Springfield Township, Union County, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Springfield Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Springfield
First Congregation of the Presbyterian Church at Springfield
First Congregation of the Presbyterian Church at Springfield
Map of Springfield Township in Union County. Inset: Location of Union County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Springfield Township in Union County. Inset: Location of Union County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Springfield Township, Union County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Springfield Township, Union County, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°41′52″N 74°20′04″W / 40.697899°N 74.33452°W / 40.697899; -74.33452Coordinates: 40°41′52″N 74°20′04″W / 40.697899°N 74.33452°W / 40.697899; -74.33452[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Union
Formed April 14, 1794
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government[6]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Richard Huber (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator Anthony Cancro[4]
 • Clerk Linda Donnelly[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 5.193 sq mi (13.449 km2)
 • Land 5.174 sq mi (13.400 km2)
 • Water 0.019 sq mi (0.049 km2)  0.37%
Area rank 271st of 566 in state
9th of 21 in county[2]
Elevation [7] 138 ft (42 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10][11]
 • Total 15,817
 • Estimate (2012[12]) 16,862
 • Rank 161st of 566 in state
12th of 21 in county[13]
 • Density 3,057.2/sq mi (1,180.4/km2)
 • Density rank 211th of 566 in state
18th of 21 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07081[14][15]
Area code(s) 908 and 973[16]
FIPS code 3403970020[17][2][18]
GNIS feature ID 0882213[19][2]
Website www.springfield-nj.us

Springfield Township is a township in Union County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 15,817, the highest recorded at any decennial census,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 1,388 (+9.6%) from the 14,429 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,009 (+7.5%) from the 13,420 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Springfield was formed as a township on April 14, 1794, from portions of Elizabeth Township and Newark Township, while the area was still part of Essex County, and was incorporated as one of New Jersey's first 104 townships by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. It became part of the newly formed Union County on March 19, 1857, with portions remaining in Essex County used to create Millburn. Other portions of the township have been taken to form New Providence Township (November 8, 1809, now known as Berkeley Heights), Livingston (February 5, 1813), Summit (March 23, 1869) and Cranford (March 14, 1871).[21]

The Battle of Springfield was fought here, the last of many battles of the American Revolutionary War to be fought in New Jersey.

Springfield is the home of the Baltusrol Golf Club, which was the host to the 2005 PGA Championship. It has also hosted other golf major championships, including the U.S. Open, held on seven occasions at Baltusrol, most recently in 1993. Golfweek magazine ranked Baltusrol as the 36th best in its 2010 rankings of the "Best Classic Courses" in the country.[22]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Springfield as the 85th best place to live in New Jersey in its 2010 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[23]

History[edit]

Springfield is celebrated as the site of a Battle of Springfield between the American Continental Army and British forces on June 23, 1780. The British, under Hessian General Wilhelm von Knyphausen, advanced from Elizabethtown about 5 o'clock in the morning. They were opposed by General Nathanael Greene, but owing to the superior number of the enemy he was compelled to evacuate Springfield, which was then burned by the British. During the action the Rev. James Caldwell, chaplain in the New Jersey brigade, is said to have distributed the Watts hymn books from the neighboring Presbyterian Church among the soldiers for wadding, saying at the same time, "Now put Watts into them, boys." This battle prevented further advance on the part of the British. The American loss was about 15 and that of the British about 150.[24]

Some historical landmarks from the Revolution still stand: the Cannon Ball House, which has since been converted into a museum was (according to the township's official website) "Built circa 1741 and served as a farmhouse at the time of the Revolutionary War. During the Battle of Springfield (June 23, 1780) the British used it as a hospital. ... It was one of only three buildings left standing when all others including the Presbyterian Church where Reverend James Caldwell had taken Watts hymnbooks for rifle wadding, were set on fire. ... In later years the house became a tavern to serve travelers on Morris (Ave) Turnpike. The farmland was later sold off, and it served then as a private residence. The property was acquired by the Springfield Historical Society in 1955. It has become known as The Cannon Ball House because a cannonball was found on the west side embedded in a beam. ... The Cannon Ball House has five revolutionary era rooms, some American Civil War items, early tools, a Battle diorama and a colonial garden. It has just been (1998) renovated to its original appearance and color."[25] Springfield's First Presbyterian Church, which had been burned by the British, was rebuilt, using much of the original structure and it remains at 210 Morris Avenue. The statue of a Continental Soldier out front is the smallest state park in New Jersey.[26]

