Libertarian Party of the District of Columbia

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Libertarian Party of the District of Columbia
Founded c. 1981[1][2]
(reorganized 2012)[3]
Headquarters 4410 Massachusetts Avenue NW,
Suite 181
Washington, DC 20016
Ideology Libertarianism
National affiliation Libertarian Party
Colors blue, yellow
Website
dclibertarians.org

The Libertarian Party of the District of Columbia is a political party in the United States active in Washington, DC.[4][5] It is the recognized affiliate of the national Libertarian Party.

The Libertarian Party of the District of Columbia is dedicated to the same ideas represented by the national Libertarian Party but also focuses on issues specific to the District of Columbia such as "taxation without representation", home rule, and statehood.

History[edit]

The Libertarian Party of the District of Columbia has existed since at least 1981.[1][2]

1986 election cycle[edit]

Scott Kohlhaas was the Libertarian Party candidate for an at-large seat on the Council of the District of Columbia in 1986.[6]

Kohlhaas came in fourth place with 2,261 votes, or one percent of the total vote.[7]

1988 election cycle[edit]

Dennis Sobin was the Libertarian Party candidate for an at-large seat on the Council of the District of Columbia in 1988.[8] Sobin was an entrepreneur who published an adult magazine, an escort service, telephone party lines, and video stores.[9] He campaigned to decriminalize prostitution and drugs.[9] He said that drug addition should be treated as a medical disease rather than as a crime.[9] Sobin opposed a proposed law that would have prohibited minors from being inside certain clubs in late hours.[10]

Prissy Williams-Godfrey was the Libertarian Party candidate for the Ward 2 seat on the Council.[11] Williams-Godfrey was a prostitute and managed a brothel. Police arrested her, saying her campaign offices were actually brothels.[12] Her name did not appear on general election ballots.[13]

Sobin came in seventh place with 3,419 votes, or one percent of the total votes.[13]

1990 election cycle[edit]

Nancy Lord ran for Mayor of the District of Columbia as a Libertarian in 1990.[14] Lord campaigned promising a ten-percent decrease in the number of employees of the Government of the District of Columbia.[14] She wanted to end welfare payments within two years and she wanted to end rent control laws.[15] and end rent control laws.[16] She promised to end government regulations that she said strangle small businesses,[14] such as the Boxing Commission and most of the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs.[17] Lord advocated for increasing property taxes on undeveloped parcels of land, and

Jacques Chevalier filed to run for chair of the District Council as a Libertarian,[18] but he was not successful at securing a place on the general election ballot.[19]

Lord came in third place with 951 votes, or one percent of the vote.[19]

1994 election cycle[edit]

David W. Morris was elected Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner for Single Member District 2F04.[20] Morris also served as the treasurer of the Libertarian Party of the District of Columbia.[20]

2000 election cycle[edit]

Robert D. Kampia ran as the Libertarian Party candidate for Delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives.[21] Kampia received a bachelor's degree in engineering science from Pennsylvania State University.[22] He was the founder and executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project.[22] Kampia campaigned to end the arrest of nonviolent drug users.[22] He said the District's biggest problem was that half of black males ages 18 to 35 are incarcerated, on parole, or on probation because anti-drug legislation has displayed a racial bias.[22] Kampia advocated for the District's full representation in the United States Congress.[22] He said that District residents should be exempt from all federal taxes until the District receives full representation in Congress.[22]

Matthew G. Mercurio ran as the Libertarian Party candidate for an at-large seat on the Council in 2000.[23] Mercurio earned a bachelor's degree in economics and mathematics from Boston University and a master's degree and doctorate in economics from Princeton University, and he worked as a consulting economist.[24] Mercurio campaigned to legalize medical marijuana use by people who are seriously ill.[24]

Kampia came in third place, receiving 4,594 votes or three percent of the total vote.[25]

Mercurio came in sixth place, receiving 5,771 votes, or two percent of the total vote.[25]

2008 election cycle[edit]

Damien Lincoln Ober ran as the Libertarian Party candidate for the District's shadow senator in 2008.[26] Ober worked a bartender, and he was also a writer and a filmmaker.[27]

