Petter Northug

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Petter Northug
Petter Northug - Ski WM 2011.jpg
Petter Northug during the FIS Nordic Skiing World Championships in Oslo, Norway in February 2011
Country Norway
Full namePetter Northug Jr.
Born (1986-01-06) 6 January 1986 (age 35)
Framverran, Mosvik, Norway
Height1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Ski clubStrindheim IL
World Cup career
Seasons20052018
Individual wins38
Team wins9
Indiv. podiums84
Team podiums12
Indiv. starts219
Team starts16
Overall titles2 – (2010, 2013)
Discipline titles1 – (1 DI: 2010)
Medal record
Representing  Norway
Event 1st 2nd 3rd
Olympic Games 2 1 1
World Championships 13 3 0
Total 15 4 1
Men's cross-country skier
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 2010 Vancouver 50 km classical
Gold medal – first place 2010 Vancouver Team sprint
Silver medal – second place 2010 Vancouver 4 × 10 km relay
Bronze medal – third place 2010 Vancouver Individual sprint
World Championships
Gold medal – first place 2007 Sapporo 4 × 10 km relay
Gold medal – first place 2009 Liberec 30 km skiathlon
Gold medal – first place 2009 Liberec 50 km freestyle
Gold medal – first place 2009 Liberec 4 × 10 km relay
Gold medal – first place 2011 Oslo 30 km skiathlon
Gold medal – first place 2011 Oslo 50 km freestyle
Gold medal – first place 2011 Oslo 4 × 10 km relay
Gold medal – first place 2013 Val di Fiemme 15 km freestyle
Gold medal – first place 2013 Val di Fiemme 4 × 10 km relay
Gold medal – first place 2015 Falun Individual sprint
Gold medal – first place 2015 Falun 50 km classical
Gold medal – first place 2015 Falun Team sprint
Gold medal – first place 2015 Falun 4 × 10 km relay
Silver medal – second place 2011 Oslo Individual sprint
Silver medal – second place 2011 Oslo Team sprint
Silver medal – second place 2013 Val di Fiemme Individual sprint
Junior World Championships
Gold medal – first place 2005 Rovaniemi 20 km skiathlon
Gold medal – first place 2005 Rovaniemi 10 km freestyle
Gold medal – first place 2006 Kranj Individual sprint
Gold medal – first place 2006 Kranj 10 km classical
Gold medal – first place 2006 Kranj 20 km skiathlon
Gold medal – first place 2006 Kranj 4 × 5 km relay
Silver medal – second place 2005 Rovaniemi Individual sprint
Silver medal – second place 2005 Rovaniemi 4 × 10 km relay

Petter Northug Jr. (born 6 January 1986) is a Norwegian former cross-country skier and double Olympic champion. He won a total of 13 World Championship and 2 Winter Olympic gold medals with 20 medals overall (2 gold, 1 silver and 1 bronze at the Olympics, 13 gold and 3 silver at the World Ski Championships), and 18 individual FIS Cross-Country World Cup wins with 13 podium places. He is also the record holder for most stage wins (13) in Tour de Ski. By winning his ninth gold medal in the Nordic World Ski Championships in 4 × 10 km relay in Val di Fiemme 2013 he leveled[citation needed] the achievement of Bjørn Dæhlie who had been the most successful World Champion male skier up to that point.

He is expected to work as a commentator of skiing, on channel TV 2 during the winter of 2021/2022.[1]

Early life and career[edit]

During his early years, Northug was generally considered a star of the future. Whilst he was still a junior Verdens Gang newspaper reported in November 2005 that "the ski manufacturers are fighting to get Northug".[2] Fischer won his signature, and his contract included a base salary (the first time ever for a junior), which would be multiplied by five if he made the Norwegian elite team for 2006/07, a goal in which he was successful. The contract also offered bonuses if he won medals in the junior World Championships.

Northug has six gold medals from junior World Championships. His first two gold medals came in 2004/05 in the pursuit and the 10 km freestyle in Rovaniemi, then in 2005/06 in Kranj he won gold in the 10 km classic, the pursuit, the sprint, and the relay. He also has two silver medals (one in the sprint, and one in the relay, both in 2004/05). His victories made him the first athlete ever to win five individual gold medals at the FIS Junior Nordic World Ski Championships. During 2005/06 he also took part in the Norwegian National Championships, and won the double pursuit race, beating Frode Estil by 1.9 seconds, and became the first junior to ever win a Norwegian National Championship.

