Switzerland men's national basketball team

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Switzerland
Swiss Basketball logo.svg
FIBA ranking60 Increase 1 (9 August 2021)[1]
Joined FIBA1932 (co-founders)
FIBA zoneFIBA Europe
National federationSwiss Basketball
CoachIlias Papatheodorou
Nickname(s)Nati
(National Team)
Rossocrociati
(Red Crosses)
Olympic Games
Appearances3
MedalsNone
FIBA World Cup
AppearancesNone
EuroBasket
Appearances5
MedalsNone
First international
  Switzerland 42–9 Romania 
(Geneva, Switzerland; 2 May 1935)
Biggest win
  Switzerland 68–19 Scotland 
(Paris, France; 11 May 1951)
Biggest defeat
  Switzerland 53–130 Spain 
(Geneva, Switzerland; 24 November 1988)

The Switzerland men's national basketball team (French: Équipe de Suisse de basketball, German: Schweizer Basketballnationalmannschaft, Italian: Nazionale di pallacanestro della Svizzera, Romansh: Squadra naziunala da ballape da la Svizra) represents Switzerland in international basketball. The managing body for the national team is Swiss Basketball.

Switzerland has qualified to five EuroBasket tournaments (1935, 1946, 1951, 1953, 1955) in their history. The national team has also made three appearances at the Olympic Games (1936, 1948, 1952). However, Switzerland has struggled over the past decades to once again reach global tournaments. As they also continue their pursuit to clinch their debut trip to the FIBA World Cup.

History[edit]

EuroBasket 1935[edit]

Switzerland hosted the first European Basketball Championship in Geneva at EuroBasket 1935. The national team finished fourth in the ten team tournament, defeating Romania and Italy in the preliminary round to advance to the semifinals. There they lost to Latvia, resulting in a playoff for third place against Czechoslovakia which the Swiss lost 25-23.

EuroBasket 1946[edit]

Switzerland did not play in the European championship again until the post-war, at EuroBasket 1946, which they hosted. There, they placed second in their three-team preliminary group after losing to the eventual champions Czechoslovakia 20-17, but defeating Belgium 38-33. That preliminary round finish put the Swiss into a 5th/6th place playoff against the Netherlands, which Switzerland won 36-25.

EuroBasket 1951[edit]

The next Swiss entry into the European Basketball Championship was at the EuroBasket 1951 tournament in Paris. Switzerland finished the preliminary round with a 1-3 record, 4th in their group. They fared little better in the first classification, taking 3rd in the group with a 1-2 record. In the second classification round, the Swiss won the classification 13-16 and 13/14 games to finish in 13th place of 18 teams, with a 4-5 record.

EuroBasket 1953[edit]

EuroBasket 1953 in Moscow was the fourth appearance of the Swiss. The tournament began poorly for the team, as they finished last in their preliminary pool at 0-3. It got somewhat better for them after that, as they took second in their first classification pool with 2 wins and a loss. They dropped their 9-12 semifinal to Belgium, but defeated Finland in the 11/12 final to take 11th of 17 overall.

EuroBasket 1955[edit]

Switzerland competed next at the EuroBasket 1955 tournament in Budapest. Their 2-2 record in preliminary round put them in 3rd of the five-team group and relegated them to the classification rounds. They had similar results there, again taking a 2-2 record and 3rd of 5 teams. They won their classification 13-16 semifinal, but lost to Austria in the 13/14 game to finish 14th of 18 teams.

Later years[edit]

The 1952 Summer Olympics and the 1955 EuroBasket are the last major international basketball tournaments that the country qualified for. Since then, it lost its international significance despite occasional strong showings at qualification games. E.g. Switzerland surprisingly beat former European Champion Russia at the qualification for the 2015 EuroBasket.