When The Washington Post asked Ober about the most urgent issue facing the District, Ober said that Arlington and Alexandria should be returned to the District of Columbia, describing the retroceded land as the District's "phantom limb".[28] When The Washington Post asked why voters should elect him, Ober said, "Anyone who can answer this in 25 words is surely using market-tested phrases in place of true discourse or new ideas about government and advocacy."[28]

Ober came in fourth place with 5,915 votes or three percent of the total vote.[29]

2012 election cycle[edit]

In 2012, Bruce Majors ran as the Libertarian Party candidate for the Congressional delegate for the District of Columbia.[30] A resident of the West End, Majors received a bachelor's degrees in philosophy and political science from American University and the University of Chicago and a master of business administration from Georgetown University.[30] A real estate agent,[31] Majors had lived in the District since 1980.[32]

In 2010, Majors told a reporter from The Washington Post that he was comfortable working with people who support the Tea Party movement because they have common goals with libertarians.[33] On his blog, Majors posted advice to attendees of the 2010 Restoring Honor rally that attendees should avoid two Metrorail lines because they go through certain neighborhoods. He wrote that many parts of the District are safe, "but why chance it if you don't know where you are?"[32]

During his 2012 campaign, Majors told a reporter from The Washington Post that he expected to lose.[34] He said his goal was to receive at least 7,500 votes in order to secure major-party status for the Libertarian Party and make it far easier for its candidates to appear on the ballot.[34]

Majors said the most urgent problems facing the voters was lack of full representation in Congress, failing schools, failing power lines, governmental corruption, and governmental spending.[30]

Majors came in second place with 16,524 votes, or six percent of the total vote.[35] Because he ran as a Libertarian Party candidate and he received more than 7,500 votes, the Libertarian Party became a major party in the District through at least 2016.[36]

2014 election cycle[edit]

Bruce Majors ran as the Libertarian Party candidate for mayor of the District.[37] In the general election, Majors came in fifth place with 1,297 votes, or one percent of the total vote.[37]

Kyle Walker was the Libertarian Party candidate for chair of the Council.[38] Walker came in fifth place with 3,674 votes, or two percent of the total vote.[37]

Frederick Steiner was the Libertarian Party candidate for at-large member of the Council.[39] A resident of Fort Totten, Steiner worked in information technology.[40] Steiner came in fourteenth place with 3,766 votes, or one percent of the total vote.[37]

John Vaught LaBeaume ran as the Libertarian Party candidate to represent Ward 1 on the Council.[39] LaBeaume worked as the director of communications for Robert Sarvis, Libertarian candidate for Governor of Virginia.[40] LaBeaume had also written and edited online content for the Washington Examiner.[40] He came third place with 829 votes, or four percent of the total vote.[37]

Ryan Sabot was the Libertarian Party candidate to represent Ward 3 on the Council.[39] Sabot came in second place with 2,940 votes, or eleven percent of the vote.[37]

Preston Cornish ran for the Ward 5 seat on the Council as a Libertarian.[40] Born in the District and raised in Rockville, Maryland, he graduated from Furman University.[41] A resident of Eckington, Cornish worked for Reason Foundation.[41] Cornish campaigned to legalize marijuana and decriminalize other "low-risk" drugs.[40] He wanted to restore ethical behavior on the District Council, and he favored developing the ward's land for residential and retail uses instead of industrial uses.[40] Cornish came in second place and received 1,488 votes, or six percent of the total vote.[37]

Libertarian Party member William Hanff ran as a write-in candidate in the general election for the Ward 5 seat on the Council.[42] Hanff was an assistant professor of mass media at the University of the District of Columbia.[43] In the general election, there were 199 votes for write-in candidates, or one percent of the total; the District of Columbia Board of Elections did not report how many of those votes were for Hanff.[37]

Pranav Badhwar ran for the Ward 6 seat on the Council.[40] A resident of Capitol Hill,[44] Badhwar is originally from India, and he has also lived in Toronto and New York City before moving to the District in 2000.[45] His campaign focused on job creation and the reducing business regulations in the District.[45] He opposed increasing the District's minimum wage, saying that doing so would be detrimental to small businesses.[45] He favored giving schools more autonomy to do as they see fit.[45] In the general election, he came in second place, receiving 3,127 votes, ten percent of the total vote.[37]

Sara Jane Panfil announced she would run for Libertarian Party candidate for Delegate to the United States House of Representatives.[39] Although Panfil won the Libertarian Party primary election,[46] she did not appear on the general election ballot.[47]

