University of Bordeaux

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University of Bordeaux
Université de Bordeaux
Sceau bordeaux univ.gif
University seal
Type Public
Established 7 June 1441
Endowment 700 million
President Manuel Tunon de Lara
Academic staff
4,000
Students 48,000
Location Bordeaux, Nouvelle-Aquitaine, France

The University of Bordeaux (French: Université de Bordeaux) was founded in 1441 in France. In 1970, the University was split up in four separate universities. It was reestablished on 1 January 2014 from the merger of three of the new universities: Bordeaux 1, Victor Segalen University (Bordeaux 2), and Montesquieu University (Bordeaux 4). The University of Bordeaux is part of the Community of universities and higher education institutions of Aquitaine.

History[edit]

The original Université de Bordeaux was established by the papal bull of Pope Eugene IV on 7 June 1441 when Bordeaux was an English town. The initiative for the creation of the university is attributed to Archbishop Pey Berland. It was originally composed of four faculties: arts, medicine, law, and theology. The law faculty later split into faculties of civil law and canon law. A professorship in mathematics was founded in 1591 by Bishop François de Foix, son of Gaston de Foix, Earl of Kendal.

This university was disestablished in 1793, and then was re-founded on 10 July 1896.

In 1970 the university was split into three universities: Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux 2, and Bordeaux 3. In 1995, Bordeaux 4 split off from Bordeaux 1.

In 2007 the universities were grouped together as Communauté d'universités et établissements d'Aquitaine

From 1 January 2014, the university of Bordeaux were reunited, except for Bordeaux 3 which chose not to take part to the merger.[1]

Notable alumni[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]