Democratic Party presidential candidates, 2012

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Democratic Party presidential candidates, 2012
United States
2008 ←
Democratic primaries
January 3 to June 5, 2012

→ 2016

  Barack Obama (April 2012).jpg John Wolfe, Jr.jpg
Candidate Barack Obama John Wolfe, Jr.
Party Democratic Democratic
Home state Illinois Tennessee
States carried 50+DC 0
Popular vote 7,376,659 116,639
Percentage 90.24% 1.43%

President before election

Barack Obama

Democratic nominee

Barack Obama

During the 2012 United States presidential election, 51 individuals sought the nomination of the Democratic Party. Incumbent President Barack Obama won the nomination unanimously at the 2012 Democratic National Convention and was re-elected as President in the general election.

As expected for the incumbent president, Obama won every primary election, but faced more difficulty than projected. Fifteen additional candidates appeared on primary ballots, and of these, four appeared on more than one ballot. Four qualified for convention delegates including: attorney John Wolfe, Jr., prison inmate Keith Russell Judd, perennial candidate Jim Rogers, and pro-life activist Randall Terry. Each of these had their delegates stripped prior to the convention due to technicalities.

Thirty-six additional candidates filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to run for President, but either withdrew from the race before the primaries or did not appear on any primary ballots. Several other Democrats were speculated to make a run, but decided against doing so.

Candidates[edit]

The following individuals formally announced their campaigns for the Democratic Party presidential nomination in 2012 and/or filed as a candidate for such with the Federal Election Commission (FEC).

Incumbent[edit]

Candidate Background Campaign notes Ballot access & vote total
President Barack Obama, 2012 portrait crop.jpg

President Barack Obama
(Website)
(FEC filing)

  • Formally announced his re-election bid via his website on April 4, 2011.[1]
  • Surpassed the required 2778 delegates to secure the Democratic Party presidential nomination with victories in the Maryland and District of Columbia primaries.[2]
  • Unanimously received the party's nomination at the 2012 Democratic National Convention,[3] with all challengers having been stripped of any delegates earned.[4]
  • Vice President Joe Biden was selected as his running mate.
  • Won re-election over former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney in the general election.[5]
Obama Ballot Access.PNG
Appeared on all primary ballots
7,376,659 (90.24 percent overall)[6]

Challengers[edit]

On multiple primary ballots[edit]

The following candidates appeared on more than one primary ballot.

Candidate Background Campaign notes Ballot access & vote total
John Wolfe on Lesser-Known Presidential Candidates Forum crop.jpg

John Wolfe, Jr.
(Website)
(FEC filing)
(Wikinews)

  • Declared his candidacy in late 2011.[7]
  • Participated in the lesser-known candidates forum.[8]
  • Paid at least $1,000 for ballot access.[7][9][10]
  • Won 12 percent of the vote in Louisiana, and qualified for three delegates,[11] which the Louisiana Democratic Party stripped due to his lack of a delegate slate.[12]
  • Had the strongest showing for an Obama challenger with 42 percent of the vote in Arkansas,[6][13] qualifying for 19 delegates,[14] which the Arkansas Democratic Party stripped due to his lack of a delegate slate.
  • Unsuccessfully sued the Democratic Party to regain the stripped delegates.
Wolfe Ballot Access.PNG
NH, MO, LA, AR, TX
116,639 (1.43 percent overall)[6]
LG PICs 2 002.JPG

Darcy Richardson
(Website)
(FEC filing)
(Wikinews)

  • Announced his candidacy October 26, 2011.[15]
  • Paid $8,125 for ballot access.[16]
  • Had his strongest showing in the Oklahoma primary, where he won 6.36 percent of the total.
  • Suspended his campaign in April 2012 prior to the Texas primary.[17]
Richardson Ballot Access.PNG
NH,[18] MO, OK, LA, TX
41,730 (0.51 percent overall)[6]

Bob Ely
(Website)
(FEC filing)
(Wikinews)

  • Born 1958
  • Entrepreneur from Illinois
  • Interim CEO of PayDQ Services, 2001
  • Owner of The Canton Press-News Journal, 2010–present
  • Created his campaign website and filed with FEC on November 28, 2011.[19]
  • Paid at least $4,500 for ballot access.[20]
  • Had his strongest showing in Louisiana, where he won 6.57 percent of the vote.[21]
Ely Ballot Access.PNG
NH, LA, OK, TX
29,947 (0.37 percent overall)[6]
Randall Terry at forum crop.jpg