Competitive record[edit]

Results and fixtures[edit]

  Win   Loss

2020[edit]

20 February 2020 Georgia  96–880(OT)   Switzerland Tbilisi, Georgia
16:00 Scoring by quarter: 17–8, 25–21, 16–24, 21–26Overtime: 17–9
Pts: Burjanadze 21
Rebs: Shermadini 13
Asts: McFadden 6
Boxscore Pts: Kazadi 22
Rebs: Jurkovitz, Kazadi 10
Asts: Kazadi 10
Arena: Tbilisi Sports Palace
Attendance: 7,099[2]
Referees: Wojciech Liszka (POL), Tanel Suslov (EST), Goran Sljivić (AUT)
23 February 2020 Switzerland   64–69  Finland Fribourg, Switzerland
19:15 Scoring by quarter: 21–11, 15–10, 14–22, 14–26
Pts: Mlađan 12
Rebs: Jurkovitz 12
Asts: Jurkovitz, Kazadi 3
Boxscore Pts: Salin 25
Rebs: Madsen 10
Asts: Maxhuni 5
Arena: Salle Saint-Lèonard
Referees: Sergii Zashchu (UKR), Igor Mitrovski (MKD), Gvidas Gedvilas (LTU)
28 November 2020 Switzerland   92–90  Serbia Espoo, Finland* [note 1]
16:30 Scoring by quarter: 28–25, 21–19, 24–28, 19–18
Pts: M. Mlađan 18
Rebs: Kazadi 8
Asts: Kazadi 7
Boxscore Pts: Avramović 23
Rebs: Apić 6
Asts: three players 4
Arena: Espoo Metro Areena
Referees: Sergii Zashchuk (UKR), Janusz Calik (POL), Vilius Mačiulaitis (LTU)
30 November 2020 Switzerland   84–91  Georgia Espoo, Finland* [note 1]
16:00 Scoring by quarter: 24–27, 15–19, 15–19, 30–26
Pts: M. Mlađan 19
Rebs: M. Mlađan 7
Asts: Kazadi 10
Boxscore Pts: McFadden 24
Rebs: Shermadini 8
Asts: McFadden 6
Arena: Espoo Metro Areena
Referees: Janusz Calik (POL), Vilius Mačiulaitis (LTU), Beniamino Attard (ITA)

2021[edit]

19 February 2021 Finland  92–84   Switzerland Tbilisi, Georgia* [note 1]
16:00 Scoring by quarter: 23–19, 26–12, 22–17, 21–36
Pts: Koponen 21
Rebs: Madsen 6
Asts: Koponen, Valtonen 4
Boxscore Pts: Kovac 18
Rebs: Kazadi 7
Asts: Kazadi 10
Arena: Tbilisi Sports Palace
Referees: Tolga Sahin (ITA), Apostolos Kalpakas (SWE), Sergei Beliakov (RUS)
21 February 2021 Serbia  88–81   Switzerland Tbilisi, Georgia* [note 1]
16:00 Scoring by quarter: 21–21, 18–20, 19–28, 30–12
Pts: Petrušev 22
Rebs: Avramović 9
Asts: Anđušić 6
Boxscore Pts: D. Mlađan 18
Rebs: Dubas, Kazadi 5
Asts: Kazadi 8
Arena: Tbilisi Sports Palace
Referees: Georgios Poursanidis (GRE), Oskars Lucis (LAT), Apostolos Kalpakas (SWE)
12 August 2021 North Macedonia  62–67   Switzerland Skopje, North Macedonia* [note 2]
19:00 CEST (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 17–22, 8–13, 17–14, 20–18
Pts: Mekikj 16
Rebs: Wiley 13
Asts: Magdevski 6
Boxscore Pts: Kazadi 19
Rebs: Rocak 8
Asts: Kazadi 6
Arena: Sports Centre Jane Sandanski
Referees: Oskars Lucis (LAT), Fernando Calatrava (ESP), Ilias Kounelles (CYP)
13 August 2021 Switzerland   56–64  Slovakia Skopje, North Macedonia* [note 2]
19:00 CEST (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 14–11, 20–19, 25–20, 8–15
Pts: Fofana, Kazadi 12
Rebs: Jurkovitz 6
Asts: Kazadi 4
Boxscore Pts: Krajčovič 16
Rebs: Brodziansky 7
Asts: Ihring 9
Arena: Sports Centre Jane Sandanski
Referees: Tolga Sahin (ITA), Michał Proc (POL), Mehmet Karabilecen (TUR)
16 August 2021 Switzerland   61–67  North Macedonia Skopje, North Macedonia* [note 2]
19:00 CEST (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 10–18, 16–21, 20–13, 15–15
Pts: Kazadi 15
Rebs: Rocak 9
Asts: Kazadi, Rocak 4
Boxscore Pts: Mekikj 16
Rebs: Krstevski 7
Asts: Trajkovski 4
Arena: Sports Centre Jane Sandanski
Referees: Oskars Lucis (LAT), Michał Proc (POL), Mehmet Karabilecen (TUR)
17 August 2021 Slovakia  60–65   Switzerland Skopje, North Macedonia* [note 2]
19:00 CEST (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 14–15, 11–26, 13–14, 22–10
Pts: Brodziansky, Krajčovič 13
Rebs: Brodziansky 10
Asts: Krajčovič 8
Boxscore Pts: Rocak 14
Rebs: Jurkovitz 12
Asts: Kazadi 4
Arena: Sports Centre Jane Sandanski
Referees: Fernando Calatrava (ESP), Oskars Lucis (LAT), Ilias Kounelles (CYP)