John Daniel ran for shadow senator as the Libertarian Party candidate.[39] Daniel was an entrepreneur.[48] Daniel came in fourth place with 7,826 votes, four percent of the total vote.[37]

Martin Moulton was the Libertarian Party candidate for shadow representative.[39][49] Originally from the San Francisco Bay Area,[50] Moulton was a resident of Shaw.[51] Moulton worked in the technology industry,[52] and he served as the president of the Convention Center Community Association.[53] He came in third place with 11,002 votes, or six percent of the total vote.[37]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Richburg, Keith B. (July 8, 1981). "Coalition Fights Educational Tax Credit Initiative: Educational Tax Credits Opposed by City Coalition". The Washington Post. p. B1. 
  2. ^ a b Majors, Bruce H. (June 20, 1981). "Mayor Barry and Tuition Tax Credits" (letter to the editor). The Washington Post. p. A12. 
  3. ^ "About Us". DC Libertarian Party. Retrieved October 30, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Gary Johnson D.C. Presidential Vote: Libertarian Candidate Seeks To Upset Mitt Romney". The Huffington Post. November 6, 2012. Retrieved November 29, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Political Parties in the District of Columbia (D.C), United States of America (U.S.A.)". Mondo Politico. Retrieved November 29, 2013. 
  6. ^ Bruske, Ed (October 24, 1986). "Ward 5 Race Becomes Hottest of 7 Contests for D.C. Council". The Washington Post. p. C5. 
  7. ^ "The 1986 Elections: Maryland, District and Virginia Results". The Washington Post. November 5, 1986. p. A44. 
  8. ^ Bruske, Ed (September 29, 1988). "Residency of Candidate Sobin Disputed by D.C. Landlord". The Washington Post. p. D5. 
  9. ^ a b c Bruske, Ed (October 20, 1988). "Sobin Enjoys 'Notoriety' Of Running for Office: Dennis Sobin". The Washington Post. p. DC1. 
  10. ^ Knight, Athelia (October 27, 1988). "Candidates Field Questions at Georgetown Forum". The Washington Post. p. A13. 
  11. ^ "D.C. Independent, Minor Party Candidates File for Election". The Washington Post. September 1, 1988. p. A19. 
  12. ^ Bruske, Ed (Jan 18, 1989). "Prostitute Bounced From ANC Panel: After Winning 36 Write-In Votes, Madam's Residence Is Challenged". The Washington Post. p. B3. 
  13. ^ a b "District of Columbia Results". The Washington Post. Nov 10, 1988. p. D10. 
  14. ^ a b c Abramowitz, Michael (May 31, 1990). "D.C.'s Political Edge: Libertarian Wants to Legalize Drugs, Slash Bureaucracy". The Washington Post. p. J1. 
  15. ^ Abramowitz, Michael (November 1, 1990). "A Refreshing Change". The Washington Post. p. DC3. 
  16. ^ Abramowitz, Michael (November 1, 1990). "AS Refreshing Change". The Washington Post. p. DC3. 
  17. ^ "District of Columbia Voters' Guide". The Washington Post. November 1, 1990. p. VGD2. 
  18. ^ McCall, Nathan (Mar 18, 1990). "D.C. Elections Certain To Shake Up Council: Leadership, Balance of Power Likely to Shift". The Washington Post. p. C1. 
  19. ^ a b "Election 1990: District of Columbia Results". The Washington Post. November 8, 1990. p. D10. 
  20. ^ a b "Around the District: ANC Elects Chairman". The Washington Post. January 18, 1996. p. J3. 
  21. ^ Fehr, Stephen C. (October 31, 2000). "Norton Faces Eclectic Group of Opponents". The Washington Post. p. B7. 
  22. ^ a b c d e f "Delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives". The Washington Post. October 26, 2000. p. J21. 
  23. ^ Sewell, Chan (October 16, 2000). "D.C. Challengers Struggle to Turn Residents' Heads" City's Improvement Has Helped Temper Voters' Desire for Change on Council". The Washington Post. p. B3. 
  24. ^ a b "Council: At Large". The Washington Post. October 26, 2000. p. J21. 
