Nissan J engine

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Nissan J engine
Datsun J15 engine.jpg
Overview
Manufacturer Nissan Motors
Combustion chamber
Configuration Inline-4
Displacement
  • 1.3L
  • 1.5L
  • 1.6L
  • 2.0L
Cylinder block alloy Cast iron
Cylinder head alloy Cast iron
Valvetrain OHV
Combustion
Fuel system Carburetor
Chronology
Successor Nissan L engine

The Nissan J engine was a straight-4 gasoline internal combustion engine produced by Nissan in the 1960s through the 1980s.

J13[edit]

An OHV engine of 1,299 cc (79.3 cu in), the J13 was used in the 1964 to 1967 Datsun 411 sedan and wagon (originally only in the sporting "SS" series). Bore and stroke are 73.0 x 77.0 mm.[1] It was also produced for the Nissan 520 and 521 trucks from 1967 to 1969 when it was replaced by the Nissan L engine. Mexican-assembled Bluebird 510s also received the J13 engine. The J13 was rated at 67 hp (50 kW).

J15[edit]

The larger (1.5-litre) J15 was introduced in the Datsun 521 Truck in 1969 and saw use in various Nissan Pickup Trucks like the 720 in various overseas markets through the 1970s and 1980s. It was also used in certain sedans like the 710. It was also used in the PA321 Datsun Cabstar. The J15 produces 77 PS (57 kW).

J16[edit]

A 1.6-litre iteration of the OHV J-series four cylinders was also built, mainly for utility vehicles. Bore and stroke are 78.0 x 82.0 mm for a total displacement of 1,567 cc. This engine was also installed by Nissan's Taiwanese partner Yue Loong in several iterations of the Nissan Violet, long after Nissan themselves had stopped using OHV engines in passenger cars.

Applications:

J20[edit]

The J20 is a 2.0 L (1,994 cc) engine. It produces 109 hp (81 kW) and was used in the 1965-73 Nissan Cedric. A version of Volkswagen's two-litre, "JL" five-cylinder engine was used in the (Nissan) Volkswagen Santana with 110–140 PS (81–103 kW) and was called the "J" engine by Nissan, but it shares nothing with the original J20 even though it happens to have the same exact displacement.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Quattroruote Speciale: Tutte le Auto del Mondo 1967 (in Italian). Milano: Editoriale Domus S.p.A. February 1967. p. 195. 
  2. ^ Bent, Alan. "1966 Datsun Homer T641 Model". earlydatsun.com. Retrieved 2011-02-07. 
  3. ^ Quattroruote: Tutte le Auto del Mondo 77/78 (in Italian). Milano: Editoriale Domus S.p.A. 1977. pp. 554–556.