Geography[edit]

The Township of Springfield is located on the northern edge of Union County and is bordered by Millburn to the north in Essex County, by Union Township to the east, by Kenilworth to the southeast, by Westfield and Cranford to the south, by Mountainside to the southwest and by Summit to the northwest.

Springfield Township is located at 40°41′52″N 74°20′04″W / 40.697899°N 74.33452°W / 40.697899; -74.33452 (40.697899,-74.33452). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 5.193 square miles (13.449 km2), of which, 5.174 square miles (13.400 km2) of it is land and 0.019 square miles (0.049 km2) of it (0.37%) is water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 2,360
1820 1,804 * −23.6%
1830 1,656 −8.2%
1840 1,651 −0.3%
1850 1,945 17.8%
1860 1,020 * −47.6%
1870 770 * −24.5%
1880 844 * 9.6%
1890 959 13.6%
1900 1,073 11.9%
1910 1,246 16.1%
1920 1,715 37.6%
1930 3,725 117.2%
1940 4,148 11.4%
1950 7,214 73.9%
1960 14,467 100.5%
1970 15,740 8.8%
1980 13,955 −11.3%
1990 13,420 −3.8%
2000 14,429 7.5%
2010 15,817 9.6%
Est. 2012 16,862 [12] 6.6%
Population sources:
1810-1920[27] 1840[28]
1850-1870[29] 1850[30] 1870[31]
1880-1890[32] 1890-1910[33] 1910-1930[34]
1930-1990[35] 2000[36][37] 2010[9][10][11]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[21]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 15,817 people, 6,511 households, and 4,265 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,057.2 per square mile (1,180.4 /km2). There were 6,736 housing units at an average density of 1,302.0 per square mile (502.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 82.46% (13,042) White, 6.25% (989) Black or African American, 0.06% (10) Native American, 7.70% (1,218) Asian, 0.01% (2) Pacific Islander, 1.75% (277) from other races, and 1.76% (279) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 9.50% (1,502) of the population.[9]

There were 6,511 households, of which 29.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.6% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.5% were non-families. 29.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 3.05.[9]

In the township, 21.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 26.4% from 25 to 44, 29.3% from 45 to 64, and 17.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.9 years. For every 100 females there were 88.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.7 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $84,038 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,139) and the median family income was $111,359 (+/- $8,121). Males had a median income of $74,335 (+/- $7,959) versus $62,859 (+/- $6,250) for females. The per capita income for the township was $46,393 (+/- $3,175). About 2.9% of families and 6.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 5.6% of those age 65 or over.[38]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 14,429 people, 6,001 households, and 4,014 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,801.8 people per square mile (1,081.8/km²). There were 6,204 housing units at an average density of 1,204.7 per square mile (465.1/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 89.72% White, 3.72% African American, 0.02% Native American, 4.69% Asian, 0.96% from other races, and 0.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.14% of the population.[36][37]

There were 6,001 households out of which 27.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.9% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.1% were non-families. 28.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.98.[36][37]

In the township the population was spread out with 20.6% under the age of 18, 4.7% from 18 to 24, 29.4% from 25 to 44, 24.7% from 45 to 64, and 20.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 89.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.0 males.[36][37]

The median income for a household in the township was $73,790, and the median income for a family was $85,725. Males had a median income of $55,907 versus $39,542 for females. The per capita income for the township was $36,754. About 1.8% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.0% of those under age 18 and 5.8% of those age 65 or over.[36][37]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

The Township of Springfield is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6] At an annual reorganization meeting usually held on the first day of January, the committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.[3]

