Audubon, New Jersey

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Audubon, New Jersey
Borough of Audubon
Audubon highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Audubon highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Audubon, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Audubon, New Jersey
Audubon is located in Camden County, New Jersey
Audubon
Audubon
Location in Camden County
Audubon is located in New Jersey
Audubon
Audubon
Location in New Jersey
Audubon is located in the United States
Audubon
Audubon
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 39°53′24″N 75°04′21″W / 39.890128°N 75.072382°W / 39.890128; -75.072382Coordinates: 39°53′24″N 75°04′21″W / 39.890128°N 75.072382°W / 39.890128; -75.072382[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyCamden
IncorporatedMarch 13, 1905
Named forJohn James Audubon
Government
 • TypeWalsh Act
 • BodyBoard of Commissioners
 • MayorRobert Jakubowski (term ends May 10, 2025)[3][4]
 • AdministratorDave Taraschi[3]
 • Municipal clerkBonnie Taft[3]
Area
 • Total1.50 sq mi (3.87 km2)
 • Land1.48 sq mi (3.84 km2)
 • Water0.01 sq mi (0.04 km2)  0.93%
 • Rank451st of 565 in state
24th of 37 in county[1]
Elevation56 ft (17 m)
Population
 • Total8,707
 • Estimate 
(2021)[8]
8,674
 • Rank260th of 566 in state
15th of 37 in county[9]
 • Density5,875.17/sq mi (2,268.17/km2)
  • Rank86th of 566 in state
7th of 37 in county[9]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area codes856 exchanges: 233, 337, 619, 916, 962[12]
FIPS code3400702200[1][13][14]
GNIS feature ID0885144[1][15]
Websitewww.audubonnj.com

Audubon is a borough in Camden County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2010 U.S. census, the borough's population was 8,819,[16][17][18] reflecting a decline of 363 (−4.0%) from the 9,182 counted in the 2000 census.[19]

History[edit]

The area that was to become Audubon was initially settled in the late 17th Century by various land owners and was primarily used for farms and mills. In 1695 the land now known as the Borough of Audubon was part of Newton Township. By the early 1700s, the area's first families were building their homesteads. Today, two of these original farmhouses remain in Audubon. The Low-Stokes-Nicholson house was built c. 1732 by John Low. Simon Breach built his home, known locally as "The Mansion House", in about 1740. A large addition was built by shipbuilder John Dialogue in c. 1853. Samuel Nicholson Rhodes, a local naturalist and author, owned this farm, which he named "Cedarcroft", from 1898–1912.[20] It was Mrs. Rhodes who came up with the name for the town. When the Atlantic City Railroad arrived in the 1880s the local farms were subdivided into the smaller communities of Audubon, Cedarcroft and Orston. Residential development began when both Audubon and Orston had train stations built in the 1890s.

On March 13, 1905, through an act of the New Jersey Legislature, Audubon was created as a borough from portions of Haddon Township. It was named for John James Audubon, the naturalist.[21] After a referendum on October 28, 1947, portions of Audubon were taken to form the borough of Audubon Park.[22]

Audubon is the home of three Medal of Honor recipients, the most awarded per capita of any town in the United States: Samuel M. Sampler (World War I), Edward Clyde Benfold (Korean War) and Nelson V. Brittin (Korean War). The three are honored by a memorial at Audubon High School.[23]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.50 square miles (3.87 km2), including 1.48 square miles (3.84 km2) of land and 0.01 square miles (0.04 km2) of water (0.93%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the borough include Orston.[24]

Audubon borders Audubon Park, Haddon Heights, Haddon Township, Haddonfield, Mount Ephraim and Oaklyn.[25][26][27]

Climate[edit]

