St. Croix County, Wisconsin

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Saint Croix County, Wisconsin
St. Croix County Courthouse 1.jpg
Old St. Croix County Courthouse
Map of Wisconsin highlighting Saint Croix County
Location in the U.S. state of Wisconsin
Map of the United States highlighting Wisconsin
Wisconsin's location in the U.S.
Founded 1849
Seat Hudson
Largest city Hudson
Area
 • Total 736 sq mi (1,906 km2)
 • Land 722 sq mi (1,870 km2)
 • Water 13 sq mi (34 km2), 1.8%
Population
 • (2010) 84,345
 • Density 117/sq mi (45/km2)
Congressional district 7th
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5
Website co.saint-croix.wi.us

St. Croix County is a county in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2010 census, the population was 84,345.[1] Its county seat is Hudson.[2] The county was created in 1840 (then in the Wisconsin Territory) and organized in 1849.[3]

St. Croix County is part of the Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI Metropolitan Statistical Area. Between 2000 and 2010, it was the fastest-growing county in Wisconsin.[4]

Soils of St. Croix County
Soils of Willow River State Park area

History[edit]

St. Croix County of 1840 and today

St. Croix County was created on August 3, 1840[5] by the legislature of the Wisconsin Territory. It was named after the river on its western border.[6] Sources vary on the origin of the name; the St. Croix River may have been named after Monsieur St. Croix, an explorer who drowned at the mouth of the river late in the seventeenth century. Another account credits Father Hennepin with giving this region the French name Ste Croix (Holy Cross) because of the burial markers located at the mouth of the river.[7]

La Pointe County (now extinct, see Bayfield County) was created from the northern portions of Wisconsin Territory's St. Croix County on February 19, 1845.[8] When Wisconsin was admitted into the union as a state on May 29, 1848, the territorial St. Croix County was further divided, with the territory from the Mississippi River to the current border of Minnesota continuing as de facto Wisconsin Territory until on March 3, 1849,[9][10][11] it and unorganized federal territory lying north of Iowa were used in the creation of the Minnesota Territory.[12] Itasca, Washington, Ramsey and Benton Counties were created by the Minnesota Territory on October 27, 1849[13] from the de facto Wisconsin Territory that had been separated from the Wisconsin Territory's La Pointe County.

The part of St. Croix County allocated to Wisconsin became the parental county to Pierce and Polk Counties, and formed significant portions of Dunn, Barron, Washburn and Burnett Counties.

On June 12, 1899, a deadly F5 tornado struck New Richmond. The tornado's damage path was 300 yards (270 m) wide and 30 miles (48 km) long. The tornado formed on the banks of the St. Croix River, south of Hudson. Moving to the northeast across St. Croix County, the tornado passed through the villages of Burkhardt and Boardman before striking New Richmond head on, destroying a vast majority of the town. The storm continued on towards the northeast, narrowly missing the town of Deer Park before crossing into Polk County, where it again narrowly missed the town of Clear Lake, before striking the towns of Richardson and Clear Lake. Once the tornado passed into Barron County, it struck the town of Arland before breaking up southwest of Barron. The tornado killed 117 people in St Croix, Polk and Barron Counties, 64 in New Richmond alone. It has since been established as the 9th deadliest tornado in U.S. history.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 736 square miles (1,910 km2), of which 722 square miles (1,870 km2) is land and 13 square miles (34 km2) (1.8%) is water.[14]

Major highways[edit]

Airport[edit]

New Richmond Regional Airport (KRNH) serves the county and surrounding communities.

National protected area[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

2000 Census Age Pyramid for St. Croix County.
Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 809
1850 624 −22.9%
1860 5,392 764.1%
1870 11,035 104.7%
1880 18,956 71.8%
1890 23,139 22.1%
1900 26,830 16.0%
1910 25,910 −3.4%
1920 26,106 0.8%
1930 25,455 −2.5%
1940 24,842 −2.4%
1950 25,905 4.3%
1960 29,164 12.6%
1970 34,354 17.8%
1980 43,262 25.9%
1990 50,251 16.2%
2000 63,155 25.7%
2010 84,345 33.6%
Est. 2016 88,029 [15] 4.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[16]
1790–1960[17] 1900–1990[18]
1990–2000[19] 2010–2014[1]

As of the census[20] of 2000, there were 63,155 people, 23,410 households, and 16,948 families residing in the county. The population density was 88 people per square mile (34/km²). There were 24,265 housing units at an average density of 34 per square mile (13/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.85% White, 0.28% Black or African American, 0.25% Native American, 0.62% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.22% from other races, and 0.76% from two or more races. 0.76% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 34.4% were of German, 19.3% Norwegian, 8.2% Irish and 5.4% Swedish ancestry.