As of 2014, the members of the Township Committee are Mayor Richard Huber (D, term on committee ends December 31, 2016; term as mayor ends 2014), Deputy Mayor David Barnett (D, term on committee ends 2015; term as deputy mayor ends 2014), Margaret Bandrowski (D, 2015), Jerry Fernandez (R, 2016) and Ziad Andrew Shehady (R, 2014).[3][39][40][41][42]

In the November 2012 general election, voters approved the formation of a Charter Study Commission that will consider the possibility of changing the existing township form of government and may recommend changing to one the forms available under the Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council, Council-Manager, Small Municipality or Mayor-Council-Administrator), one of the other available forms or to leave the form of government unchanged.[43]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Springfield Township is located in the 7th Congressional District[44] and is part of New Jersey's 21st state legislative district.[10][45][46]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[47] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[48][49] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[50][51]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 21st Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Thomas Kean, Jr. (R, Westfield) and in the General Assembly by Jon Bramnick (R, Westfield) and Nancy Munoz (R, Summit).[52][53] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[54] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[55]

Union County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose nine members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis with three seats coming up for election each year, with an appointed County Manager overseeing the day-to-day operations of the county. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Chairman and Vice Chairman from among its members.[56] As of 2014, Union County's Freeholders are Chairman Christopher Hudak (D, Linden, term ends December 31, 2014),[57] Vice Chairman Mohamed S. Jalloh (D, Roselle, 2015),[58] Bruce Bergen (D, Springfield Township, 2015),[59] Linda Carter (D, Plainfield, 2016),[60] Angel G. Estrada (D, Elizabeth, 2014),[61] Sergio Granados (D, Elizabeth, 2016)[62] Bette Jane Kowalski (D, Cranford, 2016),[63] Alexander Mirabella (D, Fanwood, 2015)[64] and Vernell Wright (D, Union, 2014).[65][66] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Joanne Rajoppi (D, Union, 2015),[67] Sheriff Ralph Froehlich (D, Union, 2016)[68] and Surrogate James S. LaCorte (D, Springfield Township, 2014).[69][70] The County Manager is Alfred Faella.[71]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 10,078 registered voters in Springfield Township, of which 3,271 (32.5% vs. 41.8% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,795 (17.8% vs. 15.3%) were registered as Republicans and 5,007 (49.7% vs. 42.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5 voters registered to other parties.[72] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 63.7% (vs. 53.3% in Union County) were registered to vote, including 80.7% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.6% countywide).[72][73]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 4,083 votes here (55.3% vs. 66.0% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 3,179 votes (43.0% vs. 32.3%) and other candidates with 63 votes (0.9% vs. 0.8%), among the 7,388 ballots cast by the township's 10,772 registered voters, for a turnout of 68.6% (vs. 68.8% in Union County).[74][75] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 4,328 votes here (53.9% vs. 63.1% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 3,548 votes (44.2% vs. 35.2%) and other candidates with 82 votes (1.0% vs. 0.9%), among the 8,033 ballots cast by the township's 10,379 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.4% (vs. 74.7% in Union County).[76] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 4,246 votes here (55.1% vs. 58.3% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 3,372 votes (43.8% vs. 40.3%) and other candidates with 49 votes (0.6% vs. 0.7%), among the 7,703 ballots cast by the township's 9,885 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.9% (vs. 72.3% in the whole county).[77]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 2,477 votes here (46.0% vs. 41.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 2,447 votes (45.5% vs. 50.6%), Independent Chris Daggett with 359 votes (6.7% vs. 5.9%) and other candidates with 28 votes (0.5% vs. 0.8%), among the 5,380 ballots cast by the township's 10,214 registered voters, yielding a 52.7% turnout (vs. 46.5% in the county).[78]

Education[edit]