The climate in the area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Audubon has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[28]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
19101,343
19204,740252.9%
19308,90487.8%
19408,9060.0%
19509,5317.0%
196010,4409.5%
197010,8023.5%
19809,533−11.7%
19909,205−3.4%
20009,183−0.2%
20108,819−4.0%
20208,707−1.3%
2021 (est.)8,674[8]−0.4%
Population sources:
1910–2000[29] 1910–1920[30]
1910[31] 1910–1930[32]
1930–1990[33] 2000[34][35]
2010[16][17][18] 2020[8]

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 8,819 people, 3,600 households, and 2,293 families in the borough. The population density was 5,925.7 per square mile (2,287.9/km2). There were 3,779 housing units at an average density of 2,539.2 per square mile (980.4/km2). The racial makeup was 95.23% (8,398) White, 1.44% (127) Black or African American, 0.14% (12) Native American, 1.13% (100) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.91% (80) from other races, and 1.15% (101) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.29% (290) of the population.[16]

Of the 3,600 households, 27.0% had children under the age of 18; 47.7% were married couples living together; 11.3% had a female householder with no husband present and 36.3% were non-families. Of all households, 30.1% were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.08.[16]

21.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.3% from 18 to 24, 27.2% from 25 to 44, 30.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.4 years. For every 100 females, the population had 94.3 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 91.9 males.[16]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $73,193 (with a margin of error of +/− $4,305) and the median family income was $89,399 (+/− $4,881). Males had a median income of $61,732 (+/− $4,152) versus $48,036 (+/− $4,880) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $34,243 (+/− $1,815). About 3.6% of families and 6.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.6% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.[36]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States census[13] there were 9,182 people, 3,673 households, and 2,387 families residing in the borough. The population density was 6,162.3 inhabitants per square mile (2,379.3/km2). There were 3,813 housing units at an average density of 2,559.0 per square mile (988.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.34% White, 1.51% Hispanic or Latino, 0.52% African American, 0.11% Native American, 0.89% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.48% from other races, and 0.64% from two or more races.[34][35]

There were 3,673 households, out of which 30.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.6% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.0% were non-families. 30.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.16.[34][35]

In the borough the population was spread out, with 24.8% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 31.0% from 25 to 44, 21.3% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.5 males.[34][35]

The median income for a household in the borough was $49,250, and the median income for a family was $59,115. Males had a median income of $45,650 versus $30,651 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,942. About 4.2% of families and 5.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.1% of those under age 18 and 8.4% of those age 65 or over.[34][35]

Government[edit]

Aerial view of Audubon

Local government[edit]

Audubon borough operates under the Walsh Act commission form of New Jersey municipal government. The borough is one of 30 municipalities (of the 564) statewide that use this commission form of government.[37] The governing body is comprised of three commissioners who are elected at-large on a non-partisan basis to serve four-year terms of office on a concurrent basis in elections held as part of the May municipal election. Each commissioner is assigned a specific department to head in addition to their legislative functions and the commissioners select one of their members to serve as mayor.[5]

As of 2022, the members of the Board of Commissioners are Mayor Robert Jakubowski (Director of Public Works, Parks and Buildings) Robert Lee (Director of Public Safety & Affairs) Jeffrey Whitman (Director of Revenue & Finance), all of whom are serving concurrent terms of office that end on May 10, 2025.[3][38]

Emergency services[edit]

The Audubon Police Department dates back to 1931, with Police Chief Frank Kelly chosen to lead the borough's first uniformed officers.[39] As of 2022, the department's chief is Thomas J. Tassi.[40]

The Audubon Fire Department is an all-volunteer unit with 50 members, responding to an average of 300 calls each year in Audubon and portions of surrounding communities, including Audubon Park, Haddon Heights, Mount Ephraim and Oaklyn.[41]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Audubon is located in the 1st Congressional district[42] and is part of New Jersey's 5th state legislative district.[17][43][44]

For the 118th United States Congress, New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Donald Norcross (D, Camden).[45][46] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[47] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[48][49]

For the 2022–2023 session, the 5th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Nilsa Cruz-Perez (D, Barrington) and in the General Assembly by Bill Moen (D, Camden) and William Spearman (D, Camden).[50]