Before he joined the World Cup he competed in a few Continental Cup meetings, but mostly in the Scandinavian Cup. During his Scandinavian Cup career (2004/05 & 2005/06) he had seven podium finishes, he came second once in 2004/05, and in 2005/06 he scored four victories, and two second places.

Skiing career[edit]

The 2005—006 season was Northug's first in the World Cup, although he competed in one race the season before, a sprint in Drammen, he came 35th. During the 2005/06 season he shared his time equally between the World Cup and the Scandinavian Cup, although in early May 2006 it was announced that Northug would be in the senior national team for the 2006/07 season.[3] Northug also claimed his first World Cup victory in the 2005/06 season, in a pursuit race in Falun, beating 2005/06 World Cup winner Tobias Angerer, who came second, and 2004/05 overall champion Axel Teichmann was third.[4] Then in the last race of the year, a pursuit in Sapporo he claimed another podium place, coming second.[5] He lost to Mathias Fredriksson by 3.8 seconds. He also came seventh, tenth, and twelfth in sprint races, and fifteenth in the 50 km freestyle in Holmenkollen. Northug finished the 2005/06 World Cup season in 14th place overall. He also finished 14th in the distance standings, and 24th in the sprint.[6]

After Norway's disappointing display at the 2006 Winter Olympics, the Norwegian press questioned why Northug was not taken to the Games. Northug himself admitted he was disappointed after not getting selected, especially as he had won the double pursuit in the National Championships earlier in the year.[7] The day after the 2006 Olympics Team was announced, Northug was on the team winning the Norwegian Championships in 4x10 kilometer relay. As he crossed the finish line, he shouted "And I am not going to the Olympics?".[8]

Northug won his first gold medal at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships in Sapporo as a member of the 4 x 10 km relay in 2007. Northug completed the last leg of the relay, beating Sweden and Russia on the sprint for the finish line. He was also in a good position to compete for the silver in the 30 kilometer duathlon, but he fell in the last part of the race and was disappointed to finish fifth.

He was far more successful at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2009 in Liberec, where he earned three golds in the 15 km + 15 km double pursuit, 4 x 10 km relay and 50 km freestyle mass start. In all three events he sprinted away from the rest of the pack to win the race.[9]

Northug was the runner up to the overall World Cup in the 2008/2009 season, losing to the Swiss Dario Cologna after leading before the final races.

Northug finished in an extremely disappointing 41st place in the first Cross Country event during the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. A day later, Northug responded with a bronze medal in the Sprint Event. This success was short-lived however, as he broke his pole in the end of the 30 km pursuit, where he was one of the biggest favourites to win.[10] He then won his first Olympic gold, in the Team Sprint, alongside Øystein Pettersen.

Days later he was skiing the anchor leg in the 4 x 10 km relay. When he took over from Lars Berger who was skiing the 3rd leg, he was 37.5 seconds behind the lead group. Despite this he managed to catch and overtake France and the Czech Republic to win Norway a silver medal. Northug then won his first individual medal at the Olympics when he won gold at the Men's 50 kilometre classic. Less than two weeks later, he won the 50 kilometre freestyle event at the Holmenkollen, becoming the first skier to win the 50 km at the Winter Olympics, World Championships, and Holmenkollen since Sweden's Gunde Svan reached that triple crown in 1988.

In September 2010 details of Northug's sponsorship contract with soft drink manufacturer Red Bull were publicized by Norwegian broadcaster TV 2, which did not divulge its sources, revealing the most profitable sponsorship agreement with an individual athlete in Norwegian history. For four years, until after the 2014 Winter Olympics, Northug was slated to receive a minimum of NOK 1 million annually with a prospect of getting twice that amount if his performances equalled those of his recent previous seasons.[11]

Northug did not start the 2010–2011 season well, missing the first three weeks of the World Cup due to illness. His Tour de Ski campaign was also marred by relatively poor results in the opening stages. However, he climbed the rankings and finished 2nd after winning the prestigious penultimate stage (20 km classic mass start) in Val di Fiemme. In doing so, he also took all the intermediate bonus sprints, which had never previously been done by the winner of the race. In the Holmenkollen World Ski Championship Northug raced in five disciplines, taking 3 gold and 2 silver medals. During the 2011 World Championship, he gained widespread international attention when he controversially crossed the finish-line sideways after decisively beating his opponents on the last leg of the 4x10 kilometre relay. The gesture was regarded by media as disrespectful, most notably towards his most fierce rival, Marcus Hellner. At the end of the season Northug also won the Season Finale in Sweden, beating his compatriot Finn Haagen Krogh.

