List of equipment of the Philippine Navy

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This is a list of equipment of the Philippine Navy, including current assets of the Philippine Fleet and the Naval Air Group (NAG), as well as those that are planned to be acquired. For the list of retired naval ships see List of decommissioned ships of the Philippine Navy.

Major Surface combatants[edit]

Pohang class corvette[edit]

Korean-designed general purpose corvettes made originally for the Republic of Korea Navy, which were then transferred to several friendly countries including the Philippines. Designed for coastal defense and anti-submarine operations. Being utilized by the Philippine Navy for anti-submarine warfare (ASW) training in preparation for transition to the new frigates being built in South Korea for the Philippine Navy. More units are expected to be requested for transfer, as the ROKN retires several more.

Origin:  South Korea

Size Performance Armament Other features
Displacement:
1,200 tons
Length:
88.3 metres (290 ft)
Complement:
95
Propulsion:
Combined Diesel or Gas (CODOG)
Maximum speed:
32 knots (59 km/h; 37 mph)
Range:
4,000 nautical miles (7,400 km; 4,600 mi) at 15 knots
2 × Oto Melara Compact 76mm/62 caliber gun
2 × Otobreda Twin 40mm/70 caliber guns
2 × triple Mark 32 torpedo tubes
2 × Depth Charge Racks for 12 Mark 9 Depth Charges
4 × Browning M2HB .50 caliber heavy machine guns
Aviation:
None
Radar:
Raytheon AN/SPS-64(V)5B surface search radar
Sonar:
Raytheon AN/SQS-58 hull mounted
Name Pennant number Commissioned Unit Notes
Conrado Yap PS-39 5 August 2019 Offshore Combat Force

Del Pilar class offshore patrol vessel[edit]

Formerly US Coast Guard cutters of the Hamilton-class, granted to the Philippine Navy as part of US Military Assistance Program. The first ship BRP Gregorio del Pilar was handed over by the US Coast Guard to the Philippine Navy on 13 May 2011, and commissioned on 14 December 2011. Currently the 3 ships of the class are the most capable surface combatants of the Philippine Navy, and are being used to train the organization on modern warship operations in preparation for future new assets being acquired under the Revised AFP Modernizastion Program. The class will undergo sensor upgrades, with the US government providing SAAB AN/SPS-77 Sea Giraffe AMB 3D air/surface search radars,[1] FLIR Systems SEAFLIR 230 electro-optical/infra-red (EO/IR) system, and BAE Systems Mark 38 Mod.2 25mm gun systems under FMS & FMF programs. A separate upgrade program funded by the Philippine Navy will see the introduction of a new Combat Management System, Electronic Support Measures (R-ESM), and Hull Mounted Sonar (HMS).[2]

Origin:  United States

Size Performance Armament Other features
Displacement:
3,250 tons
Length:
115.2 metres (378 ft)
Complement:
85 + attached aircrew and boarding team
Propulsion:
Combined Diesel or Gas (CODOG)
Maximum speed:
29 knots (54 km/h; 33 mph)
Range:
14,000 nautical miles (26,000 km; 16,000 mi)
1 × Oto Melara Compact Mark 75 76mm/62 caliber gun
2 × 25mm Mark 38 Mod.2 or Mod.3 Typhoon autocannon system (only on PS-15 & PS-16)
1 × 25mm Mark 38 Mod.1 Bushmaster autocannon (only on PS-15)
6 × Browning M2HB .50 caliber heavy machine guns
Aviation:
1 x AW109E Power
Radar:
Kelvin Hughes SharpEye X & S-band radar (on PS-15 & PS-16),
Furuno FAR 3220BB X & S-band radar (on PS-17)
Sonar:
None
Name Pennant number Commissioned Unit Notes
Gregorio del Pilar PS-15 14 December 2011 Offshore Combat Force Current flagship of the Philippine Navy
Ramon Alcaraz PS-16 22 November 2013 Offshore Combat Force
Andres Bonifacio PS-17 21 July 2016 Offshore Combat Force

Rizal class offshore patrol vessel[edit]

Formerly Auk-class minesweepers used by the US Navy during World War II, and was among the ships provided by the US government to allies after the war. The Philippine Navy received 2 ships starting in 1965. Considered among the oldest active warships of the Philippine Navy, and also among the oldest in the world.[3][4] These ships are expected to be replaced soon, once the Philippine Navy commissions newer ships along the acquisition pipeline between 2018 and 2022.[5]