Camden County is governed by a Board of County Commissioners comprised of seven members chosen at-large in partisan elections for three-year terms on a staggered basis by the residents of the county, with either two or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At a reorganization meeting held in January after each election, the newly constituted Board of Commissioners selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[51] As of 2022, Camden County's Commissioners are Commissioner Director Louis Cappelli Jr. (D, Collingswood, term as Commissioner ends December 31, 2023; term as Director ends 2022),[52] Commissioner Deputy Director Edward T. McDonnell (D, Pennsauken Township, term as Commissioner and as Deputy Director ends 2022),[53] Almar Dyer (D, Pennsauken Township, 2024),[54] Melinda Kane (D, Cherry Hill, 2024),[55] Jeffrey L. Nash (D, Winslow Township, 2024),[56] Carmen G. Rodriguez (D, Merchantville, 2022)[57] and Jonathan L. Young Sr. (D, Berlin Township, 2023)[58][51][59][60][61]

Camden County's constitutional officers, all elected directly by voters, are County Clerk Joseph Ripa (D, Voorhees Township, 2024),[62][63] Sheriff Gilbert "Whip" Wilson (D, Camden, 2024)[64][65] and Surrogate Michelle Gentek-Mayer (D, Gloucester Township, 2025).[66][67][68] The County Prosecutor is Grace C. MacAulay, who was sworn in on January 6, 2022.[69]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 6,215 registered voters in Audubon, of which 2,418 (38.9% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,113 (17.9% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 2,676 (43.1% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 8 voters registered as Libertarians or Greens.[70] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 70.5% (vs. 57.1% in Camden County) were registered to vote, including 89.4% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[70][71]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,718 votes (60.0% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 1,704 votes (37.6% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 70 votes (1.5% vs. 0.9%), among the 4,527 ballots cast by the borough's 6,618 registered voters, for a turnout of 68.4% (vs. 70.4% in Camden County).[72][73] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,806 votes (59.7% vs. 66.2% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 1,778 votes (37.8% vs. 30.7%) and other candidates with 81 votes (1.7% vs. 1.1%), among the 4,701 ballots cast by the borough's 6,423 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.2% (vs. 71.4% in Camden County).[74] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 2,696 votes (56.3% vs. 61.7% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 2,021 votes (42.2% vs. 36.4%) and other candidates with 40 votes (0.8% vs. 0.8%), among the 4,791 ballots cast by the borough's 6,091 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.7% (vs. 71.3% in the whole county).[75]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 62.0% of the vote (1,545 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 35.6% (886 votes), and other candidates with 2.4% (59 votes), among the 2,560 ballots cast by the borough's 6,650 registered voters (70 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 38.5%.[76][77] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 1,275 ballots cast (45.8% vs. 53.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 1,256 votes (45.1% vs. 38.5%), Independent Chris Daggett with 182 votes (6.5% vs. 4.5%) and other candidates with 47 votes (1.7% vs. 1.1%), among the 2,782 ballots cast by the borough's 6,221 registered voters, yielding a 44.7% turnout (vs. 40.8% in the county).[78]

Education[edit]

The Audubon School District serves public school students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade.[79] As of the 2020–21 school year, the district, comprised of three schools, had an enrollment of 1,463 students and 122.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.0:1.[80] Schools in the district (with 2020–21 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[81]) are Haviland Avenue School[82] with 254 students in grades PreK-2, Mansion Avenue School[83] with 372 students in grades 3-6 and Audubon High School[84] with 818 students in grades 7-12.[85][86][87]

Students from Audubon Park attend the district's schools as part of a sending/receiving relationship established after Audubon Park closed its lone school in 1979.[88] For grades 9–12, students from Mount Ephraim attend Audubon High School, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Mount Ephraim Public Schools.[89]

The two schools in Audubon, Haviland Avenue School and Mansion Avenue School had both served Kindergarten to sixth grade. This continued until the 2009–2010 school year when they were reconfigured so that Haviland is K–2 and Mansion serves grades 3–6.[90]

