Big Apple Comic Con

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Big Apple Comic Con
Big Apple Comic Con Logo.jpg
StatusActive
GenreComics
Popular culture
VenueNew Yorker Hotel (2019-present)
Penn Plaza Pavilion (2004–2019)
Metropolitan Pavilion (2000–2003)
St. Paul the Apostle Church (1996–2003)
Location(s)New York City, New York
CountryUnited States
InauguratedMarch 2, 1996
Most recentMarch 26, 2022
Attendance10,000 (2018)[1]
Organized byMichael "Carbo" Carbonaro (1996–2009, 2014-present)
Wizard Entertainment (2009–2013)
WebsiteOfficial website

The Big Apple Comic Con is a New York City comic book convention, the longest-running comic book/speculative fiction/pop culture convention in New York City. It was started by retailer Michael "Mike Carbo" Carbonaro in March 1996 in the basement of the St. Paul the Apostle Church.[2] During its heyday from 2001 to 2008, the Big Apple Comic Con often featured multiple shows per year, with a large three-day "national" convention held in November, usually held at the Penn Plaza Pavilion. The show was owned by Wizard Entertainment from 2009 to 2013, but was reacquired by Carbonaro in 2014.

Over the course of its history, the convention has been known as the Big Apple Convention, the Big Apple Comic Book Art, and Toy Show, and the Big Apple Comic Book, Art, Toy & Sci-Fi Expo; with the larger three-day November shows known as the National Comic Book, Art, Toy, and Sci-Fi Expo, the National Comic Book, Art, and Sci-Fi Expo, and the National Comic Book, Comic Art, and Fantasy Convention. In 2014, the name "Big Apple Convention" was revived by Carbonaro for its March 2015 show.

Though it primarily focuses on comic books, the convention features a large range of pop culture elements, such as books, cinema, science fiction/fantasy, television, animation, anime, manga, toys, horror, collectible card games, video games, webcomics, and fantasy novels. Along with panels, seminars, and workshops with comic book professionals, the Big Apple Comic Con often features previews of upcoming films, and such evening events as the costume contest overseen by "Captain Zorikh" Zorikh Lequidre.[3]

The convention regularly hosts hundreds of artists, exhibitors, and film and television personalities in a huge floorspace for exhibitors. The show includes autograph and photo op opportunities with all of the guests, as well as the Artists' Alley where comics artists can sign autographs and sell or do free sketches.

History[edit]

Antecedents[edit]

Major comic book conventions in New York City prior to the Big Apple Comic Con included Dave Kaler's Academy Con, which ran annually from 1965 to 1967; Phil Seuling's Comic Art Convention, which ran annually from 1968 to 1983 (Seuling died in 1984); and the large annual Creation conventions, usually taking place over the weekend following Thanksgiving from 1971 to 1987. (Creation sometimes put on as many as a half-dozen smaller New York City shows per year).[4] From 1993 to 1995, promoter Frederic Greenberg[5] began hosting Great Eastern Conventions shows annually at venues including the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. (Great Eastern also ran shows in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts.) Other companies, including Dynamic Forces, held New York City conventions, but all were on a smaller scale than the Seuling shows. Changes in the industry, popular culture, and the resurgent city itself since the troubled 1960s and '70s made large-scale comic-book conventions difficult to hold profitably. Jonah Weiland of ComicBookResources.com also noted that "... dealing with the various convention unions made it difficult for most groups to get a show off the ground."[6]

Birth of the show[edit]

On February 29, 1996, just two days before it was to start, Fred Greenberg cancelled[7] what had been advertised as a larger-than-usual Great Eastern show, scheduled for March 2–3 at the New York Coliseum, which the fan press had suggested[8] might herald a successor to the 1968–1983 Comic Art Convention.[9]

On the spur of the moment, comic book retailers Michael Carbonaro, Vince Gulla,[9] and Vincent Zurzuolo,[10] all of whom had planned to sell their wares at the Great Eastern show,[7] mounted a substitute convention in the basement of the Church of St. Paul the Apostle.[10] The gathering — dubbed "ChurchCon,"[7] "Hallelujah Con," or "The Show Must Go On"[11] Con — attracted over 4,000 attendees, most of whom had been planning to attend the scheduled Great Eastern Show.[8] Thus was born the Big Apple Comic Con,[7] thereafter produced exclusively by Carbnonaro.[9]