2022[edit]

Team[edit]

Current roster[edit]

Roster for the 2023 FIBA World Cup Pre-Qualifiers matches on 12 to 17 August 2021 against North Macedonia and Slovakia.[5]

Switzerland men's national basketball team roster
Players Coaches
Pos. No. Name Age – Date of birth Height Club Ctr.
F 0 Michel-Ofik Nzege 28 – (1992-10-14)14 October 1992 2.03 m (6 ft 8 in) Lions de Genève Switzerland
G 6 Jonathan Kazadi 30 – (1991-06-09)9 June 1991 1.94 m (6 ft 4 in) Lille France
PG 7 Selim Fofana 22 – (1999-07-08)8 July 1999 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) Union Neuchâtel Switzerland
G/F 8 Juraj Kozić 26 – (1995-03-24)24 March 1995 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) Boncourt Switzerland
SG 9 Roberto Kovac 31 – (1990-05-02)2 May 1990 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) Lions de Genève Switzerland
G 10 Clayton Le Sann 25 – (1995-11-23)23 November 1995 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) Monthey Switzerland
F 11 Toni Rocak 22 – (1999-04-22)22 April 1999 2.03 m (6 ft 8 in) San Diego Toreros United States
PF 12 Paul Gravet 25 – (1995-12-18)18 December 1995 2.04 m (6 ft 8 in) Fribourg Switzerland
F/C 14 Jonathan Dubas 30 – (1991-03-04)4 March 1991 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) Trier Germany
F/C 20 Arnaud Cotture 26 – (1995-08-09)9 August 1995 2.03 m (6 ft 8 in) Fribourg Switzerland
PG 24 Robert Zinn 26 – (1995-02-22)22 February 1995 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) Fribourg Switzerland
F 99 Natan Jurkovitz 26 – (1995-04-04)4 April 1995 1.99 m (6 ft 6 in) Fribourg Switzerland
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)
  • Greece Dimitris Menoudakos
Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • Club – describes last
    club before the competition
  • Age – describes age
    on 12 August 2021

Depth chart[edit]

Pos. Starting 5 Bench 1 Bench 2
C Arnaud Cotture Jonathan Dubas
PF Marko Mlađan Michel-Ofik Nzege Paul Gravet
SF Natan Jurkovitz Dušan Mlađan Juraj Kozić
SG Roberto Kovac Boris Mbala
PG Jonathan Kazadi Jérémy Jaunin

Head coach position[edit]

Notable players[edit]

Past rosters[edit]

1935 EuroBasket: finished 4th among 10 teams

3 René Karlen, 4 Raymond Lambercy, 5 Mottier, 6 Jean Pare, 7 Radle, 8 Sidler, 9 Marcel Wuilleumier (Coach: ?)


1936 Olympic Games: finished 9th among 21 teams

1 Fernand Bergmann, 2 Pierre Carlier, 3 René Karlen, 4 Georges Laederach, 5 Raymond Lambercy, 6 Jean Pollet, 7 Jean Pare, 8 Marcel Wuilleumier (Coach: ?)


