Spencer, Indiana

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Spencer, Indiana
Town
Owen County courthouse in Spencer
Owen County courthouse in Spencer
Location of Spencer in the state of Indiana
Location of Spencer in the state of Indiana
Coordinates: 39°17′13″N 86°45′51″W / 39.28694°N 86.76417°W / 39.28694; -86.76417Coordinates: 39°17′13″N 86°45′51″W / 39.28694°N 86.76417°W / 39.28694; -86.76417
Country United States
State Indiana
County Owen
Township Washington
Area[1]
 • Total 1.26 sq mi (3.26 km2)
 • Land 1.26 sq mi (3.26 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 561 ft (171 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 2,217
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 2,328
 • Density 1,759.5/sq mi (679.3/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 47460
Area code(s) 812
FIPS code 18-71972[4]
GNIS feature ID 0443934[5]
Website http://www.spencer.in.gov/
The Cinema 67 Drive-in theatre near Spencer, IN

Spencer is a town in Washington Township, Owen County, Indiana, United States. The population was 2,217 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Owen County.[6]

Spencer is part of the Bloomington, Indiana Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Spencer was platted in 1820. It was named for Captain Spier Spencer, who fell at the Battle of Tippecanoe.[7]

Geography[edit]

Spencer is located at 39°17′13″N 86°45′51″W / 39.28694°N 86.76417°W / 39.28694; -86.76417 (39.286848, -86.764225).[8]

According to the 2010 census, Spencer has a total area of 1.26 square miles (3.26 km2), all land.[1]

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Spencer has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[9]


Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 335
1870 971
1880 1,655 70.4%
1890 1,868 12.9%
1900 2,026 8.5%
1910 2,150 6.1%
1920 2,066 −3.9%
1930 2,179 5.5%
1940 2,375 9.0%
1950 2,394 0.8%
1960 2,557 6.8%
1970 2,553 −0.2%
1980 2,732 7.0%
1990 2,609 −4.5%
2000 2,508 −3.9%
2010 2,217 −11.6%
Est. 2014 2,280 [10] 2.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 2,217 people, 1,008 households, and 554 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,759.5 inhabitants per square mile (679.3/km2). There were 1,123 housing units at an average density of 891.3 per square mile (344.1/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 98.1% White, 0.1% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.1% of the population.

There were 1,008 households of which 24.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.4% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 45.0% were non-families. 40.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.12 and the average family size was 2.81.

The median age in the town was 41.8 years. 20.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.2% were from 25 to 44; 26.3% were from 45 to 64; and 19.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 47.2% male and 52.8% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 2,508 people, 1,090 households, and 659 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,984.6 people per square mile (768.5/km²). There were 1,193 housing units at an average density of 944.0 per square mile (365.6/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.52% White, 0.20% African American, 0.40% Asian, 0.24% from other races, and 0.64% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.60% of the population.

There were 1,090 households out of which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.1% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.5% were non-families. 35.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.23 and the average family size was 2.88.

In the town the population was spread out with 23.0% under the age of 18, 10.1% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 20.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 83.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.9 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $28,664, and the median income for a family was $36,921. Males had a median income of $29,679 versus $21,531 for females. The per capita income for the town was $15,843. About 8.4% of families and 9.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.2% of those under age 18 and 8.8% of those age 65 or over.

General[edit]

Owen County Courthouse, Spencer, Indiana

Spencer, Indiana was named after a soldier, George Spencer, who fought in the Battle of Tippecanoe on 7 November 1811, and died on the battlefield after being shot three times. John Tipton, a Tippecanoe veteran and a commander of the Indiana Rangers, was given the honor of naming the town on 12 February 1820, as he writes in his journal: "the Citizens then gave me the honor of naming the new Town which I Called Spencer after my friend George Spencer who fell in the Battle of Tippicannoe."[12]

The Town of Spencer was laid out in 1820 and the first auction for lots took place. The first court house was built of logs and replaced in 1825 with a brick courthouse. That courthouse stood until 1910 when the current courthouse was constructed to replace it. In 1890 a steam driven dynamo was installed in Spencer for carbon arc street lights. Spencer also recently passed Indianapolis as the town with the most married couples with children per capital in the state.