Origin:  United States

Size Performance Armament Other features
Displacement:
1,250 tons full load
Length:
67.41 metres (221.2 ft)
Complement:
80 + attached boarding team
Propulsion
Diesel Engines
Maximum speed:
20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph)
Range:
5,000 nautical miles (9,300 km; 5,800 mi) at 14 knots
2 × Mark 22 3"/50 caliber guns
2 × Bofors Mark 1 Twin 40mm/60 caliber anti-aircraft guns
2 × Oerlikon Mark 4 20mm/70 caliber guns
4 × Browning M2HB .50 caliber heavy machine guns
Aviation:
None
Radar:
Raytheon AN/SPS-64(V)11 surface search radar
Sonar:
None
Name Pennant number Commissioned Unit Notes
Rizal PS-74 18 June 1965 Offshore Combat Force
Quezon PS-70 19 August 1967 Offshore Combat Force

Jacinto class offshore patrol vessel[edit]

Former Peacock-class patrol vessel patrol vessels of the Royal Navy's Hong Kong Squadron until they were sold to the Philippines in 1997 upon the hand-over of Hong Kong to the Chinese government. They were first commissioned between 1983 and 1984, simply designed and are tropicalized for operations in the Asia.[3][4] The ships underwent several phases of upgrades undertaken by the Philippine Navy, with the first one completed in 2005 replacing the old radar and navigation systems. The second upgrade involved the improvements on its marine engineering systems, and a third upgrade included the improvement of combat systems.[6][7]

Origin:  United Kingdom

Size Performance Armament Other features
Displacement:
712 tons full load
Length:
62.6 metres (205 ft)
Complement:
31
Propulsion:
Diesel Engines
Maximum speed:
25 knots (46 km/h; 29 mph)
Range:
2,500 nautical miles (4,600 km; 2,900 mi) at 17 knots
1 × Oto Melara Compact 76mm/62 caliber gun
1 × MSI Defence Seahawk 20mm autocannon system
2 × Mark 16 20mm guns
2 × Browning M2HB .50 caliber heavy machine guns
Aviation:
None
Radar:
GEM Eletronicca Sea Eagle X & S-band radar (on PS-35), Kelvin Hughes SharpEye X & S-band radar (on PS-36 & PS-37)
Sonar:
None
Name Pennant number Commissioned Unit Notes
Emilio Jacinto PS-35 4 August 1997 Offshore Combat Force
Apolinario Mabini PS-36 4 August 1997 Offshore Combat Force
Artemio Ricarte PS-37 4 August 1997 Offshore Combat Force

Malvar class offshore patrol vessel[edit]

The ships making up this class actually came from different classes of former US Navy ships using a common hull: Admirable-class minesweepers, PCE-842-class patrol craft escorts, and PCE(R)-842-class rescue patrol craft escorts. The ships were handed over by the US government as part of Military Assistance, either directly to the Philippines becoming the first major surface combatants of the newly formed post-war Philippine Navy, or to the South Vietnamese government. Several of those given to South Vietnam eventually were absorbed with the Philippine Navy upon their escape during the end of the Vietnam War.[3][4] Considered the oldest active warship of the Philippine Navy and in the world, BRP Pangasinan serving the fleet for 70 years. Several units were already decommissioned or lost through the years, although 3 ships are still in active service with the Offshore Combat Force. These ships are expected to be replaced soon, once the Philippine Navy commissions newer ships along the acquisition pipeline between 2018 and 2022.[5]

Origin:  United States

Size Performance Armament Other features
Displacement:
914 tons full load
Length:
56.2 metres (184 ft)
Complement:
85
Propulsion
Diesel Engines
Maximum speed:
16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph) or even less
Range:
6,600 nautical miles (12,200 km; 7,600 mi) at 11 knots
1 × Mark 22 3"/50 caliber guns
3 × Bofors Mark 3 40mm/60 caliber or 3 × Bofors Mark 1 Twin 40mm/60 caliber anti-aircraft guns
4 × Oerlikon Mark 10 20mm/70 caliber guns
4 × Browning M2HB .50 caliber heavy machine guns
Aviation:
None
Radar:
Furuno or Kelvin Hughes X & S-band surface search radar
Sonar:
None
Name Pennant number Commissioned Unit Notes
Miguel Malvar PS-19 7 February 1977 Offshore Combat Force
Magat Salamat PS-20 7 February 1977 Offshore Combat Force
Pangasinan PS-31 2 July 1948 Offshore Combat Force 70 years in service
Eight additional ships (Datu Tupas, Datu Marikudo,Cebu,Negros Occidental, Leyte, Iloilo, Samar, and Sultan Kudarat) retired from service