  25. ^ a b "Final and Complete Election Results for the November 7, 2000 General Election". District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics. November 17, 2000. 
  26. ^ Birnbaum, Michael (September 4, 2008). "More Choices for Voters in November: Third-Party, Unaffiliated Candidates on Ballot". The Washington Post. p. T3. 
  27. ^ Harris, Hamil R. (November 1, 2008). "Challengers, Charges Keep Incumbent's Hands Full". The Washington Post. p. B3. 
  28. ^ a b "Damien Lincoln Ober". The Washington Post. October 30, 2008. p. T11. 
  29. ^ "Certified Results, General Election 2008". District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics. November 24, 2008. 
  30. ^ a b c "Delegate to U.S. House of Representatives". The Washington Post. November 1, 2012. p. T18. 
  31. ^ Rafter, Dan (May 31, 2003). "The Same, but Better: To Sell a Cookie-Cutter House, Concentrate on Price and Presentation". The Washington Post. p. F1. 
  32. ^ a b Zongker, Brett; Syeed, Nafeesa (September 1, 2010). "Sharpton: Beck Rally Goes against King's Vision". Chicago Citizen (Chicago, Illinois). p. 14. 
  33. ^ "Obama Builds a Big Tent ... for Conservatives". Wall Street Journal. August 30, 2010. 
  34. ^ a b Reilly, Corinne (October 3, 2012). "Mr. Smith rarely goes to Washington". The Washington Post. p. A1. 
  35. ^ "Certified Results, General Election, November 6, 2012". District of Columbia Board of Elections. April 14, 2014. 
  36. ^ DeBonis, Mike (November 11, 2012). "Libertarians' vote total wins party access to D.C. ballot". The Washington Post. 
  37. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "General Election Unofficial Results". District of Columbia Board of Elections. November 14, 2014. Retrieved November 16, 2014. 
  38. ^ DeBonis, Mike (October 21, 2014). "Early voting begins in D.C. for mayor, attorney general, council races". The Washington Post. 
  39. ^ a b c d e f Wright, James (April 3, 2014). "Allen, Nadeau Set for Council Seats". Washington Informer. p. 12-13. 
  40. ^ a b c d e f g "DC Voter's Guide 2014". WUSA-TV. November 3, 2014. 
  41. ^ a b McNeir, D. Kevin (October 23, 2014). "Early Voting Begins in District: Council, School Board, Attorney General Up for Grabs". Washington Informer. p. V27-V28. 
  42. ^ "William Hanff". Libertarian Party. Archived from the original on February 20, 2014. Retrieved February 16, 2014. 
  43. ^ "Faculty and Staff". College of Arts and Sciences, University of the District of Columbia. Archived from the original on February 12, 2014. Retrieved February 12, 2014. 
  44. ^ Nakamura, David (March 8, 2004). "Officials Hid Facts On Lead, Suit Says: D.C. Government, WASA Blamed". The Washington Post. p. B1. 
  45. ^ a b c d Carey, Maria Helena (March 20, 2014). "Ward Six Councilmember Candidates: Pranav Badhwar". The Hill is Home. 
  46. ^ Madden, Mike (April 2, 2014). "Here's Who Won Yesterday’s Elections". Washington City Paper. 
  47. ^ "Official Ballot: Mayoral General Election: District of Columbia: Tuesday, November 4, 2014" (pdf). District of Columbia Board of Elections. 
  48. ^ Antoine, LaTrina (February 1, 2014). "D.C. Board of Elections Prepares for Earlier-Than-Usual Primary". Afro-American Red Star. p. A4. 
  49. ^ Chibbaro Jr., Lou (January 15, 2014). "D.C. Council candidates court LGBT voters". Washington Blade. 
  50. ^ Alcindor, Yamiche (September 23, 2009). "A Day Without the Detriments of Driving". The Washington Post. p. B4. 
  51. ^ "Deflecting Blame in Shaw" (letter to the editor). The Washington Post. March 5, 2008. p. A20. 
  52. ^ Antoine, LaTrina (February 1, 2014). "D.C. Board of Elections Prepares for Earlier-Than-Usual Primary". Afro-American Red Star. p. A4. 
  53. ^ Labbe-DeBose, Theola (November 2, 2011). "Debate lingers over police presence". The Washington Post. p. B1. 

External links[edit]