Owen Valley Community High School (OVHS) is located in Spencer with 980 students and more than 100 faculty members. Built in 1971, OVHS is the result of a consolidation of several smaller schools located within Owen County. Owen Valley's mascot is the Patriot, and the school's colors are red, white and blue. The school's yearbook is the Triad, Tri- meaning the three schools that were merged to make Owen Valley High School.

Spencer is also the home of the Spencer PRIDE Festival, an annual event celebrating shared values of both LGBTQ and straight communities.

Notable People[edit]

Military[edit]

Army[edit]

  • U.S. Army General Thomas Alexander McNaught was born near Spencer on 8 September 1826, one of the eleven children of Thomas and Catherine (Bartholomew) McNaught. He enlisted in April 1846 into Company A, 3d Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and left service in July 1847. When civil war broke out, he enlisted into Company A, 59th Indiana Infantry Regiment and elected captain after raising a company on 10 October 1861, rising in rank to become a brevetted Brigadier General on 4 August 1865 and ultimately taking command of the First Brigade of the Third Division in the Fifteen Army Corps. He took part in the siege of New Madrid, march to Iuka, movement to Milliken's Bend, Battle of Raymond, Battle of Jackson, Battle of Champion Hill, Black River, Lookout Mountain and Mission Ridge, Battle of Vicksburg, and Siege of Corinth. He participated in Sherman's March to the Sea from Dalton to Atlanta and the capture of Savannah .[13] He died on 10 March 1919 and was buried in River Hill Cemetery, south of Spencer.[14]
Colonel Scott S. Haraburda, Commander, 464th Chemical Brigade.jpg HCHE.jpg
Helical-Coil Heat Exchanger
MET Sketch 1.jpg
Colonel Scott S. Haraburda Microwave Rocket Thruster

Navy[edit]

  • U.S. Navy Admiral John Howard Cassady was born in Spencer on 3 April 1896 to William Franklin and Samantha Haxton Cassady. After attending Spencer High School, he went on to graduate from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1918 (Class of 1919).[39] He was married to Sallie (née Dold), having two sons, John H. Jr. and William F. Cassady. During World War II in the Pacific Theater, he commanded the aircraft carrier USS Saratoga (CV-3), taking command from then Captain Mullinnix, in what is probably the only time in naval history that an officer relinquished command of a ship to another born from the same small town.[40] He commanded the Saratoga until he was promoted to rear admiral in 1944. From May 1952 to March 1954, Admiral Cassady served as the commander of the United States Sixth Fleet followed by Commander in Chief Naval Forces Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean until his retirement in May 1956.[39][41][42] He died on 25 January 1969 and is buried with his wife in Arlington National Cemetery.[43]

Air Force[edit]

Lieutenant Colonel Hickam, who commanded the 3rd Attack Group from 1932-34
  • U.S. Army Air Corps Lieutenant Colonel Horace Meek Hickam was a famous pilot for the United States in the earlier half of the 20th century. The son of a lawyer, Hickam was born in Spencer on 14 August 1885, the eldest of four children. Hickam's association with aviation began with the United States' entry into World War I. He was involved in the Mexican Punitive Expedition. By the end of his career, he had achieved the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and received a Silver Star. Colonel Hickam was killed in a landing accident at Fort Crockett, Galveston, Texas, on 5 November 1934. His fame as being a pioneering figure in aviation and aerospace science eventually led to the naming of the United States Air Force Base in Hawaii, "Hickam AFB" in his honor.[46]

Other[edit]

