Comparison of satellite buses

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This page includes a list of satellite buses, of which multiple similar artificial satellites have been, or are being, built to the same model of structural frame, propulsion, spacecraft power and intra-spacecraft communication. Only commercially available (in present or past) buses are included, thus excluding series-produced proprietary satellites operated only by their makers.

Satellite buses[edit]

Satellite bus Origin Manufacturer Maximum
Satellite Payload Mass
(kg)
Total Mass (fueled bus
plus sat payload)
(kg)
Price
(Mil US$)
Launched Status First flight Last flight Comment
A2100 United States Lockheed Martin 37[1] Operational 1996 2013 GEO
Alphabus France Thales Alenia[2] and EADS Astrium 6,550 kg[citation needed] 1 Operational 2013 Alphabus
Arkyd 100 United States Planetary Resources 11–15 kg[3][4] 0 Development[5] Arkyd 100
ATK 100 United States ATK Space Systems and Services 15 kg[6] 77 kg 5 Operational 2007 2007 used in THEMIS constellation only
ATK 200 United States ATK Space Systems and Services 200 kg[6] 573 kg 3[7] Operational 2000 2012 Formerly named, "Responsive Space Modular Bus";
ATK 500 United States ATK Space Systems and Services 500 kg[6] 0 Development 2015 MEO/GEO/HEO/GSO; formerly named, "High End Modular Bus"; planned for DARPA Phoenix[6]
ATK 700 United States ATK Space Systems and Services 1,700 kg[6] 0 Development GEO/LEO/MEO/HEO/GTO; ViviSat[8]
Ball Configurable Platform 100 United States Ball Aerospace 70 kg 180 kg 3[9] Operational 1994[9] BCP 100[10]
Ball Configurable Platform 300 United States Ball Aerospace 750 kg 3[11] Operational 1999 2009 1 payload (WIRE) failed in orbit because of insufficient attitude control
Ball Configurable Platform 2000 United States Ball Aerospace 2,200 kg 5[12] Operational 1999 2011
Ball Configurable Platform 5000 United States Ball Aerospace 2,800 kg 2 Operational 2007 2009 also WorldView-3 satellite is planned for launch in 2014
TubeSat Kit[13] United States Interorbital Systems 0.5 kg 0.75 kg 0.008[14] 0 Development LEO
CubeSat Kit[6] United States Pumpkin Inc. 1.65 kg 3 kg 0.194[15] 23 Operational 2007 2012 LEO;
Eurostar (spacecraft) France, Great Britain, EADS Astrium 6,400 kg 62 Operational 1990 GEO, models E1000,E2000,E2000+,E3000
HS-333 United States Hughes Space and Communications 54 kg[16] 560 kg[17] 8[17] Retired 1972 1979[17] GEO; first satellite series; 300 watt, 12-channel, single-antenna
I-1K India Antrix Corporation/ISRO 1,425 kg[18] 4 Operational 2002 2014
I-2K India Antrix Corporation/ISRO 1,400 kg 2,800 kg[19] 20 Operational 1992 2014 DC power up to 3KW
I-3K India Antrix Corporation/ISRO 3,460 kg[20] 5 Operational 2005 2012 DC power up to 4.5KW
