List of burials at Arlington National Cemetery

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This is a list of notable individuals buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Military[edit]

Medal of Honor recipients[edit]

As of May 2006, there were 367 Medal of Honor recipients buried in Arlington National Cemetery,[1] nine of whom are Canadians.

Alan Louis Eggers, Medal of Honor recipient for World War I.

A[edit]

B[edit]

C[edit]

D[edit]

  • William Joseph "Wild Bill" Donovan (1883–1959), US Army major general. Commanded the 165th Infantry Regiment (federalized designation of the 69th New York Infantry, the "Fighting Irish") during World War I, and was Chief of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) during World War II. Also awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, Distinguished Service Medal, and National Security Medal, only person to hold all four of the United States' highest awards

E[edit]

F[edit]

G[edit]

  • James A. Graham (1940–1967, US Marine officer, received for his actions during the Vietnam War.

H[edit]

I[edit]

J[edit]

K[edit]

L[edit]

M[edit]

N[edit]

O[edit]

P[edit]

Q[edit]

R[edit]

S[edit]

T[edit]

U[edit]

  • Frank Monroe Upton (1896–1962) US Navy sailor, for action during World War I
  • Matt Urban (1919–1995), Lt. Colonel, U.S Army. Also received seven Purple Hearts, World War II. He has the most individual combat decorations for an infantryman (~14) from US Army for World War II.

V[edit]

W[edit]

Y[edit]

Z[edit]

  • Jay Zeamer, Jr. (1918–2007), Lt. Colonel, US Air Force, for action during World War II with the Army Air Force

Flag officers[edit]

A[edit]

B[edit]

C[edit]

D[edit]

E[edit]

F[edit]

Charles D. Griffin, Navy four-star admiral.

G[edit]

H[edit]

I[edit]

J[edit]

K[edit]

L[edit]

  • Rae Landy (1885–1952) Army Nurse Corps lieutenant colonel who served in World War I and World War II
  • Henry Louis Larsen (1890–1962), Marine lieutenant general; commanded the first deployed American troops in both World Wars; Governor of Guam and American Samoa
  • John Marshall Lee (1914–2003), vice admiral, US Navy; World War II, Korea, Vietnam, NATO, S.A.L.T Talks; Navy Cross, DSM, Legion of Merit; son of Lieutenant-Colonel Alva Lee

M[edit]

N[edit]

O[edit]

Pershing's tombstone at Arlington National Cemetery

P[edit]

R[edit]

S[edit]

T[edit]

V[edit]

  • Howard L. Vickery (1892–1946), vice-admiral, US Navy and World War II merchant shipbuilder

W[edit]

Other military burials[edit]

A[edit]

B[edit]

C[edit]

D[edit]

E[edit]

G[edit]

H[edit]

J[edit]

  • James Jabara (1923–1966), first American jet ace in history, credited with shooting down 15 enemy aircraft
  • George Juskalian (1914–2010), US Army veteran, three decades and fought in three wars – World War II, Korean War, and Vietnam War

K[edit]

L[edit]

  • Ruth A. Lucas (1920–2013), the first African American female Air Force Colonel
  • Francis Lupo (1895–1918), private killed in France during World War I; holds the distinction of possibly being the longest US service member missing in action to be found (1918–2003)

M[edit]

O[edit]

P[edit]

S[edit]

T[edit]

  • Larry Thorne (born as Lauri Törni, 1919–1965), Finnish soldier who served in the US special forces and was a World War II veteran; called "soldier who fought under three flags" (Finland, Germany, and US)

Y[edit]

Other notable military service members[edit]

A[edit]

B[edit]

C[edit]

D[edit]

E[edit]

Medgar Evers, civil rights activist.

F[edit]

G[edit]

H[edit]

I[edit]

J[edit]

K[edit]

Edward M. Kennedy, US Senator.

L[edit]

M[edit]

P[edit]

Q[edit]

R[edit]

S[edit]

T[edit]

  • William Howard Taft, Secretary of War, President of the United States, Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court
  • John Tyler Jr. (1819–1896), son of President John Tyler,[19] served as Private Secretary to his father, Confederate Assistant Secretary of War

W[edit]

John W. Weeks, Secretary of War

Y[edit]

Notable civilians[edit]

B[edit]

C[edit]

D[edit]

G[edit]

H[edit]

K[edit]

M[edit]

O[edit]

P[edit]

  • James Parks, freedman, the only person buried at Arlington Cemetery who was born on the grounds.
Front face of the Space Shuttle Challenger Memorial in Arlington National Cemetery

R[edit]

T[edit]

Other[edit]

Remains of the Space Shuttle Challenger's crew are interred in Section 46, including four civilians and three military members. Challenger Astronaut Judith Resnik is memorialized with a cenotaph.

Four state funerals have been held at Arlington: those of Presidents William Howard Taft and John F. Kennedy, that of General John J. Pershing, and that of US Senator from Massachusetts Edward M. Kennedy.

References and notes[edit]

  1. ^ Medal of Honor Recipients Buried at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved on April 9, 2006.
  2. ^ Sec. 64, grave 6992, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA., Wilson, Scott. Resting Places: The Burial Sites of More Than 14,000 Famous Persons, 3d ed.: 2 (Kindle Locations 247-248). McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers. Kindle Edition.
  3. ^ Los Angeles Times
  4. ^ Michael Robert Patterson, ed. (May 13, 2009). "David E. Baker: Brigadier General, United States Air Force". Arlington National Cemetery Website. Retrieved March 16, 2011. 
  5. ^ Arlingtoncemetery.net
  6. ^ CWGC: John Dill
  7. ^ John Spencer Hardy obituary, Baton Rouge Morning Advocate, May 3, 2012
  8. ^ http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/washingtonpost/obituary.aspx?n=jeanne-m-holm&pid=139892802
  9. ^ TogetherWeServed – VADM Benedict Semmes
  10. ^ Paul Duggan (March 15, 2011). "Frank Buckles, last US veteran of World War I, laid to rest at Arlington". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 16, 2011. 
  11. ^ 1917–1918, Who's Who and Why in Canada, Vol. 13, p. 1139
  12. ^ http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/twcrawford.htm
  13. ^ "Former AP executive Koehler, who also served a week in Reagan White House, dies in Conn. at 82". Associated Press. Minneapolis Star Tribune. 2012-09-29. Retrieved 2012-10-08. 
  14. ^ http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/acmaxwell.htm
  15. ^ "Arlington Cemetery Listing
  16. ^ New York Times Obituary, March 6, 1935; and www.arlingtoncemetery.net/owholmes.htm
  17. ^ "Headstone A K Lowenstein". Arlington National Cemetery Website. 
  18. ^ Spann had served in the USMC, but was not in the military when killed. Because he had received the CIA's Intelligence Star, considered the equivalent of the US Military's Silver Star, his burial in Arlington was authorized. See: Bush At War, Bob Woodward, Simon and Schuester, 2002, p. 317
  19. ^ http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/john-tyler-jr.htm Arlingtoncemetery.net
  20. ^ Rapp, David (2013-10-21). "Roll Call Founder Sid Yudain Dies at 90". Roll Call. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  21. ^ New York Times

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 38°52′37″N 77°04′23″W / 38.877°N 77.073°W / 38.877; -77.073