Major Amphibious Warfare Vessels[edit]

Tarlac class landing platform dock[edit]

New Indonesian-made landing platform docks, current the Philippine Navy's foremost amphibious warfare platform and its first major brand new ship acquisition since the 1990s. It was acquired under the "Strategic Sealift Vessel" project and was based on the Indonesian Makassar-class landing platform dock. The ships can carry up a Philippine Marine Battalion Landing Team (MBLT) with up to 500 fully armed marines and their vehicles and equipment, and carries two small landing craft utilities (LCU) with it. It has a helicopter deck capable of accommodating 2 12-ton helicopters, as well as a hangar for 1 helicopter.[8] The ships are expected to be installed with additional weapons and improved sensor systems.[9] More are being planned for acquisition, either the same or slightly different design, under the Philippine Navy's RAFPMP Horizon 2 modernization program.[10]

Origin:  Indonesia

Size Performance Armament Other features
Displacement:
11,583 tons full load
Length:
123 metres (404 ft)
Complement:
121 + attached aircrew
500 Marines
Propulsion:
Combined Diesel and Diesel (CODAD)
Maximum speed:
16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph)
Range:
9,360 nautical miles (17,330 km; 10,770 mi)
8 × Browning M2HB .50 caliber heavy machine guns
fitted for but not with heavier weapons
Aviation:
2-spot helicopter deck
Boats Carried:
2 × LCU in well deck
2 × RHIB at boat davits
Vehicle Deck:
2,800 tons of vehicles & cargo inc. 4 × AAVs
Name Pennant number Commissioned Unit Notes
Tarlac LD-601 1 June 2016 Sealift Amphibious Force
Davao del Sur LD-602 31 May 2017 Sealift Amphibious Force

Bacolod City class logistics support vessel[edit]

The Bacolod City-class is the Philippine Navy's main amphibious operation platform prior to the delivery of the Tarlac-class LPD. The two ships were acquired through US Foreign Military Sales (FMS) program. A contract for two ships was announced by Trinity Marine on 3 April 1992, with an option for a third ship which was not taken up. The design was based on a modified version of the US Army's General Frank S. Besson-class LSV, but without accommodation for 150 troops using the space originally for the stern ramp, and the addition of a small helicopter deck. The ship is used in a similar fashion as a Landing Ship-Tank, able to land troops and equipment directly to the beach.[3][11]

Origin:  United States

Size Performance Armament Other features
Displacement:
4,265 tons full load
Length:
83 metres (272 ft)
Complement:
30
150 Marines
Propulsion:
Diesel Engines
Maximum speed:
12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph)
Range:
8,300 nautical miles (15,400 km; 9,600 mi)
2 × Oerlikon Mark 4 20mm/70 caliber guns
4 × Browning M2HB .50 caliber heavy machine guns
Aviation:
1-spot helicopter deck
Boats Carried:
2 × LCVP at boat davits
Vehicle Deck:
2,280 tons of vehicles & cargo
Name Pennant number Commissioned Unit Notes
Bacolod City LS-550 1 December 1993 Sealift Amphibious Force
Dagupan City LS-551 5 April 1994 Sealift Amphibious Force

LST-1/LST-542 class landing ship tank[edit]

Former US Navy landing ships-tank that served during World War II, and transferred to numerous countries including the Philippines. The Philippine Navy received its first ships of the class on 30 December 1946, and has received almost 30 units between 1946 and 1976. Some of those that were received came through South Vietnam as several ships were absorbed by the Philippine Navy upon their escape at the end of the Vietnam War.[3] One of the ships, BRP Sierra Madre is technically retired from service, but was deliberately grounded at Ayungin Shoal and is treated as an active ship despite being modified as a semi-permanent structure and outpost to a few Philippine Marines stationed in the contested territory.[12] Some of the ships were also used as helicopter platforms, stationing utility helicopters from the Philippine Air Force in several occasions, including during tensions with China in the Mischief Reef in 1995.[13]

