Sikorsky HH-52 Seaguard

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HH-52 Seaguard
HH-52A Seaguard with rescue basket 1960s.jpg
A U.S. Coast Guard HH-52A Seaguard using a rescue basket
Role SAR/utility helicopter
Manufacturer Sikorsky Aircraft
First flight 1959
Introduction 1961
Primary user United States Coast Guard
Number built 175

The Sikorsky HH-52 Seaguard (company designation S-62) was a single turbine engine, three-blade rotor amphibious helicopter. Originally developed as a commercial venture by the Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation of Stratford, Connecticut, it was used by the United States Coast Guard primarily for air-sea rescue. The HH-52 has been replaced by non-amphibious types such as the HH-65 Dolphin, which rely solely on the use of a winch from a low hover to conduct rescue operations.

Design and development[edit]

U.S. Coast Guard HH-52A floating on the sea in 1979

A number of S-62s were bought by the US Navy Bureau of Aeronautics for the US Coast Guard for use as a search and rescue helicopter. Initially designated HU2S-1G Seaguard, it was re-designated as the HH-52A Seaguard in 1962.

The HH-52A used a boat hulled shaped fuselage, smaller but similar to the US Navy's SH-3 (Sikorsky S-61), and was employed aboard the larger Coast Guard cutters and icebreakers. The S-62 used a single 1,250 hp (930 kW) General Electric T58-GE-8B turboshaft engine, a derated version of the T58-GE-10 powerplant used on the larger twin-engined SH-3; and a 1,050 hp T58-GE-6 derated to 670 hp, moving the same main and tail rotor as S-55 Model, in the prototype.

The turbine powered S-62 could carry more weight and fly faster than the H-19 (S-55). The aircraft was first conceived and designed to be amphibious so that flotation gear would not be required for over water flights, and rescues could be made by landing on the water. The fuselage is watertight for landings on water or snow. Two outrigger floats resist pitching and rolling on the water. Although the HH-52A looks very different from the Sikorsky H-19, it used many of the same components.

Variants[edit]

N880, S-62 Prototype (cn62001), Paris-Le Bourget (France), June 1959.
A Coast Guard Grumman HU-16E Albatross and a Sikorsky HH-52A Seaguard in March, 1964, probably at CG Air Station Mobile
S-62
Prototype. First flew on the 22nd of May 1958.
S-62A
Amphibious transport helicopter, powered by a General Electric CT58-110-1 turboshaft engine, with accommodation for up to 11 passengers. The S-62A was the first production version.
S-62B
One S-62 was fitted with the main rotor system of the S-58.
S-62C
Company designation of the HH-52A Seaguard.
S-62J
Produced under license in Japan by Mitsubishi.[1]
HU2S-1G
Original designation of the HH-52A Seaguard. Redesignated HH-52A in 1962.
HH-52A Seaguard
Search and rescue helicopter for the United States Coast Guard. 99 built including one transferred to Iceland.

Operators[edit]

Military[edit]

Map with military HH-52 operators in blue
 Japan
 Philippines

Civilian[edit]

 Iceland
 Japan
 Qatar
 Thailand
 United States

Survivors[edit]

HH-52A Seaguard 'USCG1355' at the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola FL
Cockpit of HH-52A Seaguard 'USCG1355' at the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola FL

United States[edit]

Philippines[edit]

Specifications (HH-52A)[edit]

HH-52 Line Drawng.svg

Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1969-70 [28]

General characteristics

Performance

See also[edit]

Related development
Related lists

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ http://archive.is/o8ip
  2. ^ a b "World Helicopter Market 1968 pg 53". Retrieved 2013-02-25. 
  3. ^ "JSDAF S-62". Demand media. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
  4. ^ "World Helicopter Market 1968 pg. 54". flightglobal.com. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
  5. ^ "Phil Air Force S-62". Demand media. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
  6. ^ "Icelandic Coast Guard Service". aeroflight.co.uk. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
  7. ^ Japan Coast Guard: Aircraft Data File | J-HangarSpace: Information on Japanese Aviation
  8. ^ Endres 1979, p. 12.
  9. ^ "World Helicopter Market 1968 pg. 55". flightglobal.com. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
  10. ^ "Sikorsky HH-52A Seaguard" (PDF). uscg.mil. Retrieved 24 February 2013. 
  11. ^ "S-62 (HH-52A, S-62A, S-62B, S-62C)". sikorskyarchives.com. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
  12. ^ "SFO-Helicopter Airlines". Demand media. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
  13. ^ "Aircraft on Display"National Naval Aviation Museum. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  14. ^ http://www.helis.com/database/cn/6883/
  15. ^ Sikorsky S-62A Seaguard (HH-52A) Yanks Air Museum. Retrieved: 8 April 2016.
  16. ^ "Aircraft Collection"USS ALABAMA BATTLESHIP. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  17. ^ "Lis of Aircraft"American Helicopter Museum & Education Center. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  18. ^ "Sikorsky HH-52A Seaguard" Mid-Atlantic Air Museum. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  19. ^ "The Museum of Flight. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  20. ^ "The story of the helicopter that saved 22 sailors from burning ships was forgotten. Until now." The Washington Post. Retrieved: 4 March 2016.
  21. ^ Connor, Roger (14 March 2016). "Celebrating the Centennial of Coast Guard Aviation with the Seaguard". National Air and Space Museum. Retrieved 13 April 2016. 
  22. ^ "Phoenix Project". Coast Guard Aviation Association. Coast Guard Aviation Association. Retrieved 13 April 2016. 
  23. ^ "Sikorsky HH-52A (S-62A) 'Seaguard'"The New England Air Museum. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  24. ^ "Sikorsky HH-52A Seaguard"Pima Air & Space Museum. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  25. ^ "HH-52 Helicopter"Naval Air Station Wildwood Aviation Museum. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  26. ^ [1]
  27. ^ http://www.airliners.net/photo/Philippines---Air/Sikorsky-(Mitsubishi)-S-62J/1645396/L/&sid=b34b952929a8b5fe686e976f39a545bc
  28. ^ Taylor 1969, pp. 434–434.
  29. ^ a b c Sikorsky Preflight Reference Cards
Bibliography
  • Endres, Günter G. World Airline Fleets 1979. Hounslow, UK: Airline Publications and Sales Ltd., 1979, ISBN 0-905117-53-0.
  • Taylor, John W. R.. Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1969-70. London:Jane's Yearbooks, 1969.

External links[edit]