Students from Audubon, and from all of Camden County, are eligible to attend the Camden County Technical Schools, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at Gloucester Township Technical High School in Gloucester Township or Pennsauken Technical High School in Pennsauken Township.[91]

Transportation[edit]

U.S. Route 30 eastbound in Audubon

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 29.80 miles (47.96 km) of roadways, of which 22.16 miles (35.66 km) were maintained by the municipality, 6.44 miles (10.36 km) by Camden County and 1.20 miles (1.93 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[92]

U.S. Route 30 (White Horse Pike) traverses for 0.9 miles (1.4 km) across the borough, connecting Oaklyn and Haddon Heights.[93] Route 168 (Black Horse Pike) runs for 0.4 miles (0.64 km) from Mount Ephraim to Audubon Park, along the borough's border with Haddon Township.[94]

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit bus service is available in the borough on routes 400 (between Sicklerville and Philadelphia), 403 (between Turnersville and Camden), 450 (between the Cherry Hill Mall and Camden), and 457 (between the Moorestown Mall and Camden).[95][96]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Audubon include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
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  17. ^ a b c Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
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  79. ^ Audubon Board of Education District Policy - Identification, Audubon School District. Accessed December 16, 2022. "Purpose: The Board of Education exists for the purpose of providing a thorough and efficient system of free public education in grades Pre-Kindergarten through twelve in the Audubon School District. Composition: The Audubon School District is comprised of all the area within the municipal boundaries of Audubon."
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  83. ^ Mansion Avenue School, Audubon School District. Accessed December 16, 2022.
  84. ^ Audubon High School, Audubon School District. Accessed December 16, 2022.
  85. ^ Schools, Audubon School District. Accessed December 16, 2022.
  86. ^ School Performance Reports for the Audubon Public School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 16, 2022.
  87. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Audubon School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  88. ^ Atkins, Lissa D. "Audubon Park: No home ownership here", Courier-Post, October 19, 2006. Accessed December 11, 2014. "Audubon Park's only school is built. The school closed in 1979 because of declining enrollment; Audubon Park school children now attend schools in the Audubon School District."
  89. ^ Davy, Lucille E.Letter to Audubon Park School District, New Jersey Department of Education, June 30, 2009. Accessed December 11, 2014. "In addition to students from Audubon Park, Audubon also receives high school students from Mount Ephraim Public Schools."
  90. ^ Dengler, Julie. "Audubon BOE Budget Includes Restructuring", The Retrospect, March 7, 2008. Accessed March 4, 2015. "Under the proposal, Kindergarten through second graders would attend Haviland Ave. School while third through sixth graders would attend the Mansion Ave. School. The changes would eliminate a total of six elementary teaching jobs."
  91. ^ About Our Schools Archived 2011-09-12 at the Wayback Machine, Camden County Technical Schools. Accessed December 25, 2013.
  92. ^ Camden County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed December 25, 2013.
  93. ^ U.S. Route 130 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, April 2008. Accessed December 26, 2013.
  94. ^ Route 168 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, April 2009. Accessed December 26, 2013.
  95. ^ Camden County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 28, 2010. Accessed December 25, 2013.
  96. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide Archived 2018-09-29 at the Wayback Machine, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed December 25, 2013.