Origin:  United States

Size Performance Armament Other features
Displacement:
4,080 tons full load
Length:
100 metres (330 ft)
Complement:
110
200 Marines
Propulsion:
Diesel Engines
Maximum speed:
10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph)
Range:
24,000 nautical miles (44,000 km; 28,000 mi)
2 × Bofors Mark 1 Twin 40mm/60 caliber anti-aircraft guns
4 × Bofors Mark 1 40mm/60 caliber anti-aircraft guns
8 × Oerlikon Mark 4 20mm/70 caliber guns
4 × Browning M2HB .50 caliber heavy machine guns
Aviation:
main open deck can be used as 2-spot helicopter deck
Boats Carried:
2 × LCVP at boat davits
Vehicle Deck:
2,100 tons of vehicles & cargo
Name Pennant number Commissioned Unit Notes
Laguna LS-501 13 September 1976 Sealift Amphibious Force
Benguet LS-507 13 September 1976 Sealift Amphibious Force
Sierra Madre LS-57 5 April 1976 - Outpost at Ayungin / Second Thomas Shoal
At least twenty five (25) other ships of the class were retired from service (refer to List of decommissioned landing ships-tank of the Philippine Navy for full list).

Inshore Patrol Surface Assets[edit]

Cyclone class littoral patrol vessel[edit]

The Cyclone class are actually US Navy inshore patrol ships currently being used by the United States Naval Special Warfare Command for low intensity conflict environment. The Philippine Navy's ship is actually the lead class, formerly the USS Cyclone (PC-1), and was transferred at a time when the US Special Operations Command rejected the class for being too big for commando missions, while the Navy Fleet found them too small for patrol and combat missions. After transferring USS Cyclone, the US Navy revised its plans and intended to keep the remaining ships of the fleet. The Philippine Navy has made it known in the past that they are interested in more units if the US intends to retire some other ships of the class.

Origin:  United States

Size Performance Armament Other features
Displacement:
357 tons full load
Length:
51.9 metres (170 ft)
Complement:
28
Propulsion:
Diesel Engines
Maximum speed:
35 knots (65 km/h; 40 mph)
Range:
2,900 nautical miles (5,400 km; 3,300 mi)
1 × Mark 38 Mod.1 Bushmaster 20mm autocannon
1 × Mark 96 Mod. 0 Bushmaster 20mm autocannon with Mark 19 Mod.3 40mm automatic grenade launcher
6 × Browning M2HB .50 caliber heavy machine guns
2 × M60 7.62mm general purpose machine gun
Aviation:
None
Radar:
Sperry Marine RASCAR 3400C surface search radar
Sonar:
Wesmar side-scanning hull-mounted
Name Pennant number Commissioned Unit Notes
General Mariano Alvarez PS-38 8 March 2004 Offshore Combat Force

Kagitingan class littoral patrol craft[edit]

Originally designed and built in Germany, the Kagitingan class was supposed to be built in numbers in the Philippines after the initial unit. It was reported that the ships did not reach their potential design and were underpowered and problematic, and were retired in the 1990s but was pressed again to serve due to lack of operating naval assets. Out of four, only 2 ships of the class remain and are expected to be retired from service as more new assets become available.

Origin:  Germany

Size Performance Armament Other features
Displacement:
160 tons full load
Length:
37 metres (121 ft)
Complement:
30
Propulsion:
Diesel Engines
Maximum speed:
21 knots (39 km/h; 24 mph)
Range:
2,300 nautical miles (4,300 km; 2,600 mi)
1 × Emerlec EX-31 30mm twin guns (only on PB-102)
1 × Bofors Mark 3 40mm/60 caliber gun (only on PB-104)
4 × Browning M2HB .50 caliber heavy machine guns
2 × M60 7.62mm general purpose machine gun
Aviation:
None
Radar:
Furuno navigation radar
Sonar:
None
Name Pennant number Commissioned Unit Notes
Bagong Lakas PB-102 9 February 1979 Littoral Combat Force
Bagong Silang PB-104 June 1983 Littoral Combat Force
Two additional ships (Kagitingan and Katapangan) retired from service