In the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2013, Northug won the 15 km freestyle for the first time at a World Championships, completing his collection of World Championship gold medals. He again beat the Swedes on the sprint of the 4x10 km relay, securing Norway's 7th World Championship gold medal in a row in the relay. Northug also won a silver in the individual sprint. He was less successful on the team sprint, where he and his teammate, Pål Golberg, went out in the semifinal. Despite being a favorite before the 50 km, Northug finished 21st. He gave the winner, Johan Olsson, his jersey after the race as a gesture of respect.

Northug had an impressive ending to the 2012–13 season. He won the 15 km individual classic in Lahti by over half a minute before being victorious in the famous classic sprint in Drammen. In the Season Finale in Sweden, Northug won first two stages, the prestigious classic sprint in Stockholm and freestyle prologue in Falun, then finished fourth in the penultimate stage, 15k classic mass start, and closed the season by winning the whole mini-tour. Before Lahti, Northug was in the third place in the World Cup, 226 points behind the lead; by the time it finished, he stood in first, 180 points ahead of second place.

The 2013-14 season saw Northug struggle with an illness which severely impacted his performance. Particularly frustrating for him was his inability to fight for medals in the skiathlon and individual sprint of the Sochi Olympics. His relatively lackluster performance in the 50 km event, which saw him finish a distant 18th in a race he had definitively won four years earlier, meant he left a major world event without a single medal for the first time in eight years.

Northug looked to be in better physical shape in the 2014/2015 season, and proved to be Sundby's strongest competition during that season's Tour de Ski. Despite leading before the final climb up the Alpe Cermis, he lost to Sundby, who won his second TdS title in a row. In July 2016, Sundby lost that title to Northug after Sundby's anti-doping rule violation, thereby giving Northug his first Tour de Ski win.[12]

At the 2015 World Championships in Falun, Northug secured his 10th WC gold medal by narrowly beating Canada's Alex Harvey in a bunch sprint to the finish line in the men's classic sprint event. He then proceeded to contribute to Norway's victory in both the team sprint and 4x10km relay. The final race of these World Championships, i.e. the 50 km classic, saw Northug notch a notable victory. The race was held in difficult conditions due to heavy snowfall; sitting at third in the last climb before the finish, Northug, in a remarkable display of double poling, managed to overtake his remaining two opponents to win the race. As of 2015, Northug had won 20 Olympic and World Championship medals (15 gold, 4 silver, 1 bronze).

He announced his retirement from cross-country skiing on 12 December 2018.[13]

Career after competitive skiing[edit]

As late as 13 August 2020 he was doing occasional work as a celebrity at summer camp for teenage skiers.

In August 2020 Uno-X said that their sponsorship deal with Northug would be canceled in the near future, due to [the company's view that] Northug "must concentrate about other things".[14]

In November 2020 he released a Christmas song, "Petters Jul".[15]

Personal life[edit]

He has two brothers, Even and Tomas.[16] Tomas Northug also skis professionally and won the Junior World Championships in sprint in 2010.[17] Northug finished school in 2006, but during the summer of 2005 he changed schools from Steinkjer to Meråker and moved into a cabin next to the ski trails to optimize his training conditions.[18]

Northug is an active poker player, and has openly supported the legalization of poker in Norway, which is currently illegal when prizes are involved under Norwegian gambling laws. He participated and cashed (on 653rd place) in the 2010 World Series of Poker main event which he played with skiing rival Marcus Hellner.[19]

Northug is featured in the music video "Rise Again" by Jack Taylor, featuring Mo of Norway.[20]

Substance abuse and traffic violations[edit]

In the early hours of 4 May 2014, Northug crashed his car, an Audi A7, near his home in Byåsen, Trondheim, while driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol.[21] At the time, it was suspected that the car was driving well over the speed limit, which was 40 km/h (25 mph) at the site of the crash. A 23-year-old male passenger broke his collar bone in the crash. After the crash, Northug fled the scene, but was located at his nearby residence by the police using search dogs. In a press release made later the day of the crash, Northug apologised for the incident.[22]

On 15 September 2014, Northug was charged by the Norwegian public prosecutor with five counts of violation of the Norwegian Road Traffic Act and one count of violation of the general civil penal code. The latter charge stemmed from Northug having claimed, in three separate police interrogations on the day of the crash, that his passenger had actually been driving the vehicle at the time of the accident. Due to Northug's initial claims, the passenger had been preliminarily charged with causing the incident.[23]

