Davis Langdon

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Davis Langdon, An AECOM Company (also known as PCC in Europe and the Americas).
Industry Construction, consultancy, real estate
Founded 1919
Headquarters London, United Kingdom
Products Cost management; project and program management
Number of employees
2,500
Parent AECOM
Website www.davislangdon.com

Davis Langdon was a construction consultancy company originally founded in London in 1919,[1] which grew to approximately 2,500 employees working in over 18 countries worldwide. In October 2010, the company was acquired by AECOM, with its operations outside Australasia and Asia rebranded as AECOM in 2013.

Early history[edit]

Horace William Langdon established a quantity surveying practice in Holborn, London in 1919, and worked for a time in partnership (dissolved 1927) with a John Belmont Taylor.[2] In 1921 Cecil Tom Every joined Langdon's practice, and they formed Langdon & Every in 1928,[3] which expanded to operate in the Middle East, Australasia and Asia Pacific regions as well as in the UK. (Langdon was a local councillor and served as mayor of the Metropolitan Borough of Holborn (1935–1936); Every was Director of Post-War Building Programmes at the Ministry of Works, recognised with a CBE in the 1946 New Year Honours.)

In 1931, another quantity surveying practice was established by Owen Davis. Cambridge graduate and QS John Belfield joined Davis establishing a partnership, Davis & Belfield, in 1935. In 1944, they formed a new partnership with Bobbie Everest (a descendent of George Everest), becoming Davis, Belfield & Everest.

Langdon & Every merged with Davis Belfield & Everest in 1988 to become Davis Langdon & Everest,[4] and in 2004 Davis Langdon & Everest converted to a Limited Liability Partnership to become Davis Langdon LLP.[4]

AECOM era[edit]

In October 2010, the company became part of AECOM Technology Corporate[5] – a global provider of professional technical and management support services. From that date Davis Langdon became known globally as AECOM's Program, Cost, Consultancy team,[6] whilst presenting its services to the market as Davis Langdon, An AECOM Company.

On 1 October 2013, it rebranded as AECOM in Europe, the Middle East, Africa and the Americas.[7][8] In Australia and New Zealand however, the company continues to be known as Davis Langdon, An AECOM Company. Furthermore, in Asia, it is known as Davis Langdon KPK, An AECOM Company, which incorporates the name of KPK – an Asia-based company specialising in construction estimation and contract management consultancy that was acquired by AECOM in 2012.[9]

Services[edit]

The specific services offered globally by the company include cost consultancy, project management, CDM coordinator and health and safety services, management consulting, legal support, specification consulting, engineering services, fiscal incentives advice and facilities management. The company provides these services for clients investing in infrastructure, property and construction and has worked on a number of high-profile projects including the Olympic Park for the 2012 Summer Olympics in London; Tate Modern and the Eden Project in the United Kingdom; Estádio do Dragão in Portugal; Abu Dhabi International Airport; Grand Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Egypt; The Gateway Bridge Upgrade in Brisbane, Australia; the San Francisco Transbay Terminal, U.S.; the Gautrain Rapid Rail Link in Johannesburg, and Green Point, Cape Town – built for the 2010 FIFA World Cup – in Cape Town, South Africa.

List of notable projects[edit]

Projects worked on by Davis Langdon, An AECOM Company include:

Further reading[edit]

  • Meikle, Jim, Thinking Big: The History of Davis Langdon, Black Dog Publishing, 2009 ISBN 978-1-906155-71-1

References[edit]

  1. ^ "AECOM corporate website – History of Davis Langdon". AECOM. 2013. Archived from the original on 27 November 2013. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  2. ^ "Campshill House – Housing for the Victorian Elite & the Post War Working Classes". Running Past South East London History on Foot. Retrieved 2 April 2018. 
  3. ^ "London Gazette, 10 January 1928" (PDF). The London Gazette. Retrieved 2 April 2018. 
  4. ^ a b Meikle, Jim "Changes in UK construction professional services firms in the late 20th century" in Smyth, Hedley (2011). Managing the Professional Practice: In the Built Environment. John Wiley. ISBN 9781444392357. 
  5. ^ "AECOM corporate website – press release on Davis Langdon merger". AECOM. 2013. Archived from the original on 27 November 2013. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  6. ^ "AECOM corporate website – Program, Cost, Consultancy". AECOM. 2013. Archived from the original on 4 February 2015. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  7. ^ Gardiner, Joey (27 June 2013). "Goodbye Davis Langdon: Aecom to scrap historic brand". Building. Retrieved 3 April 2018. 
  8. ^ Fitzpatrick, Tom (26 September 2013). "Aecom: Life after Davis Langdon". Construction News. Retrieved 3 April 2018. 
  9. ^ "AECOM corporate website – press release on KPK merger". AECOM. 2013. Archived from the original on 27 November 2013. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 

External links[edit]