kroah-Hartman January 2015[189]
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.16 3 August 2014[190] 3.16.85[191] Ben Hutchings[2][192] (formerly Greg Kroah-Hartman) Maintained until October 2014, then May 2016 to June 2020[191][2][193] 13th LTS release. Was used in Debian 8 "Jessie".[194] Canonical provided extended support until April 2016.[166][195]

3.16.1 was named Museum of Fishiegoodies[196]

Old version, no longer maintained: 3.15 8 June 2014[197] 3.15.10[198] Greg Kroah-Hartman August 2014[198]
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.14 30 March 2014[199] 3.14.79[200] Greg Kroah-Hartman[2] August 2016[200] 12th LTS release, named Shuffling Zombie Juror[201]
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.13 19 January 2014[202] 3.13.11[203] Greg Kroah-Hartman April 2014[203] Canonical provided extended support until April 2016.[166][204] Named One Giant Leap for Frogkind[205] (NASA LADEE launch photo)[206] Used in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.12 3 November 2013[207] 3.12.74[208] Jiří Slabý[2][209] (formerly Greg Kroah-Hartman) May 2017[209][208] 11th LTS release, named Suicidal Squirrel[210]
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.11 2 September 2013[211] 3.11.10[212] Greg Kroah-Hartman November 2013[212] Canonical provided extended support until August 2014.[166] Named Linux for Workgroups after the 20 years of Windows 3.11[213]
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.10 30 June 2013[214] 3.10.108[215] Willy Tarreau[2][216] (formerly Greg Kroah-Hartman) November 2017[215] 10th LTS release,
3.10.6 was named TOSSUG Baby Fish[217][218][219] used in Slackware 14.1[220]

RHEL 7.x

Old version, no longer maintained: 3.9 28 April 2013[221] 3.9.11[222] Greg Kroah-Hartman July 2013[222] 3.9.6 was named Black Squirrel Wakeup Call[223]
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.8 18 February 2013[224] 3.8.13[225] Greg Kroah-Hartman May 2013[225] Canonical provided extended support until August 2014.[166][226]

Named Unicycling Gorilla[227][228]
3.8.5 was named Displaced Humerus Anterior[229]

Old version, no longer maintained: 3.7 10 December 2012[230] 3.7.10[231] Greg Kroah-Hartman March 2013[231][232] Named Terrified Chipmunk[233][234]
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.6 30 September 2012[235] 3.6.11[236] Greg Kroah-Hartman December 2012[236]
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.5 21 July 2012[237] 3.5.7[238] Greg Kroah-Hartman October 2012[238] Canonical provided extended support until April 2014.[166][239]
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.4 20 May 2012[240][241] 3.4.113[242] Li Zefan[2][243] (formerly Greg Kroah-Hartman) October 2016[244] 9th LTS release
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.3 18 March 2012[245] 3.3.8[246] Greg Kroah-Hartman June 2012[246]
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.2 4 January 2012[247] 3.2.102[248] Ben Hutchings[2][249] May 2018[250] 8th LTS release, used in Ubuntu 12.04 LTS[251] and optionally in 12.04 ESM,[252] Debian 7 "Wheezy" and Slackware 14.0.[2][249] Canonical promised to (at least) provide long-term support until April 2017;[166] Support has continued for months after.

3.2 to 3.5 was named Saber-toothed Squirrel[253]

Old version, no longer maintained: 3.1 24 October 2011[254] 3.1.10[255] Greg Kroah-Hartman January 2012[255] 3.1 provided the base for real-time tree.
3.1-rc2 was named Wet Seal
3.1 was named Divemaster Edition[256] (Linus' diving activities)
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.0 21 July 2011[177] 3.0.101[257] Greg Kroah-Hartman[258] October 2013[257][258] 7th LTS release
Named Sneaky Weasel[259][260]
Legend:
Old version
Older version, still maintained
Latest version
Latest preview version
Future release

