Roselle Park, New Jersey

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Roselle Park, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Roselle Park
Roselle Park Welcome Sign
Roselle Park Welcome Sign
Map of Roselle Park in Union County. Inset: Location of Union County in New Jersey.
Map of Roselle Park in Union County. Inset: Location of Union County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Roselle Park, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Roselle Park, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°39′55″N 74°16′00″W / 40.665265°N 74.266706°W / 40.665265; -74.266706Coordinates: 40°39′55″N 74°16′00″W / 40.665265°N 74.266706°W / 40.665265; -74.266706[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Union
Incorporated March 22, 1901
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Joseph Accardi (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Clerk Doreen Cali[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.232 sq mi (3.191 km2)
 • Land 1.232 sq mi (3.191 km2)
 • Water 0.000 sq mi (0.000 km2)  0.00%
Area rank 481st of 566 in state
19th of 21 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 79 ft (24 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9][10]
 • Total 13,297
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 13,512
 • Rank 188th of 566 in state
14th of 21 in county[12]
 • Density 10,792.7/sq mi (4,167.1/km2)
 • Density rank 30th of 566 in state
1st of 21 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07204[13][14]
Area code(s) 908 Exchanges: 241, 245, 259, 298, 620[15]
FIPS code 3403964650[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885380[18][2]
Website www.rosellepark.net
Chestnut Street

Roselle Park is a borough in Union County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 13,297,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 16 (+0.1%) from the 13,281 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 476 (+3.7%) from the 12,805 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Roselle Park was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 22, 1901, from portions of Union Township.[20][21] The separation occurred due to a number of grievances based on a lack of sufficient public services, including; lack of a modern sewage system, poor schools, neglected roads, and minimal public safety measures.[22]

Geography[edit]

Roselle Park is located at 40°39′55″N 74°16′00″W / 40.665265°N 74.266706°W / 40.665265; -74.266706 (40.665265,-74.266706). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.232 square miles (3.191 km2), all of which was land.[1][2]

The borough is bordered to the northeast by Union Township, to the northwest by Kenilworth, to the east by Elizabeth, to the south by Roselle and to the west by Cranford.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 3,138
1920 5,438 73.3%
1930 8,969 64.9%
1940 9,661 7.7%
1950 11,537 19.4%
1960 12,546 8.7%
1970 14,277 13.8%
1980 13,377 −6.3%
1990 12,805 −4.3%
2000 13,281 3.7%
2010 13,297 0.1%
Est. 2012 13,512 [11] 1.6%
Population sources:
1910-1920[23] 1910-1930[24]
1930-1990[25] 2000[26][27] 2010[7][8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 13,297 people, 5,002 households, and 3,406 families residing in the borough. The population density was 10,792.7 per square mile (4,167.1 /km2). There were 5,231 housing units at an average density of 4,245.8 per square mile (1,639.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 73.72% (9,802) White, 5.89% (783) Black or African American, 0.15% (20) Native American, 10.18% (1,354) Asian, 0.02% (2) Pacific Islander, 7.52% (1,000) from other races, and 2.53% (336) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 28.65% (3,809) of the population.[8]

There were 5,002 households, of which 32.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.9% were married couples living together, 13.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.9% were non-families. 26.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.28.[8]

In the borough, 22.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 29.8% from 25 to 44, 27.7% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.9 years. For every 100 females there were 95.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.0 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $61,923 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,415) and the median family income was $75,017 (+/- $8,553). Males had a median income of $50,502 (+/- $5,243) versus $41,193 (+/- $5,261) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,566 (+/- $2,011). About 3.6% of families and 5.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.0% of those under age 18 and 1.9% of those age 65 or over.[28]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 13,281 people, 5,137 households, and 3,416 families residing in the borough. The population density was 10,855.7 people per square mile (4,203.1/km2). There were 5,258 housing units at an average density of 4,297.8 per square mile (1,664.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 80.87% White, 2.42% African American, 0.11% Native American, 9.14% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 4.89% from other races, and 2.55% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 16.34% of the population.[26][27]