Tomas Batilo class fast attack craft[edit]

Originally from South Korea and are known as the Chamsuri-class patrol killer medium (PKM-200 series) fast attack craft. These boats were designed for coastal patrol against North Korean patrol boats. 8 were handed-over to the Philippine Navy starting 1995. Designed and built by Korea Tacoma Shipyard in South Korea from the late 1970s, these boats are heavily armed for their size as their intention is to overwhelm similar-sized boats with heavy firepower. Armaments and fit-out differ on several boats, both due to modifications made by the Republic of Korea Navy based on batches and due to changes made by the Philippine Navy over the years to fit their requirement. Some of the boats were already retired as the Philippine Navy undergo modernization and acquisition of new replacements.

Origin:  South Korea

Size Performance Armament Other features
Displacement:
144 tons full load
Length:
37 metres (121 ft)
Complement:
31
Propulsion:
Diesel Engines
Maximum speed:
33 knots (61 km/h; 38 mph)
Range:
600 nautical miles (1,100 km; 690 mi) @ 20 knots
1 × Emerlec EX-31 30mm twin guns or
1 × Bofors Mark 3 40mm/60 caliber gun
2 × Oerlikon Mark 4 20mm/70 caliber guns
4 × Browning M2HB .50 caliber heavy machine guns
Aviation:
None
Radar:
Furuno or Koden MDC 1500 navigation/surface search radar
Sonar:
None
Name Pennant number Commissioned Unit Notes
Boni Serrano PB-111 22 May 1996 Littoral Combat Force
Salvador Abcede PB-114 22 May 1996 Littoral Combat Force
Nicolas Mahusay PB-116 2 June 1998 Littoral Combat Force
Emilio Liwanag PB-118 15 April 2011 Littoral Combat Force
Four additional ships (Tomas Batilo, Bienvenido Salting, Ramon Aguirre, and Dionisio Ojeda) retired from service

Patrol Boats[edit]

