Talk:Kifli

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Untitled[edit]

Khm, the story is great, but there was no Turkish raid on Buda (& Pest) in 1686, because the city was under Turkish occupation since 1541... In fact, 1686 saw it liberated by Austria and other western allies from the Turkish... --Sicboy 02:02, 31 December 2005 (UTC)

Origin of word[edit]

There was a mistake inserted into the text, and in order not to see the same mistake again, hereby I quote (quickly translating) from the "Etimológiai szótár" that the word "kifli" is first recorded in 1785, and is of an Austrian German origin, "Kipfel", having the same meaning. And (being a Hungarian myself), this particular food had the same name since decades. So the claim that the name was coined from a pop group's name is misleading and clearly untrue. By the way, what I just said about the etymology might fit well in the Wiktionary. 84.3.190.36 (talk) 16:06, 23 November 2007 (UTC)

Unsigned[edit]

Thery're really hard to find in Alabama. Apparently you have to know a Hungarian person who's kind enough to make some for you. And apparently they're only made during the christmas season. 72.148.31.106

Well. You have the recipe, so you can make it ewery day. if you wish

Warrington (talk) 13:03, 7 September 2008 (UTC)

Rediredt from kifle[edit]

I, being a Croat living in Serbia, enjoy Kifli a lot. Lots of Serbs in my city (Cacak) refer to them as Kifle, as the plural form. Thanks. Mateom28 (talk) 02:23, 13 December 2011 (UTC)


Nicely written[edit]

My family hails from the Carpathian Mountains (Rusyn), and although considered to be Slovak, we consider ourselves Rusyn in heritage. We used to fill our Kifli with finely ground walnut filling, lekvar, and raspberry and apricot preserves. The dough is the tricky part, as butter and eggs must be incorporated into the mixture (butter around 2°C, eggs near room temp). It must also be folded and rolled to create the "flakiness" necessary for the proper texture. Thanks to all who contributed to this wonderful article.PA MD0351XXE (talk) 06:56, 27 June 2012 (UTC)

Assessment comment[edit]

The comment(s) below were originally left at Talk:Kifli/Comments, and are posted here for posterity. Following several discussions in past years, these subpages are now deprecated. The comments may be irrelevant or outdated; if so, please feel free to remove this section.

The reference to the "widely popular pop group" is a prank and should be deleted. Follow the link--it's a group of friends messing around. Arankine (talk) 06:37, 11 December 2008 (UTC)

Last edited at 06:37, 11 December 2008 (UTC). Substituted at 21:12, 29 April 2016 (UTC)


Bratislavske rozky[edit]

Perhaps the section on sweets should also contain "Bratislavske rozky" which are probably also derived from the same type of bread (and their name contains the word "rozok" as well). — Preceding unsigned comment added by 188.167.151.24 (talk) 13:15, 5 June 2017 (UTC)