  • Helen (Nellie) Artie Tarleton Belles, the mother of former British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan was from Spencer.[49] She was born in Indianapolis to Joshua Tarleton Belles, MD and Julia (Reid) on 20 August 1856, the only surviving child of their five children. After her mother died when she was six, her family moved to Spencer where she spent her childhood. She married her first husband, John Bayliss Hill, an Indianapolis artist, in 1874, a marriage that lasted about a year until his death. She married Maurice Macmillian in 1884 and moved to London, returning to Spencer three years later for a visit. She died on 26 October 1937.[50]
  • Ernest M. Viquesney was born in Spencer on 5 August 1876, the only child of Alfred P. and Jane (née Lehman) Viquesney.[51] He was a Spanish-American War veteran.[52] In 1928, he built the Tivoli Theatre in Spencer.[53][54] He was an American sculptor best known for his very popular World War I monument Spirit of the American Doughboy, one of which is located in front of the Owen County Courthouse.[51][55] Shortly after the death of his second wife, Elizabeth "Betty" (née Sadler), he killed himself on 4 October 1946, the day after the thirteenth anniversary of the death of his first wife, Cora B. (née Barnes), all three buried at Riverside Cemetery in Spencer.[53]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-11. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-25. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  7. ^ Blanchard, Charles (1884). Counties of Clay and Owen, Indiana: Historical and Biographical. F.A. Battey & Company. p. 665. 
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  9. ^ Climate Summary for Spencer, Indiana
  10. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  12. ^ Tipton, John (1942) "Owen County Journal, 1820" The John Tipton Papers: Volume 1, 1809-1827, Indiana Historical Bureau. p. 183
  13. ^ Blanchard, C. (ed.) (1884), Counties of Clay and Owen, Indiana: Historical and Biographical , (Chicago: F.A. Battey & Company Publishers), pp. 880-881.
  14. ^ Eicher, J.H. & Eicher, D.J. (eds.) (2001), Civil War High Commands, (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, ISBN 0-8047-3641-3), p. 383.
  15. ^ 2005 Congressional Record, Vol. 151, Page S13510 (13 December 2005)
  16. ^ Haraburda, Scott (2013). Christian Controversies: Seeking the Truth. Meaningful Publications. ISBN 978-0-9886072-0-0. 
  17. ^ Haraburda, Scott (Winter 2007). "CBRNE Leadership Rules" (PDF). Army Chemical Review: 4–7. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  18. ^ Haraburda, Scott; Bloom, Frances; Keck, Robert (2009). "Contracting Agility in LOGCAP-Kuwait" (PDF). Army Logistician 41 (4): 3–8. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  19. ^ staff (19 October 2010). "Colonel Haraburda Retires After Nearly Three Decades Of Service; Receives Legion Of Merit". Spencer Evening World 84 (78). pp. 1, 4. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  20. ^ "Scott S. Haraburda". Hall of Valor. Military Times. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  21. ^ "ROTC Hall of Fame". Central Michigan University. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  22. ^ Loebach, Linda K. (15 March 2011). "Haraburda Inducted into ROTC Hall of Fame". United States Army. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  23. ^ Haraburda, Scott S. (July 1995). "Three-Phase Flow? Consider Helical-Coil Heat Exchangers". Chemical Engineering 102 (7): 149–151. Retrieved 23 July 2015. 
  24. ^ Haraburda, Scott (June 1992). "Developmental Research for Designing a Microwave Electrothermal Thruster". 18th Army Science Conference 2. Orlando, Florida. pp. 15–29. Retrieved 24 July 2015. 