There were 23,410 households out of which 38.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.60% were married couples living together, 7.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.60% were non-families. 21.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the county, the population was spread out with 27.90% under the age of 18, 8.20% from 18 to 24, 32.20% from 25 to 44, 21.90% from 45 to 64, and 9.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 100.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.50 males.

Communities[edit]

The sign for St. Croix County on US63

Cities[edit]

Villages[edit]

Towns[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Politics[edit]

Presidential election results[21]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 55.2% 26,222 36.8% 17,482 8.0% 3,804
2012 55.2% 25,503 43.1% 19,910 1.8% 812
2008 51.0% 22,837 47.3% 21,177 1.8% 807
2004 54.2% 22,679 44.9% 18,784 0.9% 372
2000 50.9% 15,240 43.7% 13,077 5.5% 1,637
1996 35.6% 8,253 49.0% 11,384 15.4% 3,576
1992 31.6% 8,114 40.0% 10,281 28.4% 7,281
1988 46.3% 9,960 52.9% 11,392 0.8% 181
1984 52.5% 11,367 46.8% 10,127 0.7% 141
1980 42.6% 9,265 46.9% 10,203 10.6% 2,299
1976 41.2% 7,685 56.8% 10,601 2.1% 386
1972 52.5% 8,553 46.0% 7,488 1.5% 250
1968 46.6% 6,595 48.1% 6,807 5.3% 746
1964 33.9% 4,565 65.9% 8,864 0.2% 29
1960 52.8% 7,113 47.1% 6,341 0.2% 24
1956 55.7% 6,956 44.1% 5,499 0.2% 29
1952 59.8% 7,607 40.0% 5,094 0.2% 25
1948 40.4% 4,326 57.7% 6,173 1.9% 202
1944 53.0% 5,660 46.2% 4,930 0.8% 88
1940 57.7% 6,857 41.2% 4,898 1.0% 121
1936 38.5% 4,316 41.7% 4,679 19.8% 2,223
1932 37.9% 4,059 59.6% 6,374 2.5% 265
1928 62.2% 6,855 37.0% 4,083 0.8% 88
1924 39.7% 3,600 7.9% 718 52.4% 4,755
1920 73.3% 5,601 21.5% 1,638 5.2% 398
1916 51.1% 2,731 44.0% 2,352 4.9% 262
1912 37.2% 1,728 38.9% 1,806 24.0% 1,114
1908 62.3% 3,228 34.2% 1,773 3.5% 181
1904 68.3% 3,898 27.5% 1,569 4.2% 238
1900 59.0% 3,368 36.4% 2,076 4.7% 266
1896 56.4% 3,462 40.3% 2,475 3.3% 203
1892 47.0% 2,467 42.3% 2,220 10.6% 557

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Wisconsin: Individual County Chronologies". Wisconsin Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2007. Retrieved August 15, 2015. 
  4. ^ https://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/census/2011-03-10-wisconsin-census_N.htm
  5. ^ Laws of the Territory of Wisconsin. Belmont and Milwaukee, 1836–1848. no. 20, sec. 1/pp. 25-6
  6. ^ "Winnebago Took Its Name from an Indian Tribe". The Post-Crescent. December 28, 1963. p. 14. Retrieved August 25, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  7. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-26. Retrieved 2008-08-19.  History of St. Croix County
  8. ^ Laws of the Territory of Wisconsin. Belmont and Milwaukee, 1836–1848. 1845 pp. 52-3
  9. ^ Statutes at Large of the United States of America, 1789–1873. 17 vols. Boston: Little, Brown, 1845–1874. vol. 9, ch. 89 [1846]/pp. 56-58
  10. ^ Statutes at Large of the United States of America, 1789–1873. 17 vols. Boston: Little, Brown, 1845–1874. vol. 9, ch. 50 [1848]/pp. 233-235
  11. ^ Van Zandt, Franklin K. Boundaries of the United States and the Several States. Geological Survey Professional Paper 909. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1976. pp. 128-130
  12. ^ Statutes at Large of the United States of America, 1789–1873. 17 vols. Boston: Little, Brown, 1845–1874.vol. 9, ch. 121 [1849]/pp. 403-9
  13. ^ Session Laws of the Territory of Minnesota. St. Paul, 1850-1857. [1849] ch. 5, secs. 2-5, 7-9, 19-20/pp. 7-9
  14. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2015. 
  15. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  16. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 9, 2015. 
  17. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 9, 2015. 
  18. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 9, 2015. 
  19. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved August 9, 2015. 
  20. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  21. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 45°02′N 92°27′W / 45.04°N 92.45°W / 45.04; -92.45