Class Photo Type Name Unit Origin Notes
Patrol craft (24 in service)
Jose Andrada class BRP Juan Magluyan Coastal patrol craft BRP Jose Andrada
BRP Enrique Jurado
BRP Alfredo Peckson
BRP Simeon Castro
BRP Carlos Albert
BRP Heracleo Alano
BRP Liberato Picar
BRP Hilario Ruiz
BRP Rafael Pargas
BRP Nestor Reinoso
BRP Dioscoro Papa
BRP Ismael Lomibao
BRP Leovigildo Gantioqui
BRP Federico Martir
BRP Filipino Flojo
BRP Anastacio Cacayorin
BRP Manuel Gomez
BRP Teotimo Figoracion
BRP Jose Loor Sr.
BRP Juan Magluyan
BRP Florencio Inigo
BRP Felix Apolinario
 United States &
 Philippines
Alberto Navarette class BRP Abraham Campo (PG-396) Coastal patrol craft BRP Alberto Navarette (PC-394)
BRP Abraham Campo (PC-396)
 United States Ex-US Coast Guard Point-class cutters.
Landing Crafts (10 in Service)
BRP TAGBANUA (AT-296).jpg Large landing craft utility BRP Tagbanua  Philippines BRP Tagbanua is the largest Philippine-made naval vessel launched to date. Size is similar to the Landing Craft Heavy although it was classified as an LCU.
BRP Manobo (AT-297) new.jpg Landing craft utility BRP Manobo (AT-297)  Philippines BRP Manobo is a new ship, replacing an original Mk. 6 LCU with the same hull number and name although the design is different.
Ivatan class BRP Batak and BRP Ivatan.jpg Landing craft heavy BRP Ivatan
BRP Batak
BRP Waray
BRP Iwak
BRP Agta
 Australia Former RAN Balikpapan-class ships.[14][15]
LCU Mk.6 class BRP TAUSUG.jpg Landing craft utility BRP Subanon (AT-291)
BRP Bagobo (AT-293)
BRP Tausug (AT-295)
 United States Former US Mk. 6 LCU.
Auxiliary ships (10 in service)
BRP Ang Pangulo Presidential yacht BRP Ang Pangulo  Japan
R/V Melville Research vessel BRP Gregorio Velasquez (AGR-702)  United States Former UNOLS R/V Melville.
BRP Fort Abad.jpg Survey vessel BRP Fort San Antonio (AM-700)
BRP Fort Abad (AM-701)
[16]
BRP Mangyan (AS-71) Coastal freighter BRP Mangyan  United States Ex-US Army and ex-USN FS-524.
BRP Lake Caliraya Replenishment tanker BRP Lake Caliraya  China One of the three former oil tankers from the Philippine National Oil Corporation.[17] Two more undergoing refurbishing prior to commissioning.
Fuel tanker BRP Lake Buhi (AF-78)  United States Ex-USN YO-78/YOG-73 gasoline barge.
Water tanker BRP Lake Buluan (AW-33)  United States Similar to Lake Mainit class.
Small harbor tug BRP Ilonggot (YT-225)
BRP Tasaday (YT-226)
YT-273
YT-228
 United States Ex-US YTL-572 small harbor tug.
ex-US YTL-425 small harbor tug[16]
Missile Boats (6 in Service)
Multi-Purpose Attack Craft Mk. 3 MPAC MK III a.png Missile boats BA-488
BA-489
BA-491
BA-492
BA-493
BA-494
 Taiwan/ Philippines BA-488, BA-489 and BA-491 commissioned on May 22, 2017,[18] armed with Spike-ER missiles.[19] while BA-492, BA-493 and BA-494 were commissioned on 23 September 2019.[20] Those commissioned in 2019 are still awaiting their missile and RCWS armaments.
Other Surface Assets
Multi-Purpose Attack Craft Mk. 2 Philippine Navy MPAC Mk2 Panguan.jpg Assault crafts BA-485
BA-486
BA-487
 Taiwan/ Philippines
Multi-Purpose Attack Craft Mk. 1 Philippine Navy Multi-Purpose Attack Craft.jpg Assault crafts BA-482
BA-483
BA-484
 Taiwan
Type 966Y PN China Boat 1.jpg Patrol Craft 4  China Four patrol craft donated by the Chinese government, formally received July 27, 2018.[21][22]
De Havilland 9209-class patrol craft DF-323 Side View.JPG Patrol boats PB-320[23]
PB-321[24]
PB-322[25]
PB-323[26]
 Australia [27]
Swift Mk.3-class Patrol boats PB-333[28]
PB-336[29]
PB-338[30]
PB-339[31]
PB-340[32]
PB-341[33]
PB-343[34]
PB-348[35]
PB-349[36]
PB-350[37]
PB-351[38]
PB-352[39]
PB-353[40]
PB-354[41]
 United States Former US Navy Swift Mk.3 fast patrol crafts. Some units were transferred to Philippine Coast Guard (PCG).[42]
Riverine utility craft LCM-1E L602.jpg Utility craft VU-102
VU-103
VU-106
VU-469
VU-471
Unknown [43]
BRP Davao del Sur Landing Craft.jpg Small Landing Craft Utility LC-601-1
LC-601-2
LC-602-1
LC-602-2
 Indonesia Integral LCU of the BRP Tarlac (LD-601) and BRP Davao del Sur (LD-602), each two vessels delivered and commissioned together with Tarlac-class landing platform dock, respectively.
Rigid-hulled inflatable boats Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat - Rear View @ 2018 Kalayaan Parade.jpg Patrol boats unknown Numerous, from different sources and in different sizes.
Miscellaneous Surface Assets
Floating Cranes Crane vessel YU-207[44]
YU-206
YU-205
YU-204
 United States Built by Todd Shipyards in Seattle Washington, 140 feet 1,407 t derrick barge built for US Navy in 1952 as YD-191 and sold 1980 to PN[45][46]
AFDL-1-class Floating Drydock YD-200
YD-204
YD-205
 United States Former US small auxiliary floating drydocks. YD-200 transferred in 1948, YD-204 purchased in 1980. YD-205 loaned in 1969, purchased in 1980.[47][48][49]

Naval Air Group[edit]