Because Northug pleaded guilty to all the charges leveled against him, he received a summary trial, which took place on 9 October 2014 at the Sør-Trøndelag District Court in Trondheim. Northug was sentenced to 50 days of prison, ten days less than requested by the prosecutor. He had already served two days of the sentence in police custody after his initial arrest. In addition to the prison time, Northug was fined 185,000 kr and lost his driver's license [indefinitely, or at least] for five years.[24][25] The prison sentence was served, while wearing an ankle monitor, in his home.[26]

As a result of the crash, Audi decided not to renew their sponsorship agreement with Northug. Audi had been a sponsor of Northug since June 2011.[27]

2020[edit]

On 13 August 2020, in Ullensaker, Northug was caught going 168 km/h (104 mph) on a 110 km/h (68 mph) road in his Jaguar F-Type SVR. Police did not confiscate the 40,000 Norwegian kroner found in Northug's car, however police proceeded to search his home and found around 10 grams of substance containing cocaine.[28][29][30]

A later indictment in 2020 charged him with reckless driving at high speed, illegal possession (in his home) of 6 grams cocaine, 0.6 grams of MDMA, three tablets containing Diazepam and two tablets containing Alprazolam; and [holding or] using a mobile phone while driving.[31][32] He pleaded guilty (before trial) on all counts; in a summary trial on 21 December 2020 he testified via videolink,[33] at Oslo District Court, he was sentenced to 7 months in prison and his driving license was revoked [indefinitely, or] at least for 5 years.[34][35] The proceedings in court, revealed that Northug had been driving over 200 km/h on several occasions—two of them in an 80 km/h zone.[36] The verdict said that while he was speeding, he made 4 video recordings—over several days—[37] for a total of 12 minutes, while commenting[38] about his own driving, as if the drivers being passed were being humiliated and put in their place."[39]

As of June 2021, he was enrolled [as a client] at a clinic that deals with drug dependency; there he was serving his seven-month prison sentence, according to media.[40][41][42] During the summer of 2021, he was released.[42]

Cross-country skiing results[edit]

All results are sourced from the International Ski Federation (FIS).[43]

Olympic Games[edit]

  • 4 medals – (2 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze)
 Year   Age   15 km   30 km   50 km   Sprint  4 × 10 km 
 relay 
 Team Sprint
2010 24 41 11 Gold Bronze Silver Gold
2014 28 16 18 10 4

World Championships[edit]

  • 16 medals – (13 gold, 3 silver)
 Year   Age   15 km   30 km   50 km   Sprint  4 × 10 km 
 relay 
 Team Sprint
2007 21 24 5 Gold 7
2009 23 29 Gold Gold Gold
2011 25 Gold Gold Silver Gold Silver
2013 27 Gold 4 21 Silver Gold 11
2015 29 62 11 Gold Gold Gold Gold
2017 31 8 5

World Cup[edit]

Season titles[edit]

  • 3 titles – (2 overall, 1 distance)
 Season   Discipline 
2010 Overall
Distance
2013 Overall
 Season   Age  Discipline standings Ski Tour standings
Overall Distance Sprint Nordic
Opening
Tour de
Ski
World Cup
Final
Ski Tour
Canada
2005 19 NC NC N/A N/A N/A N/A
2006 20 14 14 24 N/A N/A N/A N/A
2007 21 7 24 18 N/A 4 N/A N/A
2008 22 12 24 14 N/A 8 6 N/A
2009 23 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 5 N/A 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 4 N/A
2010 24 1st place, gold medalist(s) 1st place, gold medalist(s) 2nd place, silver medalist(s) N/A 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 1st place, gold medalist(s) N/A
2011 25 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 4 7 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 1st place, gold medalist(s) N/A
2012 26 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 5 21 1st place, gold medalist(s) 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) N/A
2013 27 1st place, gold medalist(s) 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 1st place, gold medalist(s) 4 1st place, gold medalist(s) N/A
2014 28 6 9 25 13 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) N/A
2015 29 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 5 8 15 1st place, gold medalist(s) N/A N/A
2016 30 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 8 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 4 N/A 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
2017 31 65 118 27 DNF N/A
2018 32 NC NC N/A

Individual podiums[edit]