There were 5,137 households out of which 30.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.8% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.5% were non-families. 28.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.22.[26][27]

In the borough the population was spread out with 22.2% under the age of 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 33.5% from 25 to 44, 22.8% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 95.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.4 males.[26][27]

The median income for a household in the borough was $53,717, and the median income for a family was $63,403. Males had a median income of $42,623 versus $33,105 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,101. About 3.4% of families and 4.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 1.6% of those age 65 or over.[26][27]

History[edit]

The first known settlement within what is now the Borough was built by Samuel Williams, in 1700. Galloping Hill Road was continually used by revolutionary war scouts, delivering messages to and from General George Washington and Governor Livingston. Galloping Hill Road also believed to be the route traveled by the British columns en route to the Battle of Connecticut Farms, battling the New Jersey militia the entire way. Son of American general William Crane, was bayoneted and killed by the British near what is now Galloping Hill Road and Colonial Road.[29]

Elizabethtown & Somerville Railroad passed through in 1839, as the first railroad in Northern New Jersey. The first store in the world to be lit by electric light was Stone's Store on Westfield Avenue, lit by Thomas Edison's carbon filament prototype. In 1907, the first poured concrete building in the world, now the Robert Gordon School, was built in Roselle Park using Edison's revolutionary process. Roselle Park was home to the factory and lab of Marconi Wireless Telegraph, and became the site of the first regularly broadcast radio station, "WDY".[29]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Post Office
Municipal Complex

The Borough of Roselle Park is governed under the Borough form of municipal government by an elected Mayor and a six-member Borough Council.[5] Roselle Park is divided into five election districts, referred to as wards, with one Councilperson elected from each ward, and one Councilperson elected at large. The Mayor is elected to a four-year term and Councilpersons are elected to three-year terms.[30]

As of 2013, the Mayor Of Roselle Park is Joseph Accardi (R, term ends December 31, 2014).[31] Members of the Borough Council are Council President Modesto "Moe" Miranda, Jr. (Ward 4; R, 2013), Andrew Casais (Ward 1; R, 2014), Carl A. Hokanson (At Large; D, 2014), Charlene Storey (Ward 2; D, 2015), Tanya Torres (Ward 3; R, 2013) and Michael Yakubov (Ward 5; R, 2015).[30][32][33][34][35]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Roselle Park is located in the 10th Congressional District[36] and is part of New Jersey's 21st state legislative district.[9][37][38] Prior to the 2010 Census, Roselle Park had been part of the 7th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[39]

New Jersey's Tenth Congressional District is represented by Donald Payne, Jr. (D, Newark).[40] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[41][42] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[43][44]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 21st Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Thomas Kean, Jr. (R, Westfield) and in the General Assembly by Jon Bramnick (R, Westfield) and Nancy Munoz (R, Summit).[45][46] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[47] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[48]