Randall Terry
(Website)
(FEC filing)

  • Announced his candidacy in January 2011.[23][24][25]
  • Paid at least $3,500 for ballot access.[26][27]
  • Participated in the lesser-known candidates forum.[8]
  • Unsuccessfully attempted to run a campaign advertisement depicting photos of aborted fetuses during Super Bowl XLVI.[23][24]
  • Had his strongest showing in Oklahoma, where he received 18 percent of the vote, and qualified for seven delegates,[28] which the Oklahoma Democratic Party stripped due to his lack of a delegate slate.[29]
  • Continued his campaign as an Independent and appeared on the general election ballots in Kentucky, Nebraska, and West Virginia, receiving 13,112 votes.[30]
Terry Ballot Access.PNG
NH, MO, OK
22,734 (0.28 percent overall)[6]

On one primary ballot[edit]

The following candidates appeared on only one primary ballot.

Candidate Background Campaign notes Ballot access & vote total

Keith Russell Judd
(FEC filing)

  • Born 1958
  • Prison inmate serving a 210 month sentence at the Beaumont Federal Correctional Institution in Texas.[31][32]
  • Democratic Party and Green Party presidential candidate, 2008[33]
  • Paid $2,500 to appear on the West Virginia ballot.[34]
  • Won 41 percent of the vote in West Virginia for second place,[6][35][36][37] qualifying him for several delegates, which the West Virginia Democratic Party stripped due to his lack of a delegate slate.[38]
  • Filed with the FEC to run as an Independent candidate on October 10, 2012.[39]
Map of USA WV.svg
WV
73,138 (0.89 percent overall)[6]

Jim Rogers
(FEC filing)

  • Born 1935
  • Perennial political candidate from Oklahoma[40][41]
  • Democratic Party presidential candidate, 2008
  • U.S. Senate nominee for the Democratic Party in Oklahoma, 2010
  • Filed with the FEC to run for president on December 12, 2011.[42]
  • Paid $2,500 to appear on the Oklahoma ballot.[43]
  • Finished third with 13.79 percent in Oklahoma,[6][28] qualifying him for three delegates, which the Oklahoma Democratic Party stripped due to his lack of a delegate slate.[29]
Map of USA OK.svg
OK
15,535 (0.19 percent overall)[6]
Ed Cowan 2.jpg

Ed Cowan
(Website)

  • Paid $1,000 to appear on the New Hampshire ballot.[7]
  • Participated in the lesser-known candidates forum[8]
  • Finished second among ballot candidates in New Hampshire with 1.56 percent.[45]
Map of USA NH.svg
NH
945 (0.01 percent overall)[6]
Vermin Supreme 2012.jpg

Vermin Supreme
(Website)

  • Born 1961
  • Performance artist and perennial candidate from Massachusetts[46][47]
  • Democratic Party presidential candidate, 2004
  • Republican Party presidential candidate, 2008 [33]
  • Ran as a satirical candidate.
  • Paid $1,000 to appear on the New Hampshire ballot.[7]
  • Glitter bombed Randall Terry during the lesser-known candidates forum.[48]
  • Finished third among ballot candidates in New Hampshire with 1.37 percent
Map of USA NH.svg
NH
833 (0.01 percent overall)[6]
John D. Haywood on Lesser-Known Presidential Candidates Forum.jpg

John D. Haywood
(FEC filing), (Website)

  • Filed with the FEC to run for president on October 27, 2011.[50]
  • Paid $1,000 to appear on the New Hampshire ballot.[7]
  • Participated in the lesser-known candidates forum[8]
  • Finished fifth among ballot candidates in New Hampshire with 0.7 percent.[45]
Map of USA NH.svg
NH
423 (0.01 percent overall)[6]

Craig "Tax Freeze" Freis

  • Paid $1,000 to appear on the New Hampshire ballot.[7]
  • Successfully lobbied the New Hampshire Ballot Law Commission to have his legal middle name of "Tax Freeze" listed on the ballot.[52]
  • Finished sixth among ballot candidates in New Hampshire with 0.66 percent.[45]
Map of USA NH.svg
NH
400 (0.00 percent overall)[6]