  97. ^ Staff. "A New Book Chronicles Audubon's Ties To Ship The Uss Benfold, Named For A Korean War Hero From Town, Enjoys A Special Relationship With Borough Residents.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, September 19, 1999. Accessed February 26, 2011. "It's not your typical exchange program. The citizens of Audubon and the USS Benfold, a guided-missile destroyer based in San Diego - and named after Audubon Korean War hero Edward C. Benfold - have a special relationship."
  98. ^ Staff. "Audubon war hero has ship named in his honor", Courier-Post, October 22, 2000. Accessed December 25, 2013. "The ship is named for Army Sgt. 1st Class Nelson Brittin, who was killed in the Korean War on March 7, 1951, during a heroic action under enemy fire."
  99. ^ Lawrence, Ryan. "Movie Magic: Mantua filmmaker gets horror movie vet to direct his script", Mantua News, September 25, 2020. Accessed January 26, 2022. "Born and bred in South Jersey, Cerrito grew up in Audubon and went to high school in Woodstown before settling in Mantua five years ago with his wife, Charmaine, and their now 4-year-old son, Mario Cerrito IV, and his 11-year-old stepdaughter, Summer Schaefer."
  100. ^ "Flacco anchors high-powered Blue Hens offense", Dan Wilson- An absolute savage. Courier-Post, November 4, 2007. Accessed November 29, 2007. "Joe Flacco just has a way about him.... That's why Flacco is so suited for the role of starting quarterback for the University of Delaware's football team. The former Audubon High School star is sure-handed, sure-footed and just gets it done on the football field, always has."
  101. ^ a b Narducci, Marc. "Son Delivers A Big-league Gift To Father Bill Laxton Of Audubon Learned His Son Was Promoted To The Oakland Athletics.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 21, 1999. Accessed October 10, 2015. "Laxton, a 1992 graduate of Audubon High School, was a starting pitcher in the minor leagues, but will work in long relief for the A's. 'It's the nicest Father's Day gift I've ever gotten,' his father said yesterday from his Audubon home.... If anybody knows that feeling, it's Bill Laxton. A 1966 graduate of Audubon, he spent parts of five major-league seasons as a pitcher for the Phillies, the San Diego Padres, and the Detroit Tigers."
  102. ^ "Author seeking Civil War data", The Home News, October 12, 1975. Accessed January 26, 2022, via Newspapers.com "Audubon - Author Edward G. Longacre, who is researching a history of the 12th N.J. Volunteer Infantry, 1862-65, i3 seeking wartime letters, diaries, memoirs and photographs."
  103. ^ Vic Obeck, Pro-Football-Reference.com. Accessed February 26, 2011.
  104. ^ Dean, Robert. Popularity Of Football Owes Much to Vic Obeck: McGill Coach Unofficial Ambassador of Good-Will for Fall Pastime, The Canadian Register, October 2, 1948. Accessed February 26, 2011. "When Vic was of high school age, his family moved to New Jersey, where he starred on the Audubon High School eleven, New Jersey high school champions."
  105. ^ Zimmer, Josh. "Meet the crossword mastermind", St. Petersburg Times, December 26, 2003. Accessed February 26, 2011. "Born in Audubon, N.J., Reagle wrote for game shows while living in Santa Monica, Calif."
  106. ^ Staff. "Parade in Audubon honors war hero", Courier-Post, April 18, 1999. Accessed December 24, 2013. "Army Cpl. Samuel M. Sampler, a Decatur, Texas, native who settled in Audubon after World War I."
  107. ^ Staff. "Sierra Club Luminary, Everest Trekker Dies At 85, A Passion For Defending Natural Resources Led Siri To Become A Top Advocate For Bay Area Preservation As 'Save The Bay' President", Contra Costa Times, September 5, 2004. Accessed December 25, 2013. "Born in Audubon NJ in 1919 Siri was educated at the University of Chicago and later helped design and build atomic bombs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee."
  108. ^ Naedele, Walter F. "Anne Volp, field hockey star", The Philadelphia Inquirer, May 30, 2010. Accessed January 16, 2021. "Born in Audubon, Camden County, Mrs. Volp was a 1939 graduate of Audubon High School, where she was on the basketball, softball, tennis, and swimming teams. She played field hockey well enough to be on the all-South Jersey team for two years."
  109. ^ "John L. (Jack) White Obituary", Courier-Post, October 10, 2001. Accessed August 30, 2017. "Born and raised in Audubon graduate of Audubon H.S. in 1948."

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