  • 38 victories (20 WC, 18 SWC)
  • 84 podiums (40 WC, 44 SWC)
No. Season Date Location Race Level Place
1 2005–06 8 March 2006 Sweden Falun, Sweden 10 km + 10 km Pursuit C/F World Cup 1st
2 19 March 2006 Japan Sapporo, Japan 15 km + 15 km Pursuit C/F World Cup 2nd
3 2006–07 5 January 2007 Italy Asiago, Italy 1.2 km Sprint F Stage World Cup 3rd
4 10 March 2007 Finland Lahti, Finland 1.4 km Sprint F World Cup 1st
5 2007–08 4 January 2008 Italy Asiago, Italy 1.2 km Sprint F Stage World Cup 1st
6 2008–09 22 November 2008 Sweden Gällivare, Sweden 15 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
7 6 December 2008 France La Clusaz, France 30 km Mass Start F World Cup 1st
8 27 December 2008 Germany Oberhof, Germany 3.75 km Individual F Stage World Cup 3rd
9 1 January 2009 Czech Republic Nové Město, Czech Republic 1.2 km Sprint F Stage World Cup 1st
10 27 December 2008 –
4 January 2009
GermanyCzech RepublicItaly Tour de Ski Overall Standings World Cup 2nd
11 7 March 2009 Finland Lahti, Finland 1.55 km Sprint F World Cup 1st
12 12 March 2009 Norway Trondheim, Norway 1.6 km Sprint C World Cup 2nd
13 2009–10 12 March 2009 Switzerland Davos, Switzerland 1.7 km Sprint F World Cup 2nd
14 29 November 2009 Finland Rukatunturi, Finland 15 km Individual C World Cup 1st
15 19 December 2009 Slovenia Rogla, Slovenia 1.5 km Sprint C World Cup 1st
16 20 December 2009 Slovenia Rogla, Slovenia 30 km Mass Start C World Cup 1st
17 1 January 2010 Germany Oberhof, Germany 3.75 km Individual F Stage World Cup 1st
18 2 January 2010 Germany Oberhof, Germany 15 km Pursuit C Stage World Cup 1st
19 3 January 2010 Germany Oberhof, Germany 1.6 km Sprint C Stage World Cup 2nd
20 6 January 2010 Italy Cortina-Toblach, Italy 35 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 1st
21 7 January 2010 Italy Toblach, Italy 10 km Individual C Stage World Cup 3rd
22 9 January 2010 Italy Val di Fiemme, Italy 20 km Mass Start C Stage World Cup 2nd
23 1–10 January 2010 GermanyCzech RepublicItaly Tour de Ski Overall Standings World Cup 2nd
24 11 March 2010 Norway Drammen, Norway 1.2 km Sprint C World Cup 2nd
25 13 March 2010 Norway Oslo, Norway 50 km Mass Start F World Cup 1st
26 17 March 2010 Sweden Stockholm, Sweden 1.0 km Sprint C Stage World Cup 2nd
27 20 March 2010 Sweden Falun, Sweden 10 km + 10 km Pursuit C/F Stage World Cup 1st
28 17–21 March 2010 Sweden World Cup Final Overall Standings World Cup 1st
29 2010–11 18 December 2010 France La Clusaz, France 30 km Mass Start F World Cup 2nd
30 31 December 2010 Germany Oberhof, Germany 3.75 km Individual F Stage World Cup 3rd
31 5 January 2011 Italy Toblach, Italy 1.3 km Sprint F Stage World Cup 3rd
32 5 January 2011 Italy Cortina-Toblach, Italy 35 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 3rd
33 8 January 2011 Italy Val di Fiemme, Italy 20 km Mass Start C Stage World Cup 1st
34 31 December 2010 –
9 January 2011
GermanyItaly Tour de Ski Overall Standings World Cup 2nd
35 19 February 2011 Norway Drammen, Norway 15 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
36 20 February 2011 Norway Drammen, Norway 1.6 km Sprint F World Cup 3rd
37 16 March 2011 Sweden Stockholm, Sweden 1.0 km Sprint C Stage World Cup 2nd
38 18 March 2011 Sweden Falun, Sweden 3.3 km Individual C Stage World Cup 2nd
39 19 March 2011 Sweden Falun, Sweden 10 km + 10 km Pursuit C/F Stage World Cup 1st
40 16–20 March 2011 Sweden World Cup Final Overall Standings World Cup 1st
41 2011–12 19 November 2011 Norway Sjusjøen, Norway 15 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
42 26 November 2011 Finland Rukatunturi, Finland 10 km Individual F Stage World Cup 1st