  25. ^ Haraburda, Scott (2001). Transport phenomena of flow through helium and nitrogen plasmas in microwave electrothermal thrusters (Ph.D.). Michigan State University. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  26. ^ "Complete List of NSPE Fellows". National Society of Professional Engineers. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  27. ^ Peske, Thomas (3 July 2013). "Crane Army Employee Receives Engineering Society Honor". United States Army. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  28. ^ staff (27 May 2014). "Haraburda Named 69th President Of Society Of Professional Engineering". Spencer Evening World 87 (231). p. 1. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  29. ^ US 6516280, Haraburda, Scott; Rex Masterson & Angelika Clark et al., "Method and System for Electronic Recycle Inventory Tracking", issued 2003 
  30. ^ US 6405579, Tjahjadi, Mahari; Joseph Janssen & George Fischer et al., "Scaleless On-Line Rheometer Device", issued 2002 
  31. ^ US 2002077722, Haraburda, Scott; Rex Masterson & Angelika Clark et al., "Method and System for Electronic Tracking of Packaging", published 2002 
  32. ^ US 2002077718, Haraburda, Scott; Rex Masterson & Angelika Clark et al., "Method and System for Using Electronic Raw Material Tracking and Quality Control", published 2002 
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  34. ^ US 2002077715, Haraburda, Scott; Rex Masterson & Angelika Clark et al., "Method and System for Using Electronic Downloadable Control Plans", published 2002 
  35. ^ WO 0150209, Haraburda, Scott; Rex Masterson & Angelika Clark et al., "Method and System for Monitoring Production Data", published 2001 
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  37. ^ WO 0127795, Haraburda, Scott, "Method and System for Screen Saver Based Communications", published 2001 
  38. ^ Gressitt, Alexandra S. (reprocessed) (2 January 2002). "David Enoch Beem documents" (PDF). Manuscript Collections Department, William Henry Smith Memorial Library, Indiana Historical Society. Retrieved 26 January 2014. 
  39. ^ a b c d Heffermn, John (1955). "Hoosier Senior Naval Officers in World War II". Indiana Magazine of History 51 (2): 91–112. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  40. ^ Patterson, Michael R. "John Howard Cassady, Admiral, United States Navy". Arlingtoncemetery.net. Retrieved 2012-03-08. 
  41. ^ a b Richardson, Dixie K. (3 June 2015). "Fact & Folklore of Owen County: Spencer’s Admirals". Spencer Evening World 88 (237). p. 1. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  42. ^ "Commanders of the U.S. Navy's Sixth Fleet". U.S.S. Little Rock Association. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  43. ^ Find A Grave. "Adm John Howard Cassady". Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  44. ^ Find A Grave. "Henry Maston Mullinnix". Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  45. ^ "Joins the Fleet Today". The Boston Naval Shipyard News 22 (35). 7 March 1958. p. 1. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  46. ^ "Horace Meek Hickam, Lieutenant Colonel, United States Army Air Corps". www.arlingtoncemetery.net. Retrieved 2009-01-09. 
  47. ^ staff (6 August 2010). "Owen Valley High School Air Force JROTC Completes Fifth Year With Awards Ceremony" 84 (27). Spencer Evening World. p. 7. Retrieved 31 January 2015. 
  48. ^ staff (16 June 2011). "Owen Valley AJROTC Instructors Receive Honors, Teachers Inman & Wenzel Leaving" 84 (246). Spencer Evening World. p. 4. Retrieved 31 January 2015. 
  49. ^ Thorpe, D.R. (2010), Supermac: The Life of Harold Macmillan, (London: Chatto & Windus, ISBN 9780701177485), p. 15.
  50. ^ Coughlan, R. (9 June 1958). "The MacMillans of Sussex and Indiana: Spirited, forceful U.S. mother shaped character of Britain's leader" 44 (23). Life. pp. 126–140. 
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  52. ^ Wingate, Jennifer (2013). Sculpting Doughboys: Memory, Gender, and Taste in America's World War I Memorials. Burlinton, VT: Ashgate Publishing Company. p. 59. 
  53. ^ a b Find A Grave. "Ernest Moore "Dick" Viquesney". Retrieved 19 March 2015. 
  54. ^ staff (23 October 2009). "Tivoli Slowly Being Taken Back To Original Look From 1920's". Spencer Evening World 83 (83). p. 1. Retrieved 19 March 2015. 
  55. ^ Trout, Steven. On the Battlefield of Memory: The First World War and American Remembrance, 1919-1941. Tuscaloosa, Ala.: The University of Alambama Press. pp. 111–115. 

External links[edit]