London Buses route 11

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11
London General bus LT55 (LTZ 1055), route 11, 21 September 2013 (3).jpg
Overview
Operator London General
Garage Stockwell (SW)
Vehicle New Routemaster
Peak vehicle requirement 26
Night-time Night Bus N11
Route
Start Fulham Broadway
Via King's Road
Parliament Square
Aldwych
St Paul's Cathedral
End Liverpool Street bus station
Length 7 miles (11 km)
Service
Level Daily
Frequency 7–10 minutes
Journey time 35–80 minutes
Operates 05:15 until 01:30

London Buses route 11 is a Transport for London contracted bus route in London, England. Running between Fulham Broadway and Liverpool Street bus station, it is operated by London General.

History[edit]

AEC Routemaster in June 1993

Route 11 was introduced by the London General Omnibus Company in August 1906, and is amongst the oldest routes to have operated continuously in London, although its route has changed on several occasions.[1] It was the first route operated by London Road-Car Co Ltd, running from Victoria to Hammersmith via Chelsea.[2] From 1916, LGOC B-type buses allocated to Old Kent Road garage were used until 1924, when it was allocated to Kingston garage.[3]

On 5 August 1922, Leyland LB (London Bus) type buses were introduced on route 11 by Arthur George Partridge and Christopher Dodson Ltd with chocolate livery and the fleet name "Express".[4][5][6][7][8][9] The first AEC NS-Type buses entered service on route 11 in May 1923.[10] On 5 September 1932, Q1 buses were used on this route which operated from Liverpool Street to Shepherd's Bush.[11][12][13]

In May 1949, Leyland Titan RTW buses were introduced on route 11.[14] AEC Regent III RT buses were in service on route 11 in the 1950s.[15] On 12 June 1959, the fourth AEC Routemaster to in passenger service (RM14), entered service on route 11 from Riverside garage.[16]

The route starts at Fulham Broadway and operates via the West End and some of London's most famous landmarks to Liverpool Street bus station. The journey from the top deck is a cheap means of sightseeing in London.[17] It previously ran to Hammersmith until being replaced west of Fulham Broadway on 17 July 1993 by route 211.

In October 1996, London General buses operating on route 11 from its Waterloo garage switched to City Diesel.[18]

On 4 June 2002, Queen Elizabeth II's Golden Jubilee, the Metropolitan Police flagged down a Number 11 bus and used it as temporary transport for twenty-three peaceful anti-royalty demonstrators whom they had arrested after the demonstration, most of them in a nearby pub. The bus was used to take the protestors to various police stations for questioning. The protesters sued the police, and the Met settled out of court with an apology, an admission of unlawful detention, and a payment of £3,500 to each protester.[19]

It has been operated by London General since the privatisation of London bus services.[20] It was operated out of Waterloo garage until June 2002, when the AEC Routemasters were transferred to Stockwell garage to make way for the Red Arrow Mercedes-Benz Citaro articulateds. On 1 November 2003, route 11 was converted to one man operation with the AEC Routemasters replaced by Wright Eclipse Gemini bodied Volvo B7TLs.[21]

The route has a cameo appearance in the 2005 film The Da Vinci Code, where the protagonists take a number 11 bus from near Temple Church to get to "Chelsea Library", though they get off at Westminster Abbey; this is the same route the bus takes in real life.

Upon being re-tendered, the route was retained by London General with a new contract commencing on 30 October 2010 for five years with a two-year option.[22] On 21 September 2013, route 11 returned to crewed operation with the introduction of New Routemasters.[23][24][25]

Current route[edit]

The bus route passes many tourist attractions including:[26]