43 25–27 November 2011 Finland Nordic Opening Overall Standings World Cup 1st
44 10 December 2011 Switzerland Davos, Switzerland 30 km Individual F World Cup 1st
45 17 December 2011 Slovenia Rogla, Slovenia 15 km Mass Start C World Cup 1st
46 29 December 2011 Germany Oberhof, Germany 3.75 km Individual F Stage World Cup 1st
47 30 December 2011 Germany Oberhof, Germany 15 km Pursuit C Stage World Cup 2nd
48 1 January 2012 Germany Oberhof, Germany 10 km + 10 km Skiathlon C/F Stage World Cup 1st
49 4 January 2012 Italy Toblach, Italy 1.3 km Sprint F Stage World Cup 2nd
50 5 January 2012 Italy Toblach, Italy 35 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 2nd
51 29 December 2011 –
8 January 2012
GermanyItaly Tour de Ski Overall Standings World Cup 3rd
52 2012–13 30 November 2012 Finland Rukatunturi, Finland 1.4 km Sprint C Stage World Cup 2nd
53 1 December 2012 Finland Rukatunturi, Finland 10 km Individual F Stage World Cup 2nd
54 30 November –
2 December 2012
Finland Nordic Opening Overall Standings World Cup 1st
55 29 December 2012 Germany Oberhof, Germany 4 km Individual F Stage World Cup 1st
56 30 December 2012 Germany Oberhof, Germany 15 km Pursuit C Stage World Cup 3rd
57 3 January 2013 Italy Cortina-Toblach, Italy 35 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 1st
58 3 January 2013 Italy Toblach, Italy 5 km Individual C Stage World Cup 2nd
59 1 February 2013 Russia Sochi, Russia 1.8 km Sprint F World Cup 1st
60 10 March 2013 Finland Lahti, Finland 15 km Individual C World Cup 1st
61 13 March 2013 Norway Drammen, Norway 1.3 km Sprint C World Cup 1st
62 20 March 2013 Sweden Stockholm, Sweden 1.1 km Sprint C Stage World Cup 1st
63 22 March 2013 Sweden Falun, Sweden 3.75 km Individual F Stage World Cup 1st
64 20–24 March 2013 Sweden World Cup Final Overall Standings World Cup 1st
65 2013–14 3 January 2014 Italy Cortina-Toblach, Italy 35 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 2nd
66 4 January 2014 Italy Val di Fiemme, Italy 10 km Individual C Stage World Cup 1st
67 28 December 2013 –
5 January 2014
GermanySwitzerlandItaly Tour de Ski Overall Standings World Cup 3rd
68 2014–15 29 November 2014 Finland Rukatunturi, Finland 1.4 km Sprint C World Cup 2nd
69 24 December 2014 Switzerland Davos, Switzerland 15 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
70 3 January 2015 Germany Oberstdorf, Germany 4 km Individual F Stage World Cup 3rd
71 4 January 2015 Germany Oberstdorf, Germany 15 km Pursuit C Stage World Cup 1st
72 6 January 2015 Switzerland Val Müstair, Switzerland 1.4 km Sprint F Stage World Cup 2nd
73 8 January 2015 Italy Toblach, Italy 25 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 1st
74 3–11 January 2015 GermanySwitzerlandItaly Tour de Ski Overall Standings World Cup 1st
75 2015–16 27 November 2015 Finland Rukatunturi, Finland 1.4 km Sprint C Stage World Cup 3rd
76 27–29 November 2015 Finland Nordic Opening Overall Standings World Cup 2nd
77 2 January 2016 Switzerland Lenzerheide, Switzerland 30 km Mass Start C Stage World Cup 2nd
78 3 January 2016 Switzerland Lenzerheide, Switzerland 10 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 2nd
79 3 February 2016 Norway Drammen, Norway 1.2 km Sprint C World Cup 1st
80 11 February 2016 Sweden Stockholm, Sweden 1.2 km Sprint C World Cup 3rd
81 20 February 2016 Finland Lahti, Finland 1.6 km Sprint F World Cup 3rd
82 2 March 2016 Canada Montreal, Canada 17.5 km Mass Start F Stage World Cup 2nd
83 5 March 2016 Canada Quebec City, Canada 15 km Pursuit Stage World Cup 2nd
84 1–12 March 2016 Canada Ski Tour Canada Overall Standings World Cup 3rd