Growth[edit]

After the success of the initial 1996 show, Big Apple scheduled six separate conventions in 1997.[12]

In 1998, Big Apple held three conventions, in March, April, and October.[citation needed]

In November 1999, (after a typical March show held at the Church of St. Paul the Apostle), Big Apple inaugurated the three-day "National Expo",[13] held at the Metropolitan Pavilion on West 18th Street in Manhattan.[14] The National Expo brought "together the National Comic Book, Comic Art and Fantasy Convention and the New York Toy, Sci-Fi and Collectible Show;"[15] the larger annual National shows were held every year from 1999 until 2008; other shows (until 2004) continued to be held at the Church of St. Paul the Apostle.

Over the years, the Big Apple con attracted many comics creators and pop culture figures.[2]

Heyday[edit]

Big Apple Comic Con Artist Alley 2008
Tom Noonan at the Big Apple Comic Con, October 17, 2009

By 2004 (which saw four separate shows), the convention had moved to the Penn Plaza Pavilion at the Hotel Pennsylvania.[16][17][18]

Big Apple Comic Con was characterized as being in "growth mode" in 2005–2006, with five shows per year[19] and an average attendance of about 8,000 guests per show.[20]

Acquisition by Wizard Entertainment[edit]

In 2009, the Big Apple Comic Con was purchased by Gareb Shamus of Wizard Entertainment; Michael Carbonaro was retained as a senior adviser.[21] The first show under Wizard was held October 2009 at Pier 94 in Manhattan.[22][23]

The acquisition of Big Apple was part of a concerted push by Wizard's CEO Gareb Shamus to dominate the North American convention circuit, including acquiring the Paradise Comics Toronto Comicon.[24][25] As part of that strategy, Wizard initially scheduled the 2010 Big Apple Comic Con for October 7–10, the exact same dates as the previously scheduled 2010 New York Comic Con, run by Reed Exhibitions.[26][27] After a public outcry, Wizard later moved the dates of its 2010 New York convention to October 1–3.[28]

Wizard held a new "Wizard World New York City Experience" show on June 28–30, 2013.[29]

New York Comic Book Marketplace[edit]

In 2009, Michael Carbonaro established his own independent one-day convention known as the New York Comic Book Marketplace which ran annually through 2014.[10]

Though not branded as a "Big Apple Convention" and not affiliated with Wizard World, some might consider the next iteration of the Big Apple Comic Con to have been held on March 31, 2012, at the Penn Plaza Pavilion. It was Michael Carbonaro's third New York Comic Book Marketplace, and (prematurely) announced as Carbonaro's final convention.[10][30] The guest of honor was Stan Lee; other guests included George Pérez, Joe Sinnott, Dick Ayers, Carmine Infantino, Jim Steranko, Irwin Hasen, Mike Royer, Arthur Suydam, Bob McLeod, Rich Buckler, and Johnny Brennan, and Captain Zorikh's costume contest.[31]

Carbonaro held another NYCBM at the Hotel Pennsylvania on April 13, 2013.[32]

Reacquisition by Mike Carbonaro[edit]

Carbonaro reacquired the convention from Wizard in 2014. (By 2017, New York Comic Con, held annually at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, had grown to rival that of San Diego Comic-Con, making it the dominant New York City-area comic convention.)[33] The December 2015 edition of Carbonaro's convention, titled the New York Winter Comic & Sci-Fi Expo, was held at the Resorts World Casino New York in Jamaica, New York, and was co-produced by Carbonaro and Frank Patz.[34]

With the holiday-themed December 2019 iteration of the show, the Big Apple Comic Con moved locations to the New Yorker Hotel.[2][35] The 2020 show, scheduled for April 4–5, was canceled due to the COVID-19 Pandemic.[36] The 2021 show, held September 25–26, was the Big Apple Comic Con's Silver Anniversary show; it was also the first in-person comics convention held in New York City since the pandemic.[37][38]

In 2022, Carbonaro hosted another iteration of the Big Apple Comic Con (on March 26, 2022); he also hosted (along with promoter Laz Rivero) the first Big Apple Trading Card Show, held on January 29, 2022, at the New Yorker Hotel. The trading card show featured baseball, football, basketball, Pokémon, Magic: The Gathering cards, and more.[39]

Criticism[edit]

