Aslanhane Mosque

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Aslanhane Mosque
Aslanhane Mosque.jpg
Portal of Aslanhane Mosque
Religion
AffiliationIslam
Location
LocationAnkara, Turkey
Aslanhane Mosque is located in Turkey
Aslanhane Mosque
Location of the mosque in Turkey
Geographic coordinates39°56′12″N 32°51′55″E / 39.93667°N 32.86528°E / 39.93667; 32.86528
Architecture
Architect(s)Ebubekir Mehmet
TypeMosque
StyleSeljuk architecture
Completed1290; 729 years ago (1290)
Specifications
Minaret(s)1
MaterialsFace stone and Rubble stone

Aslanhane Mosque (Turkish: Arslanhane Camii) is a 13th-century mosque in Ankara, Turkey.

Location[edit]

The mosque is in the old quarter of Ankara next to Ankara Castle. With an altitude of 947 metres (3,107 ft) it overlooks Ankara at 39°56′12″N 32°51′55″E / 39.93667°N 32.86528°E / 39.93667; 32.86528.

History[edit]

The mosque is one of the oldest mosques in Turkey still standing. It was built during the reign of Mesud II of the Anatolian Seljuks in 1290. Its architect was Ebubekir Mehmet.[1] It was commissioned by two Ahi leaders named Hüsamettin and Hasaneddin. However, in 1330, it was repaired by another Ahi leader named Şerafettin after whom the mosque was named. After several minor repairs the mosque was restored by the Directorate General of Foundations in 2010-2013 term.

The building[edit]

The square-plan building with 400 square metres (4,300 sq ft) area has one minaret. Its wooden roof is supported by 24 large wood columns.[2] It has 3 gates and 12 windows[1] The mihrab is decorated with Seljuk tiles. The building material is mostly spolia from earlier buildings.

Şerafettin's tomb is facing the mosque. There was a lion statue which was buried in the walls of Şerafettin's mosque. That's why the popular name of the mosque is Aslanhane meaning the house of the lion.[3]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Aslanhane Ahi Şerafettin Camii, Tarihi Mekanlar ve Eserler" (in Turkish). filozof.net. Retrieved 2015-10-09.
  2. ^ "Museums in Ankara" (in Turkish). ankara.com. Retrieved 2015-10-09.
  3. ^ "Ankara Mosques in Turkey" (in Turkish). Mymerhaba.com. Retrieved 2015-10-09.