Aircraft Photo Origin Role Version Quantity Notes
Fixed-wing Aircraft
Beechcraft King Air T 44 4LR.jpg  United States Maritime patrol aircraft C-90 5 Former JMSDF trainers transferred to the Naval Air Group as Maritime patrol aircraft with ISR capability.[50]
BN-2 Islander NAVY 311 lands at the rugged airstrip of Alabat.jpg  United Kingdom Maritime patrol aircraft / Light transport aircraft BN-2A 5[51]
Cessna 172 Skyhawk Philippine Navy cessna.jpg  United States Trainer / Light utility aircraft 172F[52]
172N[52]
3
Helicopters
AgustaWestland AW159 Royal Navy Wildcat Helicopter MOD 45158434.jpg  United Kingdom Anti-Submarine Warfare AW159 2 Delivered in 2019.[53]
AgustaWestland AW109 Philippine Navy Agusta A-109E Power.jpg  Italy Multi-purpose naval helicopter AW-109E Power 5 3 units equipped with FN RMP (Rocket Machine Gun Pod) designated to each of the Gregorio del Pilar-class Frigates, while the other two are used for interim shipborne operations on Tarlac-class LPDs.
MBB Bo 105 Philippine Navy BO-105C.jpg  Germany Utility helicopter Bo 105C 3[51]
Robinson R22 Philippine Navy Robinson R-22.jpg  United States Training helicopter R22 Beta II[52] 2[52]

Ship Weapon Systems[edit]

Guns[edit]

Missiles[edit]

For New Ships and Aircraft, the Navy Acquired:

Future Ships[edit]

Class Photo Type Ships Origin Notes
Jose Rizal-class Frigate BRP Jose Rizal (FF-150).jpg Frigate BRP Jose Rizal
BRP Antonio Luna
 South Korea New frigate project, awarded to Hyundai Heavy Industries on October 24, 2016, scheduled for delivery starting 2020 (first ship) and 2021 (second ship).[54]
Replenishment tanker BRP Lake Danao (AT-82)
ex-PNOC Emilio Jacinto
 China Former oil tanker from the Philippine National Oil Corporation.[17]
Future Landing Platform Dock SSV - New Version @ Naval Defense 2019.jpg Landing Platform Dock The Philippine Navy released a requirement for two more LPDs which are believed to be improvements over the Tarlac-class. Tender currently ongoing.[55]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dominguez, Gabriel (21 May 2018). "Philippine Navy to receive Saab's Sea Giraffe AMB radar". IHS Jane's Defence Weekly. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  2. ^ MaxDefense Philippines 23 May 2018
  3. ^ a b c d e Saunders, Stephen (2004). Jane's Fighting Ships 2004–2005 (107th ed.). Jane's Information Group Ltd.
  4. ^ a b c Wertheim, Eric (2007). The Naval Institute Guide to Combat Fleets of the World (15th ed.). Naval Institute Press. p. 552. ISBN 9781591149552.
  5. ^ a b Montero, Max (17 October 2018). "More Details on the Philippine Navy's Horizon 2 Offshore Patrol Vessel Project after ADAS 2018". MaxDefense Philippines. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  6. ^ Montero, Max (14 March 2016). "Propmech and Saab Wins Philippine Navy's Jacinto-class Patrol Vessel Upgrade Phase 3B Project". MaxDefense Philippines. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  7. ^ Montero, Max (21 October 2015). "Updates on the Sensors, Fire Control System, and Weapon Systems Upgrade of the Philippine Navy's Jacinto-class Vessels". MaxDefense Philippines. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  8. ^ Montero, Max (30 May 2016). "Discussing the Philippine Navy's First SSV, the Tarlac-class Landing Platform Dock". MaxDefense Philippines. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  9. ^ Ridzwan Rahmat (13 July 2015). "PT PAL outlines weapons fit for Philippine Navy SSVs". Archived from the original on 8 December 2015. Retrieved 2 December 2015.
  10. ^ MaxDefense Philippines 2 October 2018
  11. ^ "Frank S Besson Class". Naval Technology. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  12. ^ Mogato, Manuel (14 July 2015). "Exclusive: Philippines reinforcing rusting ship on Spratly reef outpost – sources". Reuters. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  13. ^ Associated Press (1995). "Spratly Islands – China/Philippines 'Incident' – 1995". AP Archives. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  14. ^ "Australia's gift to PH Navy: 2 supply ships". Rapller. 2015-01-29. Retrieved 2015-01-29.
  15. ^ Bulletin, The Manila. "PH Navy gets three ships from Australia". mb.com.ph. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  16. ^ a b http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g56/adroth92/description.jpg
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