Releases 2.6.x.y[edit]

Versions 2.6.16 and 2.6.27 of the Linux kernel were unofficially given long-term support (LTS),[261] before a 2011 working group in the Linux Foundation started a formal long-term support initiative.[262][263]

Version Original release date Last release Maintainer EOL Notes
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.39 18 May 2011[264] 2.6.39.4[265] Greg Kroah-Hartman August 2011[265] Last stable release of the 2.6 kernel series
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.38 14 March 2011[266] 2.6.38.8[267] June 2011[267] Named Flesh-Eating Bats with Fangs[268]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.37 4 January 2011[269] 2.6.37.6[270] March 2011[270]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.36 20 October 2010[271] 2.6.36.4[272] February 2011[272]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.35 1 August 2010[273] 2.6.35.14[274] Andi Kleen[275] March 2012[275] 6th LTS release
2.6.35.7 was named Yokohama
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.34 16 May 2010[276] 2.6.34.15[277] Paul Gortmaker[278] February 2014[277][278] 5th LTS release
It was named Sheep on Meth[279][280]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.33 24 February 2010[281] 2.6.33.20[282] Greg Kroah-Hartman[283] November 2011[282] 4th LTS release. It was the base for real-time-tree, replaced by 3.0.x.[283]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.32 2 December 2009[284] 2.6.32.71[285] Willy Tarreau[2][286] (formerly Greg Kroah-Hartman)[287][288] March 2016[2] 3rd LTS release, used in Debian 6 Squeeze.[289] Canonical also provided support until April 2015.[166]

RHEL 6.x

Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.31 9 September 2009[290] 2.6.31.14[291] Greg Kroah-Hartman July 2010[291]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.30 9 June 2009[292] 2.6.30.9[293] October 2009[293] 2.6.30-rc4–2.6.30-rc6 was named

Vindictive Armadillo[294][295]
Releases between 2.6 and 2.9 were named 2.Man-Eating Seals of Antiquity[296]

Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.29 23 March 2009[297] 2.6.29.6[298] July 2009[298] Named Temporary Tasmanian Devil[299][300]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.28 24 December 2008[301] 2.6.28.10[302] May 2009[302] 2.6.28-rc1–2.6.28-rc6 was named Killer Bat of Doom[303][304]

2.6.28 was named Erotic Pickled Herring[305]

Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.27 9 October 2008[306] 2.6.27.62[307] Willy Tarreau[308] (formerly Adrian Bunk,[309] and formerly Greg Kroah-Hartman) March 2012[309] 2nd LTS release
2.6.27.3 was named Trembling Tortoise[310]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.26 13 July 2008[311] 2.6.26.8[312] Greg Kroah-Hartman November 2008[312] 2.6.26–2.6.27 was named Rotary Wombat[313]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.25 16 April 2008[314] 2.6.25.20[315] November 2008[315] Named Funky Weasel is Jiggy wit it[316]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.24 24 January 2008[317] 2.6.24.7[318] May 2008[318] 2.6.23-rc4–2.6.23-rc6 was named Pink Farting Weasel[319]

2.6.23-rc7–2.6.23–2.6.24 was named Arr Matey! A Hairy Bilge Rat![320] (TLAPD 2007)
2.6.24.1 was named Err Metey! A Heury Beelge-a Ret![321]

Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.23 9 October 2007[322] 2.6.23.17[323] February 2008[323]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.22 8 July 2007[324] 2.6.22.19[325] February 2008[325] 2.6.22-rc3–2.6.22-rc4 was named Jeff Thinks I Should Change This, But To What?

