Alfa Romeo G1

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Alfa Romeo G1
Alfa romeo g1 limousine.jpg
Overview
ManufacturerAlfa Romeo
Production1921-1923
AssemblyPortello, Milan, Italy
DesignerGiuseppe Merosi
Body and chassis
ClassLuxury car
Body styleLimousine
LayoutFR layout
Powertrain
Engine6,330 cc I6 sidevalve 70 bhp
Transmission4-speed manual with reverse gear
Dimensions
Wheelbase3,400 mm (130 in)
Length4,494 mm (176.9 in)
Curb weight1500 kg (3306 lbs)
Chronology
PredecessorA.L.F.A 40/60 HP
SuccessorAlfa Romeo RL

The Alfa Romeo G1 (1921–23) was an Italian automobile.

It was the first all-new design from Alfa Romeo after the end of the A.L.F.A. brand. It was designed by A.L.F.A. pioneer Giuseppe Merosi as the factory's new luxury vehicle. At the same time, Merosi revised the prewar 24HP racing car into the 20/30ES model. At this time, he was engaged in a legal dispute with Nicola Romeo regarding the brand takeover conditions.[1]

1920 Alfa Romeo G1 advertisement: Per il 1920 nuovo modello G1 6 cilindri 35-50 HP Gran Lusso. Milano–Società anonima Ing. Nicola Romeo & Co–Milano

The chassis was lengthened and stiffened from the 1914 A.L.F.A. 40-60 HP model, entering into market territory competition with Rolls-Royce. A new 6.3 L (384 cu in) straight-6 engine was introduced, producing 70 bhp (52 kW) and 216 lb⋅ft (293 N⋅m) of torque.[2] The G1 achieved a maximum speed of 86 miles per hour (138 km/h), winning its production class at the Coppa del Garda race.[2]

Total production was only 52 copies. It found almost no customers in Italy, and all 50 (except for 2 prototypes) found their way to Australia. Chassis 6001 and 6002 was built in 1920 as prototypes, whereas 6003 to 6052 was built mostly in 1921.[3][4]

This chassis number 6018 is possibly the only remaining G1. It was auctioned for US$445,000 in 2018, after having been rebuilt from its original to a tipo corsa racing car.[5][6]

Only one known survivor exists as of 2019, chassis 6018. It was in 2007 owned by New Zealand's Alfa importer and is also the oldest surviving Alfa Romeo-branded car.[7][8]

The Alfa Romeo G2, a planned improved version, was never produced after the commercial failure of the G1.[who?]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "P. Italiano: 'Story of the Alfa Romeo factory and plants : part 1 the early Portello'". AISA. Archived from the original on 2007-11-11. Retrieved 2008-04-14.
  2. ^ a b "1921 Alfa Romeo G1". conceptcarz.com. Retrieved 2008-03-25.
  3. ^ Stefano d'Amico and Maurizio Tabucchi, Le vetture di produzione -- Alfa Romeo -- Production cars, 2 volumes, ISBN 978-8879114080, 2nd edition, 2008.
  4. ^ Doubts of the period 1910 to 1923 - GURU Quest, discussion on alfabb.com, 2003
  5. ^ Disillusioned Pebble Beach concours at alfabb.com, 2013.
  6. ^ Photos of Alfa G1 when in Australia/Tasmania, discussion in alfabb.com in 2015.
  7. ^ "Press Release: Alfa Romeo". scoop.co.nz. Retrieved 2007-07-03.
  8. ^ "Oldest Alfa moves from farm to fame". drive.com.au. 2005. Archived from the original on 2012-03-25. Retrieved 2010-08-29.

External links[edit]