Bellevue, Ohio

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Bellevue, Ohio
City
Downtown Bellevue, Ohio on East Main Street.
Downtown Bellevue, Ohio on East Main Street.
Motto: " Heart Of It All "
Location of Bellevue, Ohio
Location of Bellevue, Ohio
Coordinates: 41°16′33″N 82°50′32″W / 41.27583°N 82.84222°W / 41.27583; -82.84222Coordinates: 41°16′33″N 82°50′32″W / 41.27583°N 82.84222°W / 41.27583; -82.84222
Country United States
State Ohio
Counties Erie, Huron, Sandusky,[Seneca County,Ohio]]
Government
 • Mayor Donald R. Berkey
Area[1]
 • Total 6.26 sq mi (16.21 km2)
 • Land 6.14 sq mi (15.90 km2)
 • Water 0.12 sq mi (0.31 km2)
Elevation[2] 751 ft (229 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 8,202
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 8,133
 • Density 1,335.8/sq mi (515.8/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 44811
Area code(s) 419
FIPS code 39-05228[5]
GNIS feature ID 1064408[2]
Website http://www.cityofbellevue.com/

Bellevue /ˈbɛlvjuː/[6] is a city in Erie, Huron and Sandusky counties[7] in the U.S. state of Ohio. The population was 8,202 at the 2010 census. The National Arbor Day Foundation has designated Bellevue as a Tree City USA.

The Sandusky County portion of Bellevue is part of the Fremont Micropolitan Statistical Area, while the Huron County portion is part of the Norwalk Micropolitan Statistical Area. The small portion of the city that extends into Erie county is part of the Sandusky Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Bellevue was the home of Henry Morrison Flagler when he partnered up with John D. Rockefeller to start Standard Oil. Flagler later went on to build the Florida Overseas Railroad, to Key West, Florida. The property of his former Bellevue residence on Southwest Street is the current location of the Mad River & NKP Railroad Museum.

Geography[edit]

Bellevue is located at 41°16′33″N 82°50′32″W / 41.27583°N 82.84222°W / 41.27583; -82.84222 (41.275808, -82.842099).[8]

According to the 2010 census, the city has a total area of 6.25 square miles (16.2 km2), of which 6.14 square miles (15.9 km2) (or 98.24%) is land and 0.12 square miles (0.31 km2) (or 1.92%) is water.[9]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 785
1870 1,219 55.3%
1880 2,169 77.9%
1890 3,052 40.7%
1900 4,101 34.4%
1910 5,209 27.0%
1920 5,776 10.9%
1930 6,256 8.3%
1940 6,127 −2.1%
1950 6,906 12.7%
1960 8,286 20.0%
1970 8,604 3.8%
1980 8,187 −4.8%
1990 8,146 −0.5%
2000 8,193 0.6%
2010 8,202 0.1%
Est. 2012 8,133 −0.8%
Sources:[10][11][12][13][14][15][5][16]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 8,202 people, 3,296 households, and 2,148 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,335.8 inhabitants per square mile (515.8/km2). There were 3,662 housing units at an average density of 596.4 per square mile (230.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.3% White, 0.6% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.7% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.2% of the population.

There were 3,296 households of which 34.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.9% were married couples living together, 12.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 34.8% were non-families. 29.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.01.

The median age in the city was 36.5 years. 26% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.6% were from 25 to 44; 24.3% were from 45 to 64; and 14.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.9% male and 52.1% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 8,193 people, 3,332 households, and 2,242 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,619.8 people per square mile (625.2/km²). There were 3,559 housing units at an average density of 703.6 per square mile (271.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.77% White, 0.27% African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.27% Asian, 0.82% from other races, and 0.73% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.56% of the population.

There were 3,332 households out of which 32.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.2% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.7% were non-families. 27.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 8.3% from 18 to 24, 29.1% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 14.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 93.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $88,100, and the median income for a family was $98,173. Males had a median income of $76,601 versus $44,189 for females. The per capita income for the city was $58,932. About 1.3% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.5% of those under age 18 and 1% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Local high school students can attend Bellevue High School or EHOVE Career Center; there is also the option of open enrollment in neighboring public school districts. Furthermore, Catholic elementary and junior high, Immaculate Conception School (and church; Immaculate Conception Church) is available as a private school option. They recently build new elementary school, combining all the smaller schools into one, and a middle school. Due to the city's location, other high school education is available nearby at Tiffin Calvert High School in Tiffin, St. Joseph Central Catholic High School in Fremont, St. Mary Central Catholic High School in Sandusky, or St. Paul High School in Norwalk.

Media[edit]

Bellevue and the surrounding area are served by a daily newspaper, The Bellevue Gazette.[citation needed]

Transportation[edit]

Roads[edit]

Bellevue is located on U.S. Route 20, which forms East and West Main Street. State Routes 18, 269, and 113 also run through the city.

Railroad[edit]

During the first half of the 20th century, Bellevue was a busy railroad hub of the Nickel Plate Road, and it remains today as a hub for the Norfolk Southern Railway, which operates a massive railroad yard in Bellevue. From Bellevue, Norfolk Southern Lines extend northeast to Cleveland, north to Sandusky, northwest to Toledo, west to Fort Wayne, Indiana and south to Columbus. Also, the Wheeling and Lake Erie Railway operates a line from Bellevue that extends east to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch photograph of Bellevue native Bradbury Robinson, who threw the first legal forward pass in 1906

Notable residents[edit]

Jerry Burr, born and raised in Bellue, BHS Class of 1949. Was an original member of the Joffrey Ballet and has appeared in European and American television and films. Professor of Dance at the University of Akron, where he helped build the dance program. Mr. Burr trained Karen Ziemba, Broadway musical star and winner of a 2000 Tony Award

[21]

National Register of Historic Places[edit]

Bellevue and the surrounding countryside are home to three sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places: the Heter Farm, the John Wright Mansion, and the Tremont House.[22]

Rebecca Stevens, Former Historical Architect in the National Park Service at the National Capital Region of Washington DC.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Camp, Mark J. "Railroad Depots of Northwest Ohio." Chicago, Arcadia Publishing, 2005. ISBN 978-0-7385-3401-5.
  • Drown, William. "Bellevue and Historic Lyme Village (OH)." Chicago: Arcadia Publishing, 2002. ISBN 978-0-7385-2023-0.
  • Oddo, William. "Bellevue, a Pictorial History: A Historic Reflection of an Ohio Community." Genealogy Publishing Services, 2005. ISBN 978-1-881851-21-9.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ http://scrippsjschool.org/pronunciation/
  7. ^ "Voter Registration Information". City of Bellevue. Retrieved 2013-12-27. 
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  9. ^ "2010 Census U.S. Gazetteer Files for Places – Ohio". United States Census. Retrieved 2012-10-19. 
  10. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties". Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  11. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties". Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  13. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  14. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio". 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  15. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  16. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  17. ^ Coachbuilt. "Amos E. Northup, 1889-1937". Retrieved 2009-05-13. 
  18. ^ The Industrial Designers Society of America. "Amos Northup". Retrieved 2009-05-13. [dead link]
  19. ^ C. "Conneaut City Schools Memo to the U.S. Department of Justice". Retrieved 2010-05-26. 
  20. ^ Drown, p. 62
  21. ^ http://cbtbahr.wordpress.com/2008/10/04/the-measure-of-a-man/
  22. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 

External links[edit]