The Springfield Public Schools serve students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2010-11 school year, the district's five schools had an enrollment of 2,158 students and 162.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.27:1.[79] All of the township's schools are named after notable Springfieldians. For instance, the township's High School is named after Jonathan Dayton, a signer of the United States Constitution. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[80]) are Edward V. Walton Early Childhood Center[81] (grades Pre K-2; 623 students), James Caldwell Elementary School[82] (3-5; 214), Thelma L. Sandmeier Elementary School[83] (3-5; 210), Florence M. Gaudineer Middle School[84] (6-8; 451) and Jonathan Dayton High School (9-12; 561).[85][86]

Adjacent to Florence M. Gaudineer Middle School is Saint James the Apostle School, a Catholic school serving grades Pre-Kindergarten thru 8 with an enrollment of 148 students, operating under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark.[87][88]

Transportation[edit]

A number of major highways and roadways pass through Springfield, including Interstate 78, U.S. Route 22, Route 24, and Route 124, as well as CR 509 Spur and CR 577.

New Jersey Transit provides bus service to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan in New York City and to points in New Jersey including Newark Penn Station. Parking is available for a fee at a municipal lot near the center of town (Hannah Street and Center Street) and in the Duffy's Corner lot at Morris and Caldwell place, which provide easy access to all New Jersey Transit buses that run through town. Annual permits are available from the town hall.

Although there is no train station in Springfield, the Millburn and Short Hills New Jersey Transit stations are located nearby although neither allows commuter-hour parking for out of town residents and very limited parking hours even on weekends. The closest stations that allow out-of-town residents access to parking are Maplewood and Summit, although both also are full to capacity very early on weekdays. The 70 provides access from the center of town to NJ Transit's Summit and Millburn stations; Eastbound it terminates at NJ Transit's Newark Penn Station with connections to Amtrak, NJTransit trains to New York Penn Station and to Port Authority Trans-Hudson (PATH) service. The township also runs a jitney that operates on weekdays during morning and evening rush hours from the community pool to NJ Transit's Short Hills station.[89] NJ Transit buses 65, 66 and 70 (to Newark), the 114 (to Midtown Manhattan's Port Authority Bus Terminal) and local service on the 52 route also run along the town's major roadways.[90]

Newark Liberty International Airport is approximately 10 miles (16 km) east of Springfield.

Historical transportation[edit]

The Rahway Valley Railroad passed through the community, and during the early 20th Century offered both freight and passenger service, but is currently out of service. The section of the railway that extended from Springfield to Summit was taken out of service in 1976, though special trains were operated to provide service to Baltusrol during the 1980 U.S. Open.[91]