Union County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose nine members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis with three seats coming up for election each year, with an appointed County Manager overseeing the day-to-day operations of the county. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Chairman and Vice Chairman from among its members.[49] As of 2014, Union County's Freeholders are Chairman Christopher Hudak (D, Linden, term ends December 31, 2014),[50] Vice Chairman Mohamed S. Jalloh (D, Roselle, 2015),[51] Bruce Bergen (D, Springfield Township, 2015),[52] Linda Carter (D, Plainfield, 2016),[53] Angel G. Estrada (D, Elizabeth, 2014),[54] Sergio Granados (D, Elizabeth, 2016)[55] Bette Jane Kowalski (D, Cranford, 2016),[56] Alexander Mirabella (D, Fanwood, 2015)[57] and Vernell Wright (D, Union, 2014).[58][59] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Joanne Rajoppi (D, Union, 2015),[60] Sheriff Ralph Froehlich (D, Union, 2016)[61] and Surrogate James S. LaCorte (D, Springfield Township, 2014).[62][63] The County Manager is Alfred Faella.[64]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 7,525 registered voters in Roselle Park, of which 2,325 (30.9% vs. 41.8% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,279 (17.0% vs. 15.3%) were registered as Republicans and 3,918 (52.1% vs. 42.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[65] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 56.6% (vs. 53.3% in Union County) were registered to vote, including 72.9% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.6% countywide).[65][66]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 3,064 votes here (59.9% vs. 66.0% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 1,931 votes (37.7% vs. 32.3%) and other candidates with 75 votes (1.5% vs. 0.8%), among the 5,117 ballots cast by the borough's 7,841 registered voters, for a turnout of 65.3% (vs. 68.8% in Union County).[67][68] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 3,083 votes here (53.5% vs. 63.1% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 2,530 votes (43.9% vs. 35.2%) and other candidates with 96 votes (1.7% vs. 0.9%), among the 5,759 ballots cast by the borough's 7,953 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.4% (vs. 74.7% in Union County).[69] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 2,753 votes here (50.6% vs. 58.3% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 2,619 votes (48.1% vs. 40.3%) and other candidates with 43 votes (0.8% vs. 0.7%), among the 5,443 ballots cast by the borough's 7,773 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.0% (vs. 72.3% in the whole county).[70]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,700 votes here (49.2% vs. 41.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,404 votes (40.6% vs. 50.6%), Independent Chris Daggett with 249 votes (7.2% vs. 5.9%) and other candidates with 41 votes (1.2% vs. 0.8%), among the 3,455 ballots cast by the borough's 7,711 registered voters, yielding a 44.8% turnout (vs. 46.5% in the county).[71]

Education[edit]

The Roselle Park School District serves public school students in Kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2010-11 school year, the district's five schools had an enrollment of 2,049 students and 166.3 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.32:1.[72] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[73]) are Aldene Elementary School[74] (K-5; 268 students), Robert Gordon Elementary School[75] (K-5; 263), Sherman Elementary School[76] (K-5; 334), Roselle Park Middle School[77] (6-8; 475) and Roselle Park High School[78] (9-12; 626).[79][80]

Library[edit]

The Roselle Park Veterans Memorial Library was renamed in the early 1980s in honor of the veterans of Roselle Park who made the building possible. The library currently has more than 10,000 square feet (930 m2) of space used to store traditional books in addition to computers, books on tape, videos, CD's, Meeting Room, information center, pictures, and music tapes. The library offers a photocopier and fax service and allows its patrons to reserve and renew materials over the phone and online. The library offers free Wi-Fi access.[81]

The Veterans Memorial Library offers an array of events for an older audience such as charity projects, book discussions, and a Book of the Month Club.[82] The Veterans Memorial Library also caters to children and young teens with many different events. Events such as Homework Help, No Bullying Resources, and Crazy For Crafts, among other things, are offered free of charge and children are encouraged to participate.[83]

Railroads[edit]

Roselle Park has a rich railroading heritage. A steam locomotive adorns the Borough seal, and the town is very welcoming to railroad enthusiasts.

The Elizabethtown & Somerville railway began laying rails through what would become Roselle Park in 1839. It eventually became the Central Railroad of New Jersey between Jersey City, New Jersey and Scranton, Pennsylvania. Throughout the years as traffic grew, the line would grow to four main tracks, and also offered trains of Reading Company and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.[29]

Roselle Park and Roselle formerly shared a rail station on the CNJ mainline. Passenger service east of Bayonne ended on April 30, 1967. Shuttle service between Bayonne and Cranford continued on until August 1978 but eventually ended, resulting in the closure of the old station on Chestnut Street.[84] The line continued to see operation as an access route to the NJTransit/NJDOT railroad shops at Elizabethport until the mid-1980s. It is currently out of service and unused, as the Conrail Elizabeth Industrial Track.