Team podiums[edit]

  • 9 victories – (9 RL)
  • 12 podiums – (12 RL)
No. Season Date Location Race Level Place Teammates
1 2006–07 17 December 2006 France La Clusaz, France 4 × 10 km Relay C/F World Cup 2nd Bjørndalen / Hetland / Rønning
2 25 March 2007 Sweden Falun, Sweden 4 × 10 km Relay C/F World Cup 1st Pettersen Hjelmeset / Estil
3 2007–08 24 February 2008 Sweden Falun, Sweden 4 × 10 km Relay C/F World Cup 1st Sundby / Jespersen / Eilifsen
4 2008–09 23 November 2008 Sweden Gällivare, Sweden 4 × 10 km Relay C/F World Cup 1st Sundby / Rønning / Hofstad
5 7 December 2008 France La Clusaz, France 4 × 10 km Relay C/F World Cup 1st Hetland / Sundby / Gjerdalen
6 2009–10 22 November 2009 Norway Beitostølen, Norway 4 × 10 km Relay C/F World Cup 1st Rønning / Sundby / Hafsås
7 2010–11 19 December 2010 France La Clusaz, France 4 × 10 km Relay C/F World Cup 3rd Rønning / Sundby / Gjerdalen
8 2011–12 22 November 2011 Norway Sjusjøen, Norway 4 × 10 km Relay C/F World Cup 1st Rønning / Krogh / Berger
9 12 January 2012 Czech Republic Nové Město, Czech Republic 4 × 10 km Relay C/F World Cup 1st Rønning / Dyrhaug / Sundby
10 2012–13 25 November 2012 Sweden Gällivare, Sweden 4 × 7.5 km Relay C/F World Cup 1st Rønning / Sundby / Røthe
11 2013–14 8 December 2013 Norway Lillehammer, Norway 4 × 7.5 km Relay C/F World Cup 3rd Golberg / Tønseth / Sundby
12 2015–16 6 December 2015 Sweden Gällivare, Sweden 4 × 7.5 km Relay C/F World Cup 1st Dyrhaug / Holund / Sundby