A trolley line called the Morris County Traction Company, ran trolley service through Springfield to/from Newark and Morris County, in the early part of the 20th Century.[92]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of the Township of Springfield include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ a b c Mayor/Township Committee, Springfield Township. Accessed January 21, 2014.
  4. ^ Administration Office, Township of Springfield. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  5. ^ Township Clerk, Township of Springfield. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  6. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 94.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Springfield, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ "2010 Census Populations: Union County", Asbury Park Press. Accessed August 30, 2011.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Springfield township, Union County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 12, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 9. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Springfield township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 30, 2011.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Springfield, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 30, 2011.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 20, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Springfield, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 20, 2013.
  17. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 31, 2012.
  19. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed May 20, 2013.
  21. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 240. Accessed February 12, 2012.
  22. ^ "2010 Golfweek’s Best Classic Courses", Golfweek Magazine, March 11, 2010. Accessed March 16, 2010.
  23. ^ "Best Places to Live 2010", New Jersey Monthly, February 11, 2010. Accessed March 16, 2010.
  24. ^ "The Final Invasion" The 225th Anniversary of the Battle of Springfield June 25-26, 2005, The Third New Jersey Regiment. Accessed October 20, 2013.
  25. ^ Township of Springfield History, Township of Springfield. Accessed December 4, 2005.
  26. ^ Springfield Township Today, Township of Springfield. Accessed October 20, 2013.
  27. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  28. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  29. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 281, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed May 23, 2013. "Springfield had a population in 1860 of 1,020, and in 1870, 770."
  30. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 138. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  31. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 261. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  32. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  33. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 339. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  34. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  35. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  36. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Springfield township, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 20, 2013.
  37. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Springfield township, Union County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 20, 2013.
  38. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Springfield township, Union County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 12, 2012.
  39. ^ County Clerk Elections: Roselle Park - Winfield, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed May 22, 2013.
  40. ^ Union County 2011 General, November 8, 2011, Union County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  41. ^ Union Co 2012 General/School Election November 6, 2012, Union County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  42. ^ Result.htm Union County 2013 General/School Election November 5, 2013, Union County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed January 21, 2014.
  43. ^ Bulger, Adam. "November Ballot Will Feature Charter Commission Question: Voters can decide if Springfield needs a change in government.", SpringfieldPatch, September 5, 2012. Accessed May 23, 2013. "The commission would recommend one of four types of government approved by the 1923 [sic] Faulkner Act: a Mayor-Council form, a Council-Manager plan, a Small Municipality plan and a Mayor-Council-Administrator plan."
  44. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  45. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  46. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  47. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  48. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  49. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  50. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  51. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  52. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 2, 2014.
  53. ^ District 21 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 2, 2014.
  54. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  55. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  56. ^ County Government, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  57. ^ Freeholder Christopher Hudak, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  58. ^ Freeholder Mohamed S. Jalloh, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  59. ^ Bruce Bergen, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  60. ^ Freeholder Vice Chairman Linda Carter, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  61. ^ Freeholder Angel G. Estrada, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  62. ^ Freeholder Sergio Granados, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  63. ^ Freeholder Bette Jane Kowalski, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  64. ^ Freeholder Alexander Mirabella, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  65. ^ Freeholder Vernell Wright, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  66. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  67. ^ Union County Clerk, Joanne Rajoppi, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  68. ^ Union County Sheriff Ralph Froehlich, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  69. ^ Surrogate, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  70. ^ Elected Officials – Clerk – Sheriff – Surrogate, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  71. ^ County Manager, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  72. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Union, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  73. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  74. ^ Presidential November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Union County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  75. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Union County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  76. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Union County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  77. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Union County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  78. ^ 2009 Governor: Union County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  79. ^ District information for the Springfield School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  80. ^ Data for the Springfield Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  81. ^ Edward V. Walton Early Childhood Center, Springfield Public Schools. Accessed October 20, 2013.
  82. ^ James Caldwell Elementary School, Springfield Public Schools. Accessed October 20, 2013.
  83. ^ Thelma L. Sandmeier Elementary School, Springfield Public Schools. Accessed October 20, 2013.
  84. ^ Florence M. Gaudineer Middle School, Springfield Public Schools. Accessed October 20, 2013.
  85. ^ Site Map, Springfield Public Schools. Accessed October 20, 2013.
  86. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Springfield Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 20, 2013.
  87. ^ Saint James the Apostle School. Accessed May 30, 2008.
  88. ^ Union County Elementary Schools, Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark. Accessed August 30, 2011.
  89. ^ Jitney Schedule, Township of Springfield. Accessed May 23, 2103.
  90. ^ Union County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed August 30, 2011.
  91. ^ Boright, Walter E. "Rahway Valley Railroad: The little railroad that helped build Kenilworth, Part II", Cranford Chronicle, May 12, 2011. Accessed May 23, 2013. "In 1976 the offices moved into a railroad club car placed on a Kenilworth siding. That year the section from Springfield to Summit was closed."
  92. ^ Rae, John W. Morristown: A Military Headquarters of the American Revolution, p. 118. Arcadia Publishing, 2002. ISBN 073852400X. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  93. ^ Jacobson, Steve. "Put College Before Coach", Newsday, February 17, 1993. Accessed January 27, 2011. "In the locker room the coach, who grew up in Springfield, N.J., flung the lunches and kicked them."
  94. ^ George Armstrong Halsey, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed June 27, 2007.
  95. ^ Capuzzo, Jill P. "The Tangled Journey Of a Governor's Wife", The New York Times, November 7, 2004. Accessed December 30, 2007. "The McGreeveys will be moving out of Drumthwacket, the governor's Greek Revival mansion in Princeton, and go their separate ways -- she to a red-brick ranch she bought for an undisclosed price in Springfield, Union County."
  96. ^ "Debra Olarsch and Paul Denson Marry, The New York Times, November 25, 1990. Accessed April 10, 2012. "Debra Marcie Olarsch, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert I. Olarsch of Springfield, N.J., was married last evening to Paul Winfield Denson, a son of Dr. and Mrs. H. Bruce Denson of Woodcliff Lake, N.J."
  97. ^ Jordan, Chris. "Drummer Bernard 'Pretty' Purdie has kept the time to your life", Asbury Park Press, October 4, 2013. Accessed October 5, 2013. "Purdie eventually moved to Jersey — Teaneck and Edison before settling in Springfield."
  98. ^ Whiteside, Kelly. USA's Reyna personifies perseverance, USA Today, June 2, 2006. Accessed August 30, 2011. "Reyna's father, Miguel, is from Argentina, where he played professionally, and his mother, Maria, is from Portugal. His parents immigrated to New Jersey in the late 1950s, then settled a decade later in Springfield, N.J., where Reyna was raised."
  99. ^ Witchel, Alex. "FIELD TRIP; Give Me That Lower East Side Mix", The New York Times, January 27, 2002. Accessed April 10, 2012. "Unfortunately, they weren't around long. His mother died of leukemia when Mr. Ross was 14, his father of a cerebral hemorrhage when his son was 19. After Mr. Ross graduated from Boston University, his grandfather moved into the family home in Springfield, N.J.; the two were inseparable."
  100. ^ Kleinfeld, N. R. "Man in the News; Theologian as Educator: George Erik Rupp", The New York Times, February 2, 1993. Accessed February 20, 2011. "George Erik Rupp was born in Summit, N.J., on Sept. 22, 1942, and grew up in Springfield, N.J."
  101. ^ McCall, Tris. "MTV Video Music Awards 2011: Cobra Starship rocks pre-show", The Star-Ledger, August 28, 2011. Accessed May 23, 2013. "Frontman Gabe Saporta, who lived in Springfield and went to high school in West Orange, was once the bassist and singer in Midtown, a roughneck pop-punk band that shared more with earnest Saves the Day than poppy Panic! at the Disco."
  102. ^ Lustig, Jay. "Cobra Starship flies with 'Snakes on a Plane'.", The Star-Ledger, December 15, 2006. "With his new band, Cobra Starship, former Springfield resident Gabe Saporta was able to get one of his songs accepted for the soundtrack of the movie Snakes on a Plane."
  103. ^ Prell, Edward. "Banks' 2 Run Pinch Hit in 8th Beats Indians, 4-2", Chicago Tribune, March 25, 1959. Accessed February 6, 2011. "The run of the mine phenom is Joe Schaffernoth, 21, ... from Springfield, NJ."
  104. ^ Jackson, Herb; Stile, Charles; and Pillets, Jeff. "SCHUNDLER WINS; CONSERVATIVE JERSEY CITY MAYOR STUNS FRANKS.", The Record (Bergen County), June 27, 2001. Accessed May 23, 2013. "'Bob Franks got sucked into this race without having any kind of a message,' said Kevin Scholla, a 27-year-old Republican committeeman from Springfield. 'He appears to be simply an opportunist.'"
  105. ^ "At Home With Zygi Wilf", WCCO-TV, November 21, 2005. Accessed May 2, 2007. "'It's probably like the quarterback who has to run all the plays,' he says, steering his car into the cul-de-sac where his large French Chateau-style house sits in Springfield, a community that is made up largely of Jewish and Italian families."
  106. ^ Rivera, Ray. "A Rising Star", The Seattle Times, January 9, 2005. Accessed April 7, 2008. "Jimmy, as his parents called him, grew up Lutheran in the small New Jersey town of Springfield."

External links[edit]