I-4K India Antrix Corporation/ISRO 4,000 kg - 5,000 kg[21][22] 0 Development 2014 DC power up to 11KW
IMS 1 India Antrix Corporation/ISRO 100 kg 2 Operational 2008 2011 220 W power
IMS 2 India Antrix Corporation/ISRO 450 kg[23][24][25] 1 Operational 2013 2013 800 W power
LS-1300 United States Space Systems/Loral 5,500–6700 kg[26] 30 Operational 1984[26] 2012 GEO; previously named the FS-1300
Modular Common Spacecraft Bus United States NASA Ames Research Center 50 383+ kg[27] 4.0 1 Operational 2013 LADEE Low-cost interplanetary bus.[28]
RS-300 United States Ball Aerospace 125+ kg[29] 0 Operational
(as of 2009)
RS-300
SI-100 Korea Satrec 100 kg[30] 0 Development SI-100
SI-200 Korea Satrec 200 kg[31] 1 Operational 2009 2009 copy of RazakSAT, used in DubaiSat-1
SI-300 Korea Satrec 300 kg[32] 2 Operational 2013 2014 SI-200 with larger battery, used for Deimos-2 and DubaiSat-2
SNC-100 United States SNC Space Systems 100 kg[33]–172 kg[34] 116 kg-277 kg 9 Operational 2006 SNC-100A (OG2), SNC-100B, SNC-100C, Trailblazer was lost in launch failure
SNC-100-L1 United States SNC Space Systems 100 kg[35] 0 Development Optimized for LauncherOne[35]
Spacebus 100 France Thales Alenia Space 1,170 kg[26] 3 Unknown[36] 1981[26] 1981 GEO
Spacebus 300 France Thales Alenia Space 2,100 kg (approx.)[citation needed] 5 Retired 1987 1990 GEO
Spacebus 2000 France Thales Alenia Space 1,900 kg (approx.)[citation needed] 11 Retired 1990 1998 GEO
Spacebus 3000 France Thales Alenia Space 2,800-3200 kg (approx.)[citation needed] 27 Operational[citation needed] 1996 2010 GEO
Spacebus 4000 France Thales Alenia Space 3,000-5700 kg (approx.)[citation needed] 29 Operational[citation needed] 2005 2012 GEO
STAR-1 United States Orbital Sciences 1+ Retired 1997[37] 2001 GEO
STAR-2 (GEOStar-2) United States Orbital Sciences 500 kg 3,325 kg 33[38] Operational 2002[37] 2013 GEO, 5550 W
GEOStar-3 United States Orbital Sciences 800 kg 5,000 kg 0 Development GEO, 8000 W
SSTL-70 (Microsat-70) United Kingdom Surrey Satellite Technology 30 kg 70 kg 16 Retired 1992 2001
SSTL-100 United Kingdom Surrey Satellite Technology 15 kg 100 kg 10.0 8 Operational 2003 2012
SSTL-100LO United Kingdom Surrey Satellite Technology 100 kg[35] 0 Development Optimized for LauncherOne[35]
SSTL-150 United Kingdom Surrey Satellite Technology 50 kg 177 kg 16.5 11 Operational 2005 2014
SSTL-300 United Kingdom Surrey Satellite Technology 150 kg 300 kg 23.5 1 Operational 2011 2011
SSTL-400 (Minisat-400) United Kingdom Surrey Satellite Technology 400 kg 1 Retired 1999 1999
SSTL-600 United Kingdom Surrey Satellite Technology 200 kg 600 kg 36.0 1 Operational 2005 2005
Aprize] United States SpaceQuest, Ltd. 13 kg 1.25[39] 12 Operational 2002 2014