It also goes near the Royal Exchange, Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese, Royal Courts of Justice, St Clement Danes, Aldwych tube station, High Commission of Australia, Savoy Hotel, Nelson's Column, Admiralty Arch, Big Ben, Palace of Westminster and New Scotland Yard.[27] The Daily Telegraph called the route one of the "best routes for sightseeing on a shoestring".[28]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Aldridge, John (February 1998). "On the 11...". Buses (Ian Allan Publishing) (515): 12. 
  2. ^ Graeme Bruce, J; Curtis, Colin (1977). The London Motor Bus: Its Origins and Development. London Transport. p. 3. ISBN 0853290830. 
  3. ^ Graeme Bruce, J; Curtis, Colin (1977). The London Motor Bus: Its Origins and Development. London Transport. p. 16. ISBN 0853290830. 
  4. ^ Berguer, David (2013). Under the Wires at Tally Ho: Trams and Trolleybuses of North London 1905-1962. The History Press. ISBN 9780750953535. 
  5. ^ Hibbs, John (1989). The History of British Bus Services. David & Charles. p. 88. On 5 August 1922, A. G. Partridge drove his chocolate and primrose bus on Route 11 
  6. ^ Berguer, David (2013). Under the Wires at Tally Ho: Trams and Trolleybuses of North London 1905-1962. The History Press. 
  7. ^ Day, John (1973). The Story of the London Bus: London and its buses from the horse bus to the present day. London Transport. p. 62. ISBN 9780853290377. 
  8. ^ Graeme Bruce, J; Curtis, Colin (1977). The London Motor Bus: Its Origins and Development. London Transport. p. 33. ISBN 0853290830. 
  9. ^ "1924 Leyland LB5 – "Chocolate Express"". London Bus Museum. Retrieved 29 June 2014. 
  10. ^ Reed, John (2000). London Buses: A Brief History. Capital Transport Publishing. p. 22. ISBN 9781854142337. 
  11. ^ Reed, John (2000). London Buses: A Brief History. Capital Transport Publishing. p. 30. ISBN 9781854142337. 
  12. ^ Graeme Bruce, J; Curtis, Colin (1977). The London Motor Bus: Its Origins and Development. London Transport. p. 65. ISBN 0853290830. 
  13. ^ Day, John (1973). The Story of the London Bus: London and its buses from the horse bus to the present day. London Transport. p. 71. ISBN 9780853290377. 
  14. ^ Graeme Bruce, J; Curtis, Colin (1977). The London Motor Bus: Its Origins and Development. London Transport. p. 93. ISBN 0853290830. 
  15. ^ Graeme Bruce, J; Curtis, Colin (1977). The London Motor Bus: Its Origins and Development. London Transport. p. 89. ISBN 0853290830. 
  16. ^ Day, John (1973). The Story of the London Bus: London and its buses from the horse bus to the present day. London Transport. p. 104. ISBN 9780853290377. 
  17. ^ Gibson, Helen (11 April 2006). "Got a ticket to ride". Time. Retrieved 28 August 2010. 
  18. ^ "Untitled". Petroleum Review 51 (600): 121. January 1997. The same results have been reported from London General which operates Route 11 from its Waterloo garage and also switched to City Diesel last October. 
  19. ^ Dodd, Vikram (5 February 2004). "The day the Number 11 bus became a prison for 23 anti-royal protesters". The Guardian. Retrieved 23 June 2013. 
  20. ^ Bus tender results Route 11/N11 Transport for London 10 December 2009
  21. ^ Famous Route 11 Loses its Routemasters Amid Cover-up London Bus Routes 31 October 2003
  22. ^ Stockwell celebrates five-year route retention Bus Talk (Go-Ahead London) issue 2 February 2010
  23. ^ Hoscik, Martin (29 May 2013). "Boris announces second route to operate New Bus for London". MayorWatch. Retrieved 23 June 2013. 
  24. ^ "'Cleanest, greenest' bus runs from Hampstead Heath to Pimlico". ITV. 21 June 2013. Retrieved 23 June 2013. 
  25. ^ Beard, Matthew (21 June 2013). "Red-letter day for the Boris bus as it masters a complete route". Evening Standard. Retrieved 23 June 2013. 
  26. ^ Wittich, John (1997). London Bus-Top Tourist. Sigma Leisure. pp. 22–54. ISBN 9781850584308. 
  27. ^ Porter, Laura. "Number 11 London Bus". About. Retrieved 2 January 2014. 
  28. ^ Edwards, Rhiannon (29 April 2014). "Tube strike? See more of London by bus". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 29 April 2014. 

External links[edit]