Cornelius O'Connor

  • From Florida
  • Republican Party presidential candidate, 2008[33]
  • Paid $1,000 to appear on the New Hampshire ballot.[7]
  • Finished eighth among ballot candidates in New Hampshire with 0.44 percent.[45]
Map of USA NH.svg
NH
266 (0.00 percent overall)[6]
Edward O'Donnell, Jr Lesser Known Candidates Forum.jpg

Ed O'Donnell

  • Paid $1,000 to appear on the New Hampshire ballot.[7]
  • Participated in the lesser-known candidates forum.[8]
  • Finished eleventh among ballot candidates in New Hampshire with 0.37 percent.[45]
Map of USA NH.svg
NH
222 (0.00 percent overall)[6]
Bob Greene.jpg

Bob Greene
(FEC filing), (Website)

  • Filed with the FEC to run for president on December 13, 2011[54]
  • Paid $1,000 to appear on the New Hampshire ballot.[7]
  • Participated in the lesser-known candidates forum.[8]
  • Finished twelfth among ballot candidates in New Hampshire with 0.35 percent.[45]
Map of USA NH.svg
NH
213 (0.00 percent overall)[6]

Robert B. Jordan
(FEC filing), (Website)

  • From California
  • Filed with the FEC to run for president on August 22, 2011.[55]
  • Paid $1,000 to appear on the New Hampshire ballot.[7]
  • Finished thirteenth among ballot candidates in New Hampshire with 0.26 percent.[45]
Map of USA NH.svg
NH
155 (0.00 percent overall)[6]

Aldous Tyler
(FEC filing), (Website)

  • Radio host from Wisconsin[56]
  • Host of the WSUM radio show TMI with Aldous Tyler, 2010–present
  • Filed with the FEC to run for president on September 20, 2011.[57]
  • Paid $1,000 to appear on the New Hampshire ballot.[7]
  • Endorsed Darcy Richardson before the New Hampshire primary.[58]
  • Finished fourteenth among ballot candidates in New Hampshire with 0.17 percent.[45]
Map of USA NH.svg
NH
106 (0.00 percent overall)[6]

FEC-filed candidates[edit]

The following presidential candidates filed with the FEC, but either did not appear on any primary ballots or withdrew before the primary elections.

Candidate Background Campaign notes
Jeff Boss.jpg

Jeff Boss
(Website)
(FEC filing)

  • Born 1963 [59]
  • Conspiracy theorist from New Jersey
  • "Vote Here" presidential nominee, 2008
  • Declared his candidacy with the FEC in July 2009.[60]
  • Based his campaign on the claim that he witnessed the National Security Agency (NSA) orchestrate the September 11 attacks.[61]
  • Amended his FEC filing in March 2012 to change his party affiliation to Independent.[62]
  • Appeared on the general ballot in New Jersey as the "NSA did 9/11" candidate and received 1,024 votes.[63]
Warren Mosler.jpg

Warren Mosler
(Website)
(FEC filing)

  • Declared his candidacy with the FEC in February 2009.[64]
  • Ran as a Tea Party Democrat[65]
  • Withdrew his candidacy in April 2010[66] to run for U.S. Senate in Connecticut.[65]

Speculated[edit]

The following individuals were the object of presidential speculation in past media reports, but did not signal an interest in running.

Declined to run[edit]

