Bartlett v. Strickland

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Bartlett v. Strickland
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued October 14, 2008
Decided March 9, 2009
Full case name Gary Bartlett, Executive Director of the North Carolina State Board of Elections, et al., Petitioners v. Dwight Strickland, et al.
Citations 556 U.S. 1 (more)
128 S.Ct. 1648
Prior history Cert. to the Supreme Court of North Carolina
Holding
A minority group must constitute a numerical majority of the voting-age population in an area before §2 of the Voting Rights Act would require the creation of a legislative district to prevent dilution of that group’s votes.
Court membership
Case opinions
Majority Kennedy, joined by Roberts, Alito
Concurrence Thomas, joined by Scalia
Dissent Souter, joined by Stevens, Ginsburg, Breyer
Dissent Ginsburg
Dissent Breyer

Bartlett v. Strickland, 556 U.S. 1 (2009), is a United States Supreme Court case in which, in a plurality decision, the Court held that a minority group must constitute a numerical majority of the voting-age population in an area before §2 of the Voting Rights Act would require the creation of a legislative district to prevent dilution of that group’s votes. The decision struck down a North Carolina redistricting plan that attempted to preserve minority voting power in a state legislative district that was 39 percent black. Justice Kennedy delivered the decision and was joined by Justices Alito and Roberts. Justice Thomas filed a concurring opinion that was joined by Justice Scalia. Justice Souter filed a dissenting opinion that was joined by Justices Stevens, Ginsburg, and Breyer. Justices Ginsburg and Breyer also filed separate dissenting opinions.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]