Comics creator Evan Dorkin was a critic of the Big Apple Con.[14] He singled out the November 2008 show in particular as "the worst convention I've ever had the displeasure to sit through", for the lackluster celebrity guests, the lack of floor plan guides for attendees, inconsistently-functioning restrooms, elevator, and escalators, the poorly performing volunteer staff, and an overall seedy, flea market atmosphere of rude dealers, creators inattentive to fans, and attendees who were disproportionately male. Dorkin, who vowed never to return to the venue, also singled out the cramped space of the venue, in particular Artist's Alley, which he speculated may have constituted a fire hazard.[40]

Similarly, journalist Heidi MacDonald criticized the Penn Plaza Pavilion location as "eight pounds of sh-t in a five-pound bag." Journalist Rich Johnston said the conventions held there were "a little cramped and hot, but I still thoroughly enjoyed [them]."[2]

Dates and locations[edit]

Year Dates Venue Show Moniker Official guests Notes Source(s)
1996 March 2 St. Paul the Apostle Church ChurchCon; Show Must Go On Con; Hallelujah Con [2][11][37]
1997 January St. Paul the Apostle Church Big Apple Comic Con [12]
March St. Paul the Apostle Church Big Apple Comic Con [12][41]
May St. Paul the Apostle Church Big Apple Comic Con [12]
July St. Paul the Apostle Church Big Apple Comic Con [12]
September St. Paul the Apostle Church Big Apple Comic Con [12]
November St. Paul the Apostle Church Big Apple Comic Con [12]
1998 March St. Paul the Apostle Church Big Apple Comic Con James Warren [42]
April 4 St. Paul the Apostle Church Big Apple Comic Book & Toy Convention Al Williamson, Miran Kim 100 dealers; admission price $5 [43]
October 10
1999
November 12–14 Metropolitan Pavilion National Comic Book, Art, Toy, and Fantasy Convention First "National Expo"; large animation auction held Nov. 12 to benefit the American Foundation for the Visual Arts [13][44][45]
2000 March
November 10–12 Metropolitan Pavilion National Comic Book, Comic Art and Fantasy Convention James Doohan, Jerome Blake, Ron Palillo, Apollo Smile, Richard Herd, Pamelyn Ferdin, Carmine Infantino, Jeff Jones, Erik Larsen, Russ Heath, Dick Giordano, Joe Simon, Julie Schwartz, Joe Giella, Frank McLaughlin, Michael Kaluta, Dave Cockrum, Paty Cockrum, Irwin Hasen, Glenn Fabry, John Romita Sr., Jimmy Palmiotti, Amanda Conner, Arnold Drake, Murphy Anderson, Gray Morrow, Mike Esposito, Tom Gill, Andrew Pepoy, Amanda Conner, Jimmy Palmiotti, Mark Texeira, David Wohl, Joseph Michael Linsner, William Tucci, Janet Lupo, Kevin Eastman, Sarah Dyer, Evan Dorkin, Don McGregor, Jim Shooter, Dan DeCarlo, George Tuska, Gill Fox, George Tuska, Graig Weich, Mercy Van Vlack, Ken Gale, Tim Vigil, David Quinn [46]
2001 January 20
March 9–10 St. Paul the Apostle Church Auditorium Big Apple Comic Book, Art & Toy Show [47]
July 6–7 Big Apple Comic Book, Art & Toy Show [48]
September 14–15 St. Paul the Apostle Church Auditorium Big Apple Comic Book, Art & Toy Show Jeremy Bulloch, Ed Kemmer, Steve Rude, David W. Mack, Brian Michael Bendis, Joe Gill, Will Franz Postponed due to September 11 attacks [49]
October 12–13 St. Paul the Apostle Church Auditorium Run as a charity to benefit victims of the September 11 attacks [50]