Competition would come as the Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company realized that railroading was a more efficient mode of transportation for their coal than a canal system. They formed the Lehigh Valley Railroad, and began building Eastward in 1853. By 1872, they had reached Roselle, and formed the subsidiary Newark and Roselle Railway in order to continue building East to the Hudson River. April 1, 1976 the Lehigh Valley Railroad became part of the Consolidated Rail Corporation, also known as Conrail and became known as their "Lehigh Line". On June 1, 2001, Conrail was purchased and split between Norfolk Southern (60%) and CSX (40%), and became "shared assets". Conrail continues to operate the Lehigh Line. In addition to New Jersey Transit the line sees anywhere from 35-45 freights per day from four railroads; Conrail, Norfolk Southern, CSX, and tri-weekly Canadian Pacific (formerly Delaware and Hudson Railway). The track is Norfolk Southern's primary access route into and out of the New York City metropolitan area, and is also part of CSX's primary North-South corridor.

The Roselle Park Train Station offers New Jersey Transit commuter rail service as part of their Raritan Valley Line service. This was a result of the Aldene Connection in Roselle Park between tracks of the Central Railroad and Lehigh Valley Railroad, which opened April 30, 1967, allowing passengers to travel directly to Newark Penn Station and New York Penn Station, rarther than traveling to the Central Railroad of New Jersey Terminal in Jersey City and taking ferries into Manhattan.[85] Currently the station is located at milepost 16.0 on the Conrail Lehigh Line, on the corner of Chestnut Street and West Lincoln Avenue; the same location of the original Lehigh Valley station. In addition to local travel, from here, one take the train to Newark, New Jersey or New York City and connect to various modes of travel to nearly anywhere in the U.S. and Canada on Amtrak.

The town was also once served by the Rahway Valley Railroad. The line was exempted in 1991 by then Rahway Valley Railroad controller Delaware Otsego Corporation, and was given to the County of Union.[86] It has remained dormant since. However, beginning in 2004, the Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders began taking steps to reactivate the routes. They named the Morristown and Erie Railway as designated operator and funded the beginning of right-of-way renewal, though the project has faced opposition from residents who believe that the line would be used to transport trash.[87] Currently the Morristown and Erie Railway is awaiting further funding to complete the work. As of 2011, the project has halted and no further steps are being taken to reactivate the railway.[citation needed]

Other transportation[edit]

Route 28 passes through Roselle Park, and the Garden State Parkway skirts the western boundary of the borough. New Jersey Transit Bus Operations provides bus service on the 58 with service from Elizabeth to Kenilworth, on the 94 to Newark and on the 113 to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York City.[88]

Newark Liberty International Airport is approximately 10 minutes away. Linden Airport, a general aviation facility, is in nearby Linden.

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Roselle Park include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Roselle Park. Accessed March 13, 2011.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 90.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Roselle Park, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  7. ^ a b 2010 Census Populations: Union County, Asbury Park Press. Accessed December 10, 2011.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Roselle Park borough, Union County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 22, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 9. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
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  53. ^ Freeholder Vice Chairman Linda Carter, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  54. ^ Freeholder Angel G. Estrada, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  55. ^ Freeholder Sergio Granados, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  56. ^ Freeholder Bette Jane Kowalski, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
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  58. ^ Freeholder Vernell Wright, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
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  84. ^ Frassinelli, Mike. "NJ Transit opens Bayonne 8th Street Station, extending Hudson-Bergen Light Rail service", The Star-Ledger, January 31, 2011. Accessed September 3, 2013. "Bayonne Mayor Mark Smith was in high school when that part of downtown Bayonne waved goodbye to train service nearly 33 years ago. 'The last time a train rolled out of here was in August of 1978, headed for Cranford and points west,' he said. For 113 years previously, Smith said, Bayonne had been part of the reliable Jersey Central railroad system that linked the state."
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