Legend for abbreviations in the table:


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Lockheed Martin-Built A2100 Satellite Achieves 15 Year On-Orbit Life"
  2. ^ "Alphabus development well under way". Thales Alenia Space. 2007-11-23. 
  3. ^ Heater, Bryan (2013-01-21). "Planetary Resources shows off Arkyd-100 prototype, gives a tour of its workspace". Engadget. Retrieved 2013-01-23. 
  4. ^ Mike Wall (2013-04-24). "Private Asteroid-Mining Project Launching Tiny Satellites in 2014". Space.com. Retrieved 2013-04-25. 
  5. ^ Eric Anderson (30 Aug 2012). Eric Anderson – The Arkyd Series (video interview). moonandback.com. Retrieved 2012-09-06. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f Werner, Debra (2012-08-13). "Builder Packing More Capability into Small Satellites". Space News. p. 13. 
  7. ^ http://cms.atk.com/SiteCollectionDocuments/ProductsAndServices/ATK-200-250-Data-Sheet.pdf
  8. ^ "ATK: Introducing the expanded product line of agile spacecraft buses". Space News. 2012-08-13. pp. 16–17. "ATK A100 THEMIS; ATK A200 ORS-1, TacSat3, and EO-1; ATK A500 DARPA Phoenix; ATK A700 ViviSat" 
  9. ^ a b "Ball Aerospace Configurable Platforms". Product Brochure. Ball Aerospace. 2014-01. Retrieved 2014-04-09.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  10. ^ "Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM)". Ball Aerospace. 2014. Retrieved 2014-02-26. 
  11. ^ http://www.ballaerospace.com/file/media/D1920_BCP%20SC_01_14_2.pdf
  12. ^ http://www.ballaerospace.com/file/media/D1920_BCP%20SC_01_14_2.pdf
  13. ^ http://www.interorbital.com/interorbital_03302014_002.htm
  14. ^ http://www.interorbital.com/Downloads/TubeSat%20Sales%20Brochure%20Publish%202.0.pdf
  15. ^ http://www.pumpkininc.com/content/doc/forms/pricelist.pdf
  16. ^ Hughes Aircraft Corporation, Space and Communications Group, SBS F6 Prime sales brochure, 1985
  17. ^ a b c Krebs, Gunter. "Hughes: HS-333 / HS-356". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 4 July 2012. 
  18. ^ "SPACECRAFT SYSTEMS AND SUB SYSTEMS". Antrix Corporation. Retrieved 2013-02-02. 
  19. ^ "SPACECRAFT SYSTEMS AND SUB SYSTEMS". Antrix Corporation. Retrieved 2013-02-02. 
  20. ^ "SPACECRAFT SYSTEMS AND SUB SYSTEMS". Antrix Corporation. Retrieved 2013-02-02. 
  21. ^ http://www.sac.gov.in/SACSITE/GSAT-11.html
  22. ^ http://www.isro.org/scripts/futureprogramme.aspx
  23. ^ http://www.isro.org/satellites/ims-1.aspx
  24. ^ http://www.isro.org/satellites/saral.aspx
  25. ^ http://www.isro.org/newsletters/contents/nnrms/NNRMS%20Bulletin%202013.pdf
  26. ^ a b c d "Space Service Loral (SSL): LS-1300". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2012-08-25. 
  27. ^ Graham, William (2013-09-06). [Category:Derelict satellites orbiting Earth "Orbital’s Minotaur V launches LADEE mission to the Moon"]. NASAspaceflight.com. Retrieved 2013-09-07. 
  28. ^ NASA Lunar Science Institute, Common Spacecraft Bus for Lunar Explorer Missions, includes video.
  29. ^ Krebs, Gunter. "Ball: RS-300". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  30. ^ Wade, Mark. "Satrec". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved 2012-09-16. 
  31. ^ Krebs, Gunter (2012-02-09). "Satrec Initiative: SI-200". Skyrocket.de (Gunter's Space Page). Retrieved 2012-09-16. 
  32. ^ "Satellite System Products". Satrec Initiative. 2012. Retrieved 2012-09-16. 
  33. ^ "SN-100 Small Satellite Production Line". Space News. 2012-08-13. p. 21. "first 18 satellites [are] in production" 
  34. ^ Graham, William (2014-07-14). "SpaceX’s Falcon 9 set for fourth attempt to launch Orbcomm OG2 mission". NASAspaceflight.com. Retrieved 2014-07-14. 
  35. ^ a b c d "Virgin Galactic relaunches its smallsat launch business". NewSpace Journal. 2012-07-12. Retrieved 2012-08-25. "develop versions of their smallsat bus optimized to the design of LauncherOne."" 
  36. ^ Harland, David M; Lorenz, Ralph D. (2005). Space Systems Failures (2006 ed.). Chichester: Springer-Praxis. p. 221. ISBN 0-387-21519-0. 
  37. ^ a b "GEOStar Brochure". Orbital Sciences. 2012. Retrieved 2013-09-20. 
  38. ^ http://www.orbital.com/SatelliteSpaceSystems/Publications/GEOStar-2_factsheet.pdf
  39. ^ http://www.astronautix.com/craft/aprzesat.htm

Notes[edit]

It is not clear from the sources if the Spacebus 100 satellite bus is still on offer.