1946 EuroBasket: finished 5th among 10 teams

3 Georges Stockly, 4 Fernand Keller, 5 Theo Winkler, 7 Georges Gallay, 8 Henry Gujer, 10 Robert Geiser, 12 Jean Pollet, 13 Jean Pare, 15 René Wohler, 20 Louis Sanguin (Coach: ?)


1948 Olympic Games: finished 21st among 23 teams

3 Georges Stockly, 4 Henry Gujer, 5 Jean Pollet, 6 Maurice Chollet, 7 Claude Chevalley, 8 Pierre Albrecht, 9 Marcos Bossy, 10 Robert Geiser, 11 Jean Tribolet, 12 Claude Landini, 13 Jean Pare, 14 Bernard Dutoit, 15 Henri Baumann, 16 Gérald Piaget (Coach: ?)


1951 EuroBasket: finished 13th among 17 teams

3 Georges Stockly, 4 Henry Gujer, 5 Theo Winkler, 6 Arthur Bugna, 7 Henri Baumann, 8 Roger Domenjoz, 9 Marcos Bossy, 10 René Wohler, 11 René Chiappino, 12 Bernard Dutoit, 13 Albert Hermann, 14 Roger Prahin, 15 Francis Perroud (Coach: ?)


1952 Olympic Games: finished 20th among 23 teams

3 Georges Stockly, 4 Pierre Albrecht, 5 Jacques Redard, 6 Gérald Cottier, 7 Henri Baumann, 8 Roger Domenjoz, 9 Marcos Bossy, 10 René Wohler, 11 René Chiappino, 12 Marcel Moget, 13 Maurice Chollet, 14 Roger Prahin, 15 Bernard Schmied, 16 Jean-Pierre Voisin (Coach: ?)


1953 EuroBasket: finished 11th among 17 teams

3 André Laverniaz, 4 Pierre Albrecht, 5 Jacques Redard, 6 Henri Devaud, 7 Albert Hermann, 8 René Hofmann, 9 Marcos Bossy, 10 Gérald Cottier, 11 René Chiappino, 12 Jean Emery, 13 Pierre Wittwer, 14 Michel Currat, 15 Jean-Pierre Voisin, 16 Ruggero Balmelli (Coach: ?)


1955 EuroBasket: finished 14th among 18 teams

4 Pierre Albrecht, 5 Jacques Redard, 6 Michel Currat, 7 Henri Baumann, 8 V Bally, 9 C Sevelley, 10 Gérald Cottier, 11 Marcos Bossy, 12 René Chiappino, 13 M Etter, 14 C Lambrecht, 15 Jean-Pierre Voisin, 16 P Worte, 17 M Robert (Coach: ?)

Kit[edit]

Manufacturer[edit]

[edit]

2017: Tissot[7]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all matches in the November 2020 and February 2021 windows were played behind closed doors in select host cities.[3]
  2. ^ a b c d Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all matches during the European Pre-Qualifiers second round window in August 2021 were played behind closed doors in select host cities.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "FIBA Ranking Presented by Nike". FIBA. 9 August 2021. Retrieved 9 August 2021.
  2. ^ "Impressive attendances open FIBA EuroBasket 2022 Qualifiers". Retrieved 22 February 2020.
  3. ^ "Statement regarding the November 2020 and February 2021 Qualifiers". Retrieved 18 September 2020.
  4. ^ "Find out who is hosting the European Pre-Qualifiers Second Round". Retrieved 10 June 2021.
  5. ^ "Iceland during the 2023 FIBA World Cup European Pre-Qualifiers in Aug. 2021". Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  6. ^ "Un entraîneur de renom à la tête de l'équipe de Suisse". Retrieved 13 July 2021. (in French)
  7. ^ a b FIBA EuroBasket 2017, FIBA.com, Retrieved 31 August 2017.

External links[edit]

Videos[edit]