City with special status

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City with special status (Ukrainian: місто зі спеціальним статусом) (formerly, "city of republican subordinance")[1] refers to two of Ukraine's 27 administrative regions, which are the cities of Kiev and Sevastopol. Their administrative status is recognized in the Ukrainian Constitution in Chapter IX: Territorial Structure of Ukraine and they are governed in accordance with laws passed by Ukraine's parliament, the Verkhovna Rada.[2]

Overview[edit]

Although Kiev is the nation's capital and its own administrative region, the city also serves as the administrative center for Kiev Oblast (province). The oblast entirely surrounds the city, making it an enclave. In addition, Kiev also serves as the administrative center for the oblast's Kiev-Sviatoshyn Raion (district).

Sevastopol is also administratively separate from the Autonomous Republic of Crimea, retaining its special status from Soviet times as closed city, serving as a base for the former Soviet Black Sea Fleet. The city was home to the Ukrainian Navy as well as the Russian Black Sea Fleet, although since the Crimean crisis, both Crimea and Sevastopol were incorporated into Russia as federal subjects, a move declared illegal by both the Ukrainian government and a majority of the international community.

List of cities[edit]

ISO code[3] Name Flag Coat of arms Status Area (sq mi) Population
UA-30 City of Kiev Kiev Coat of arms of Kiev Capital of Ukraine; Administrative center of Kiev Oblast and Kiev-Sviatoshyn Raion 323.9 2,782,016
UA-40 City of Sevastopol Sevastopol Coat of arms of Sevastopol Illegally incorporated into Russia according to Ukrainian and international law 416.6 380,301

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cities with special status". Chernihiv Center for Professional Development (in Ukrainian). Retrieved 8 February 2012. 
  2. ^ Kuibida, Vasyl (18 November 2008). "The concept of reform of the administrative-territorial structure of Ukraine. Project". Kyiv Regional Center for International Relations and Business (in Ukrainian). Retrieved 7 February 2012. 
  3. ^ "Ukraine Regions". Statoids. Retrieved 7 February 2012. 

External links[edit]