2.6.22-rc5–2.6.22 was named Holy Dancing Manatees, Batman![326]

Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.21 25 April 2007[327] 2.6.21.7[328] August 2007[328] Named Nocturnal Monster Puppy[329]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.20 4 February 2007[330] 2.6.20.21[331] October 2007[331] Named Homicidal Dwarf Hamster[332][333]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.19 29 November 2006[334] 2.6.19.7[335] March 2007[335] Named Avast! A bilge rat! (TLAPD 2006)[336]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.18 20 September 2006[337] 2.6.18.8[338] February 2007[338]

2.6.18: RHEL 5.x

Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.17 17 June 2006[339] 2.6.17.14[340] October 2006[340] 2.6.17-rc5 was named Lordi Rules[341] (Eurovision 2006 winners)[342]

2.6.17-rc6–2.6.17 was named Crazed Snow-Weasel[343]

Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.16 20 March 2006[344] 2.6.16.62[345] Adrian Bunk[346] (formerly Greg Kroah-Hartman)[287] July 2008[347][345] 1st LTS release
2.6.16.28-rc2 was named Stable Penguin
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.15 2 January 2006[348] 2.6.15.7[349] Greg Kroah-Hartman May 2006[349] Named Sliding Snow Leopard[350]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.14 27 October 2005[351] 2.6.14.7[352] January 2006[352] Named Affluent Albatross[353]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.13 28 August 2005[354] 2.6.13.5[355] December 2005[355] Named Woozy Numbat[356][357]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.12 18 June 2005[358] 2.6.12.6[359][360] August 2005[359]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6.11 2 March 2005[361] 2.6.11.12[362] June 2005[362]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.6 17 December 2003[363] 2.6.10[364] Linus Torvalds December 2004[364] 2.6.2–2.6.4 was named Feisty Dunnart[365]

2.6.5–2.6.9 was named Zonked Quokka[366]

2.6.9: RHEL 4.x

Legend:
Old version
Older version, still maintained
Latest version
Latest preview version
Future release

Releases up to 2.6.0[edit]

Version Original release date Last release Maintainer EOL Notes
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.4 4 January 2001[367] 2.4.37.11[368] Willy Tarreau (formerly Marcelo Tosatti) December 2011[368] Named Greased Turkey[369]
last stable release of the 2.4 kernel series.

2.4.9: RHEL 2.1
2.4.10: Featured a complete rewrite of the Virtual Memory Management (VMM) subsystem.[370]
2.4.21: RHEL 3.x

Old version, no longer maintained: 2.2 26 January 1999[371] 2.2.26[372] Marc-Christian Petersen (formerly Alan Cox) Made unofficially obsolete with the 2.2.27-rc2[373][374][375]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.0 9 June 1996[376] 2.0.40[377] David Weinehall officially made obsolete with the kernel 2.2.0 release[378] Larry Ewing created the Tux mascot in 1996
Old version, no longer maintained: pre2.0 12 May 1996 pre2.0.14 Linus Torvalds EOL
Old version, no longer maintained: 1.3 12 June 1995 1.3.100[379] Greased Weasel[380]
Old version, no longer maintained: 1.2 7 March 1995 1.2.13 Linux '95[381]
Old version, no longer maintained: 1.1 6 April 1994 1.1.95
Old version, no longer maintained: 1.0 14 March 1994 1.0.9
Old version, no longer maintained: 0.99 13 December 1992 0.99.15j[382] The Linux 0.99 tar.bz2 archive grew from 426 kB to 1009 kB on the way to 1.0.
Old version, no longer maintained: 0.98 29 September 1992 0.98.6[383]
Old version, no longer maintained: 0.97 1 August 1992 0.97.6[384]
Old version, no longer maintained: 0.96 22 May 1992 0.96c.2[385]
Old version, no longer maintained: 0.95 8 March 1992 0.95c+[386]
Old version, no longer maintained: 0.10 November 1991 0.12
Old version, no longer maintained: 0.02 5 October 1991 First "usable" release; for wider distribution[387]
Old version, no longer maintained: 0.01 17 September 1991 0.03
Legend:
Old version
Older version, still maintained
Latest version
Latest preview version
Future release

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]