The following individuals speculated to run for the Democratic Party's 2012 presidential nomination, announced they would not run.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Condon, Stephanie (April 4, 2011). "Obama launches 2012 campaign with web video". CBS News. Retrieved June 24, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Obama clinches Democratic nomination". cnn.com. April 3, 2012. Retrieved April 3, 2012. 
  3. ^ Becker, Bernie; Jonathan Easley (September 6, 2012). "Democrats officially nominate Obama". The Hill. Retrieved June 24, 2013. 
  4. ^ Tau, Byron (September 3, 2012). "Convention vote expected to be unanimous for Obama". Politico. Retrieved June 24, 2013. 
  5. ^ Barabak, Mark Z. (November 7, 2012). "Obama wins a second term". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 7, 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s "Democratic Convention 2012". The Green Papers. Retrieved June 24, 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Carroll, Chris (December 20, 2011). "Chattanooga man John Wolfe running for president in New Hampshire". Chattanooga Times Free Press. Retrieved March 29, 2012. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f "Lesser known candidates forum". Wikinews. January 1, 2012. Retrieved May 24, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Elections: 2012 Presidential Preference Primary in Missouri (Candidate Filing Information)". Missouri Secretary of State. Retrieved June 30, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Texas Democratic Presidential Primary Ballot Has Three Candidates So Far". Ballot Access News. December 15, 2011. Retrieved June 30, 2013. 
  11. ^ Tilove, Jonathan (March 27, 2012). "Democratic challenger to Barack Obama picks off delegates in Louisiana". The Times-Picayune. Retrieved March 29, 2012. 
  12. ^ Tilove, Jonathan (April 23, 2012). "President Obama will clinch renomination Tuesday, but it may not be unanimous". The Times-Picayune. Retrieved May 23, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Election Map 2012: Live Voting Results". Politico. Retrieved May 23, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Arkansas Democratic Delegation 2012". The Green Papers. Retrieved May 23, 2012. 
  15. ^ Richardson, Darcy (October 26, 2011). "‘Why I’m Running for President’". Battleground Blog. Retrieved May 23, 2012. 
  16. ^ "Darcy Richardson For President Committee FEC filing". FEC. Retrieved June 30, 2013. 
  17. ^ "Darcy Richardson suspends Democratic Party presidential campaign". Wikinews. April 28, 2012. Retrieved May 23, 2012. 
  18. ^ Memoli, Michael A. (October 28, 2011). "Even Democratic ballot will be crowded in New Hampshire primary". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 4, 2011. 
  19. ^ "Bob Ely FEC filing". FEC. Retrieved June 30, 2013. 
  20. ^ "Bob Ely For President Committee FEC filing". FEC. Retrieved June 30, 2013. 
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  22. ^ "Operation Rescue". Montana Human Rights Network. Retrieved May 23, 2012. 
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  29. ^ a b "On the campaign trail, March 2012". Wikinews. April 4, 2012. Retrieved May 23, 2012. 
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  31. ^ "Keith Russell Judd: Would-be Presidential candidate sits in a Beaumont prison". Beaumont Enterprise. July 6, 2011. Retrieved April 6, 2012. 
  32. ^ Asbury, Kyla (July 6, 2011). "Texas prisoner says he should be on 2012 ballot". West Virginia Record. Retrieved April 6, 2012. 
  33. ^ a b c "2008 Presidential Hopefuls Grouped By Party". The Green Papers. Retrieved June 28, 2013. 
  34. ^ Porterfield, Mannix (March 27, 2012). "Texas convict on W.Va. ballot for president". The Register-Herald. Retrieved April 6, 2012. 
  35. ^ "Hail to the chief! Beaumont "resident" on the ballot in West Virginia". Beaumont Enterprise. March 27, 2012. Retrieved April 6, 2012. 
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  38. ^ Tilove, Jonathan (May 11, 2012). "Keith Judd joins presidential candidates losing delegates they 'won'". The Times-Picayune. Retrieved May 24, 2012. 
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  41. ^ "Election 2012". Tulsa World. Retrieved February 15, 2012. 
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  43. ^ McNutt, Michael (December 9, 2011). "Oklahoma elections: Fifth Democrat added to state's presidential primary". The Oklahoman. Retrieved June 30, 2013. 
  44. ^ "Ed Cowan Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  45. ^ a b c d e f g h "New Hampshire Democratic Delegation". The Green Papers. Retrieved May 24, 2012. 
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  49. ^ "John Haywood Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  50. ^ "John Haywood FEC filing". FEC. Retrieved June 30, 2013. 
  51. ^ "Craig Freis Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
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  54. ^ "Bob Greene FEC filing". FEC. Retrieved June 30, 2013. 
  55. ^ "Robert Jordan FEC filing". FEC. Retrieved June 30, 2013. 
  56. ^ "Aldous Tyler Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved June 28, 2013. 
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  76. ^ Nelson, Steven (November 11, 2011). "Former Senate candidate Alvin Greene no longer running for president". The Daily Caller. Retrieved November 12, 2011. 
  77. ^ Stephanopoulos, George (August 10, 2010). "Rep. Kucinich Won’t Challenge Obama in Primary". ABC News. Retrieved June 27, 2013. 
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External links[edit]