Gwere language

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Gwere
(O)lugwere
Native to Uganda
Native speakers
410,000 (2002 census)[1]
Language codes
ISO 639-3 gwr
Glottolog gwer1238[2]
JE.17[3]

Gwere, or Lugwere, is the language spoken by the Gwere people (Bagwere), a Bantu people found in the eastern part of Uganda. It has a close dialectical resemblance to Soga and Ganda, which neighbour the Gwere.

Gwere, though closest in dialect to its eastern neighbours, also has many words similar to those used by tribes from the western part of Uganda. For example, musaiza (a man) resembles mushiiza used by the western languages with the same meaning.

The Ruli, a somewhat distant people living in central Uganda, speak a language that has almost exactly the same words used in Lugwere, but with a very different pronunciation.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gwere at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "Gwere". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  3. ^ Jouni Filip Maho, 2009. New Updated Guthrie List Online
  • Akinlabi, Akinbiyi (1995). Theoretical approaches to African linguistics. Africa World Press. ISBN 0-86543-463-8. 

The members of the Basimba Leopard Clan with the names Katunku, Ngulya, Mwati, Ntembe, Namuyonjo, Kabolesa, Kaabya of Lupada Naboa Sub-County, budaka County, Budaka District are not Bagwere but live among the Bagwere and their clan is among the minority clans of Uganda with their origin traced back to Tanzania and Zambia. See references of books with information on them.

Customary Law of the Haya Tribe, Tanganyika Territory - Page 287 https://books.google.com/books?isbn=0714624764 Hans Cory, M. M. Hartnoll - 1945 - Preview - More editions For example, the omugurusi of the Basimba clan is Mauwe. On the day of his birth a dog had puppies. The dog of ten washed the child by licking it. Mauwe later, out of gratitude, ordered his descendants to consider the dog as their friend, and ...

Tanzania Notes and Records - Issues 42-45 - Page 54 https://books.google.com/books?id=xxIOAQAAMAAJ 1956 - Snippet view - More editions According to local tradition the original inhabitants were a clan called the Basimba who lived in the area of Busere on the south-east of the island, but it is not known what language they spoke and there are none of their descendants surviving ...

Tanganyika Notes and Records - Issues 38-50 - Page 167 https://books.google.com/books?id=rKsaAQAAMAAJ 1955 - Snippet view - More editions According to local tradition the original inhabitants were a clan called the Basimba who lived in the area of Busere on the south-east of the island, but it is not known what language they spoke and there are none of their descendants surviving ...

Origins of Kingship Traditions and Symbolism in the Great Lakes ... https://books.google.com/books?isbn=9155472958 Birgitta Farelius - 2008 - Snippet view - More editions Many clans still recount this etymological devise. Cory and Hartnoll note with surprise that although every clan has its totem in Buhaya (and Karagwe) and there are many clans, ... For example, the omugurusi of the basimba clan is Mauwe.

History of the Bukoba District - Page 101 https://books.google.com/books?id=PZcMAQAAIAAJ Hans Cory - 1959 - Snippet view Local tradition about the origin of this feature does not exist except that it goes back sometimes to the omuguruzi who adopted a secondary totem on account of certain events in his life. For instance; the secondary totem of the Basimba clan is ...