November 9–11 Metropolitan Pavilion National Comic Book, Art, Toy, and Sci-Fi Expo Klaus Janson, Joe Staton, Trina Robbins, Jim Steranko, Jeff Smith, Jim Warren, Flo Steinberg, Herb Trimpe, Linda Fite, Walter Simonson, Louise Simonson, Tim Vigil Proceeds donated to the World Trade Center Fund. [51][52]
2002 January 19 Guy Gilchrist, Ethan Van Sciver, Bill Plympton, Irwin Hasen, Dick Ayers, The Iron Sheik, April Hunter, Wagner Brown, Tammy Lynn Sytch, Chris Candido, Virgil[citation needed]
July 12–13
September 13–14 Big Apple Comic Book Art and Toy Show
November 8–10 Metropolitan Pavilion National Comic Book, Comic Art, and Fantasy Convention Nichelle Nichols, Sarah Douglas, Sergio Aragonés, Jim Lee, Gene Colan, Nutopia, Sam Kieth, Michael Kaluta, Brian Michael Bendis, David W. Mack, Joe Jusko, Andy Lee, Tim Vigil, Graig F. Weich First annual Golden Panel Awards for Excellence in Comic Book Art and Story Telling (sponsored by the New York City Comic Book Museum); close to 6,000 attendees [7][15][53]
2003 January 25
April 6
May 2–3 St. Paul the Apostle Church Auditorium Big Apple Comic Book Art, and Toy Show Jim Steranko (guest of honor), Russ Heath, Billy Tucci, Graig Weich, Tony Isabella, Guy Gilchrist, Jim Krueger, Jamal Igle, Robin Riggs, Jim Salicrup [54]
July 25–26
September 5–6
November 28–30 Metropolitan Pavilion National Comic Book, Comic Art, and Fantasy Convention [55]
2004
November 19–21 Penn Plaza Pavilion National Comic Book, Comic Art, and Fantasy Convention Jim Starlin, Neal Adams, Adam Hughes, Bill Sienkiewicz, Jim Krueger, Roy Thomas, Jim Shooter, Michael Kaluta, Joseph Michael Linsner, Jim Califiore, Ramona Fradon, Michael Avon Oeming, Tom Raney, Rick Leonardi, Howard Chaykin, Tom Palmer, Anthony Schiavino, Joe Staton, Dave Roman, John Green, Andy McDonald, Ivan Brandon, Peter Kuper, Seth Tobocman, Robin Riggs, Elayne Riggs, Neil Vokes, Bob Tinnell, Dave DeVries, John Workman, Rudy Nebres, Tommy Castillo, Irwin Hasen, Rich Buckler [16][56]
2005 January 22–23 Penn Plaza Pavilion Big Apple Comic Book, Art, and Toy Show Bill Sienkiewicz, Joe Simon, Carmine Infantino , Kevin Eastman, Simon Bisley, Larry Lieber, Terry Dodson, Aaron Lopresti, Michael Lark, Billy Tucci, J. G. Jones, Dean Haspiel, Mike Bair Sunday art auction to benefit the American Red Cross [57]
April 1–3 Penn Plaza Pavilion Big Apple Comic Book, Art, and Toy Show Maureen Shea [58]
June 18–19 Penn Plaza Pavilion Big Apple Comic Book, Art, and Toy Show Fred Hembeck [59]
September 10–11 Penn Plaza Pavilion The Big Apple Con: Comic Book, Art and Toy Show Focus on American war comics. 12,000 attendees; 300 exhibitors. [60]
November 18–20 Penn Plaza Pavilion National Comic Book, Comic Art, and Fantasy Convention Richard Hatch 10th annual National show [61]
2006 "One-Day Wonder"
February 24–26 UDON artist collective, including Alvin Lee and Jim Zub [62]
March 31–April 2 Penn Plaza Pavilion Big Apple Comic Book, Art, and Toy Show Margot Kidder [63]
November 17–19 Penn Plaza Pavilion Big Apple National Comic Book Convention Roger Hill, Catherine Bach [64][65]
2007 January 19–20 Penn Plaza Pavilion Big Apple Comic Book, Art & Toy Expo Fan Appreciation show with free admission to celebrate Big Apple's 10th anniversary [66]
November 16–18 Penn Plaza Pavilion National Comic Book, Art, Toy & Sci-Fi Expo [67][68][69]
