NGC 70

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NGC 70
N70s-crop.jpg
NGC 70 is the spiral galaxy in the lower center of this image. The elliptical galaxies neighboring it are NGC 68 (lower) and NGC 71 (upper)
Observation data (J2000 epoch)
ConstellationAndromeda
Right ascension00h 18m 22.55s
Declination+30h 04m 43.4s
Redshift0.023907[1]
Helio radial velocity7167 km/s[1]
Distance320-325 Mly[2][3]
Apparent magnitude (V)13.5[4][2]
Characteristics
TypeSb[5] Sbc[4] SA(rs)c[2]
Size180,000[2]
Apparent size (V)~1.7'x1.4'[5][4][6]
Other designations
IC 1539, UGC 174, Arp 113, VV 166a, MCG +05-01-067, 2MASX J00182252+3004465, IRAS 00157+2948, PGC 001194, UZC J001822.6+300446
See also: Galaxy, List of galaxies

NGC 70 is a spiral galaxy located in the constellation Andromeda.[7] It was discovered on September 11, 1784 by R. J. Mitchell[7] and was also observed on December 19, 1897 by Guillaume Bigourdan from France who described it as "extremely faint, very small, round, between 2 faint stars"[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database - NGC 70". NED. NASA/IPAC. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d e Seligman, Courtney. "New General Catalog Objects: NGC 50 - 99". cseligman.com. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  3. ^ Wright, Ned. "Ned Wright's Javascript Cosmology Calculator". www.astro.ucla.edu. UCLA. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  4. ^ a b c "NGC 70 >> Deep Sky Object Browser". Deep Sky Objects Browser. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  5. ^ a b "NGC 70". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  6. ^ "WIKISKY - NGC 70". wikisky. SKY-MAP.org. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  7. ^ a b "NGC 70". Courtney Seligman. Retrieved 14 March 2015.