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.dagbladet.no/sport/tv-2-bekrefter-tilbake-som-ekspert/74265741
  2. ^ "Skifabrikkene sloss om Northug" [Ski manufacturers fighting to acquire Northug]. Vg.no. 2005-01-01. Retrieved 2011-08-07.
  3. ^ "— Norwegian National team Selection For 2006-2007". Fasterskier.com. 2006-05-10. Retrieved 2015-03-27.
  4. ^ "resultats". FIS-Ski. Retrieved 2011-08-07.[permanent dead link]
  5. ^ "resultats". FIS-Ski. 2006-03-19. Retrieved 2011-08-07.[permanent dead link]
  6. ^ "standings". FIS-Ski. Retrieved 2011-08-07.[permanent dead link]
  7. ^ [1] Archived September 27, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  8. ^ "Gullkorn fra barneskirenn - Langrenn". Dagbladet.no. 2008-11-24. Archived from the original on 2015-02-26. Retrieved 2015-03-27.
  9. ^ "Northug wins 50-kilometer freestyle". The New York Times. Retrieved 2015-03-27.
  10. ^ T (2011-10-12). "Northug knust etter stavbrekk - Aftenposten". Aftenposten.no. Archived from the original on 2014-03-20. Retrieved 2015-03-27.
  11. ^ "Så mye tjener Northug på sin Red Bull-avtale" (in Norwegian). TV 2. September 24, 2010. Retrieved September 24, 2010.
  12. ^ "Northug tildelt seier i Tour de ski". 20 July 2016.
  13. ^ "2-time Olympic champion Northug to retire from his sport". Fox Sports. 12 December 2018. Retrieved 12 December 2018.
  14. ^ https://kampanje.com/markedsforing/2020/08/norsk-profflag-avslutter-samarbeidet-med-northug/ "- Vi inngikk en avtale med Northug og så frem til det samarbeidet, og nå innser vi at nok Petter må konsentrere seg om andre ting. Avtalen vil innen kort tid bli avsluttet. [...] Det norske profflaget signerte en utstyrsavtale med Northug i fjor høst, og har syklet med langrennsprofilens briller siden."
  15. ^ "Northug med julelåt: – Har itj vært snill gutt i år".
  16. ^ "Petter Northug Jr". Teamnorthug.no. Retrieved 2011-08-07.
  17. ^ "Northug juniorverdensmester - NRK – Trøndelag". Nrk.no. 2010-01-25. Retrieved 2015-03-27.
  18. ^ [2] Archived September 27, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  19. ^ "— Northug, Hellner Survive First Day of Poker World Series". Fasterskier.com. 2010-07-05. Retrieved 2015-03-27.
  20. ^ "Rise Again".
  21. ^ Northug: – Jeg var sjåfør av ulykkesbilen (in Norwegian) NRK. Retrieved 4 May 2014
  22. ^ "Northug innrømmer at han kjørte ulykkesbilen og at han hadde promille". TV2.no. 2014-10-13. Retrieved 2015-03-27.
  23. ^ Murtnes, Sindre (16 September 2014). "Se hele tiltalen mot Northug". NRK (in Norwegian). Retrieved 18 September 2014.
  24. ^ Nilsen, Amund Aune (1 October 2014). "Ikke redd for kaos under Northug-rettssaken". NRK (in Norwegian). Retrieved 3 October 2014.
  25. ^ Sandberg, Fredrik Økstad (9 October 2014). "Dommen er klar: Northug fikk 50 dagers fengsel". Dagbladet (in Norwegian). Retrieved 10 October 2014. "Han mister også retten til å kjøre bil «for alltid». Det vil i praksis si fem år."
  26. ^ https://www.aftenposten.no/sport/meninger/i/rg8Bqa/petter-northug-maa-sone-i-fengsel "Da Petter Northug i 2014 ble dømt til ubetinget fengsel i 50 dager for blant annet promillekjøring, sonet han dommen med fotlenke"
  27. ^ Frölander, Martin (14 August 2014). "Audi nobbar Northug - efter spritskandalen". Expressen (in Swedish). Retrieved 25 April 2019.
  28. ^ "Northugs far: - Petter har ikke mestret overgangen".
  29. ^ Mueller, Hanne Skjellum; Skjerdingstad, Anders; Carlsen, Jørund Wessel; Tingve, Pål Marius (14 August 2020). "Politiet etter narkotikabeslag og råkjøring: – Northug har vært samarbeidsvillig". NRK (in Norwegian). Retrieved 15 August 2020.
  30. ^ Holm-Nilsen, Sverre (15 August 2020). "Rusmistanke førte til ransakelse av Northugs bolig". NRK (in Norwegian). Retrieved 15 August 2020.
  31. ^ https://www.dagbladet.no/sport/voldsom-uenighet-om-northugs-straff/73209030 "Northug var siktet etter vegtrafikkloven for råkjøring og mobilbruk i bilen, straffelovens paragraf 231 for oppbevaring av narkotika og legemiddellovens paragraf 31 for narkotikabruk"
  32. ^ "Så mye kokain hadde han i hjemmet". 17 December 2020.
  33. ^ "Petter Northug siktet for oppbevaring av seks gram kokain og råkjøring".
  34. ^ https://www.vg.no/sport/langrenn/i/x3JGkR/trygg-trafikk-det-virker-som-northug-leker-i-trafikken "«For alltid» betyr at du ikke kan søke om å få tilbake førerkortet før om fem år." ["For always" means that one can not apply for re-instatement of driving privileges, before 5 years have passed]
  35. ^ "Northug dømt til fengsel i sju måneder". 21 December 2020.
  36. ^ https://www.vg.no/sport/langrenn/i/x3JGkR/trygg-trafikk-det-virker-som-northug-leker-i-trafikken "Det kom fram av behandlingen i Oslo Tingrett at Petter Northug hadde kjørt i over 200 km/t ved flere anledninger, to av dem i 80-sone mellom Elverum og Trysil."
  37. ^ https://www.vg.no/sport/langrenn/i/x3JGkR/trygg-trafikk-det-virker-som-northug-leker-i-trafikken "Det er heller ikke en enkel hodemist etter som det skjedde flere dager på rad at han filmer og kommenterer"
  38. ^ "Nok tårer for Northug".
  39. ^ https://www.nrk.no/norge/northug-domt-til-fengsel-i-sju-maneder-1.15296352 "«I et tidsrom på om lag 12 minutter tok siktede fire filmer av kraftige fartsøkninger mens han kjørte forbi andre biler. Samtidig kommenterte han egen kjøring, som at han ydmyket og satte på plass de som ble forbikjørt,» skriver dommeren i avgjørelsen."
  40. ^ https://www.vg.no/sport/langrenn/i/KyQq55/northug-om-livet-etter-dommen-det-har-vaert-toeffe-maaneder. Retrieved 29 June 2021
  41. ^ https://www.vg.no/nyheter/i/86RKP1/opplysninger-til-vg-petter-northug-har-faatt-innvilget-soning-paa-rusinstitusjon "Nå har han imidlertid fått innvilget søknaden om å sone på rusinstitusjon og vil isteden møte opp der innen kort tid. "
  42. ^ a b https://www.dagbladet.no/sport/veldig-veldig-lang-vei-a-ga/74153501. Retrieved 31 August 2021
  43. ^ "NORTHUG JR. Petter". FIS-Ski. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 6 January 2020.

External links[edit]

Media related to Petter Northug at Wikimedia Commons

Awards
Preceded by
Norwegian Sportsperson of the Year
2009
2015
Succeeded by