2008 June 7–8 Penn Plaza Pavilion Big Apple Comic Book, Art & Toy Expo Richard Dreyfuss, Malcolm McDowell, Ice-T, Coco Austin, Doug Jones, Jason Mewes, Dana Kimmel, Paul Kratka, Larry Zerner, David Katims, Catherine Parks, Tracie Savage, Annie Gaybis, Tony Moran, Warrington Gillette, Kathryn Leigh Scott, Jasmin St. Claire, Monique Dupree, David Zen Mansley, Adrian Barrios, Alex Maleev, Andy MacDonald, Anthony Cacioppo, Arthur Suydam, Bernie Wrightson, William Tucci, Brian C. Kong, Buzz, Danny Fingeroth, Ed Coutts, Gene Ha, Guy Dorian, Guy Gilchrist, Ian Dorian, Irwin Hasen, Ivan Brandon, Joe Giella, John Cebollero, Marcus Boas, Mark Sable, Mark Texeira, Michael Avon Oeming, Mike Lilly, Patrick Gleeson, Paul Azaceta, Primo, Rich Buckler, Richard Howell, Rob Granito, Rodney Ramos, Steve Mannion, Steve Walker, Taki Soma, Tommy Castillo "Summer Sizzler" [17][70]
November 14–16 Penn Plaza Pavilion National Big Apple Comic Book, Art, Toy, & Sci-Fi Expo Comics guests: Neal Adams, Brian Michael Bendis, Ivan Brandon, Rich Buckler, Evan Dorkin, Mark Evanier, Danny Fingeroth, Joe Giella, Basil Gogos, Michael Golden, Gene Ha, Irwin Hasen, Carmine Infantino, Alex Maleev, Michael Avon Oeming, Robin Riggs, John Romita, Jr., Walt Simonson, Jim Steranko, Bryan Talbot, Mark Texeira, William Tucci, Bernie Wrightson; celebrity guests: George Lazenby, Peter Mayhew, Kate Mulgrew [71][14][18]
2009
October 16–18 Pier 94 Wizard World Big Apple Comic Con Jim Lee (co-Guest of Honor), Joe Quesada (co-Guest of Honor), Tom Noonan, Dan Parent; celebrity guest: William Shatner First iteration of the show under Wizard Entertainment [21][22][72][73][74][75]
2010 February 27 Penn Plaza Pavilion New York Comic Book Marketplace Herb Trimpe, Michael Golden, Tony Robinson, Irwin Hasen, Mark Texeira, Gene Colan, J. H. Williams III, Dan Slott, Larry Hama, Billy Tucci, Bill Sienkiewicz, Chris Claremont, Cliff Chiang, Jim Starlin, Matt Clark, Sean Chen, Dick Ayers, Trevor Von Eeden, Mike Lilly, Brian Kong, Renée Witterstaetter, Janet Jackson, Stu Suchit, John Cebollero, Jorge Gonzalez, Bob Wiacek, Mark Romanoski, Scott Roberts, Danny Fingeroth, Rudy Nebres, Rodney Ramos, Steve Mannion, Ian Dorian, Guy Dorian, Khary Randolph Originally scheduled to be held at the 69th Regiment Armory [76]
October 1–3 Penn Plaza Pavilion Big Apple Comic Con Convention returns to the newly renovated Penn Plaza Pavilion [77]
2011 May 21–22 Penn Plaza Pavilion Wizard World Big Apple Comic Con Neal Adams, Nick Abadzis, Kaare Andrews, Matt Kindt, Percy Carey, Kevin Colden, Jared Fletcher, Michael Kupperman, Jason Little, Mark Morales, Laurie Sandell, Yuko Shimizu, Ronald Wimberly, Brian Wood, Arthur Suydam, Jerry Robinson, Luke Ross, Greg Horn, Christos Gage, Ryan Ottley, Alex Saviuk [78][79]
2012 March 31 Penn Plaza Pavilion New York Comic Book Marketplace Guest of honor: Stan Lee; other guests: George Pérez, Joe Sinnott, Dick Ayers, Carmine Infantino, Jim Steranko, Irwin Hasen, Mike Royer, Arthur Suydam, Bob McLeod, Rich Buckler, Johnny Brennan Third NYCBM, announced as Carbonaro's final convention; Captain Zorikh's costume contest [31]
2013 April 13 Penn Plaza Pavilion New York Comic Book Marketplace Special guest: George Pérez [32][80]
June 28–30 Basketball City (Pier 36) Wizard World New York City Experience Julie Bell, Mike Deodato, Jr., Stan Lee, Carlos Pacheco, Humberto Ramos, Paolo Rivera, Arthur Suydam, Boris Vallejo Focused on "celebrities, creators, sports stars, music, exhibitors, parties and other attractions" — very little comics content [81][82]
2014
2015
December 5–6 Resorts World Casino New York New York Winter Comic & Sci-Fi Expo (a.k.a. New York Winter Con 2015) Comics guests: John Cassaday, Dave Dorman; celebrity guests: Jeremy Bulloch, Daniel Logan, Nichelle Nichols, Austin St. John, Michael Biehn, Mick Foley, King Kong Bundy, Tito Santana Co-produced by Frank Patz and Michael Carbonaro [34]
2016 March 5 Penn Plaza Pavilion Big Apple Con Neal Adams, Jason David Frank, Kathy Garver, Erik Larsen, Joseph Michael Linsner, James O'Barr, Karyn Parsons, Lori Petty, Laurence Mason, Johnny Brennan, Mark Texeira [83]
2017 March 11–12 Penn Plaza Pavilion Big Apple Comic Con Jim Lee, Neal Adams, Jon Bernthal, Guy Dorian, Jason David Frank, Kathy Garver, Michael Golden, Neil Kaplan, Frank Miller, Arthur Suydam, Mark Texeira, Billy Tucci, Spencer Wilding, Renée Witterstaetter Stan Lee cancelled scheduled appearance due to illness [84][85][86][87]
2018 April 14–15 Penn Plaza Pavilion Big Apple Comic Con Nicholas Brendon, Jennifer Cihi, Michael Copon, Peter David, Michael Golden, Toshio Maeda, Jim Steranko, Arthur Suydam, Billy Tucci, Renée Witterstaetter, John Cassaday, Joe Giella, Ramona Fradon, Mike Royer [1][3][88]
2019 March 9–10 Penn Plaza Pavilion Big Apple Comic Con Celebrity guests: William Shatner, Mike Colter, Kathleen Turner, Brent Spiner, Chris Rankin, John O'Hurley, Mary Wilson, David Gerrold, Ann Robinson, Jason Liles, Richard Dorton, Alan Maxson, T. J. Storm, Gigi Edgley, Geoffrey Cantor, Debbie Rochon, Dave Madison, The Amazing Kreskin. Comics guests: Frank Cho, Tony Isabella, Jim Steranko, Bill Griffith, Jae Lee, Diane Noomin, Arvell Jones, Mark Texeira, Dan Nokes, Larry Welz, Robert J. Sodaro, Peter Bagge, Joe Martino, Ramona Fradon, Reilly Brown, Adam Air Williams, Peter David, Sy Barry, John Orlando, Brian Kong, Bob Camp, J. David Spurlock, Timothy Truman, Larry Nemecek, Danny Fingeroth, James Sherman, Sean Chen, Jim Salicrup, Mike Diana, Cristian Aluas, Rodney Ramos, Keith Williams, Larry Stroman, Dan Fogel [89]
December 14 New Yorker Hotel Big Apple Comic Con Comics guests Jim Steranko, Paul Levitz, Neal Adams, Erica Schultz, Billy Tucci, Larry Hama, Joseph Michael Linsner, Mark Texeira, Tom DeFalco, Bob Rozakis, Paul Kupperberg, Michael Jan Friedman, Peter Kuper, Paris Cullins, Gary Cohn, Larry Stroman, Bob Wiacek, Mike Diana, Zorikh Lequidre, John Orlando, and the Kubert School; celebrity guests Sam J. Jones, Peter Scolari, Barbie Chula (Cosplay Guest of Honor) First Big Apple con at the New Yorker Hotel [2][35][38]
2020 April 4–5 New Yorker Hotel Big Apple Comic Con Cancelled due to COVID-19 pandemic [36]
2021 September 25–26 New Yorker Hotel Big Apple Comic Con Comics guests: Jim Starlin, Jim Steranko, Marat Mychaels, Billy Tucci, Amanda Conner, Jimmy Palmiotti, Keith Williams; celebrity guest: Jason David Frank Silver Anniversary show [37][38][90]
2022 March 26 New Yorker Hotel Big Apple Comic Con Comics guests: Esad Ribić, Michael E. Uslan, Jamal Igle, James Sherman, Erica Schultz, Khoi Pham; celebrity guests: Melissa Roxburgh, Shantel VanSanten, Cerina Vincent, Michelle Harrison, Maiara Walsh, Katie Barberi, Craig Hurley [91]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°45′02″N 73°59′34″W / 40.750634°N 73.992703°W / 40.750634; -73.992703