Knowlton Township, New Jersey

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Knowlton Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Knowlton
An old barn in Knowlton Township
An old barn in Knowlton Township
Map of Knowlton Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County in New Jersey.
Map of Knowlton Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Knowlton Township, New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Knowlton Township, New Jersey.
Coordinates: 40°55′45″N 75°03′42″W / 40.929261°N 75.061796°W / 40.929261; -75.061796Coordinates: 40°55′45″N 75°03′42″W / 40.929261°N 75.061796°W / 40.929261; -75.061796[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Warren
Royal charter February 23, 1763
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Named for Thomas Knowlton
Government[4]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Ronald Farber (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Clerk Lisa Patton[3]
Area[2]
 • Total 25.329 sq mi (65.602 km2)
 • Land 24.749 sq mi (64.100 km2)
 • Water 0.580 sq mi (1.503 km2)  2.29%
Area rank 105th of 566 in state
5th of 22 in county[2]
Elevation[5] 528 ft (161 m)
Population (2010 Census)[6][7][8]
 • Total 3,055
 • Estimate (2012[9]) 3,016
 • Rank 449th of 566 in state
14th of 22 in county[10]
 • Density 123.4/sq mi (47.6/km2)
 • Density rank 533rd of 566 in state
18th of 22 in county[10]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07825 - Blairstown[11]
07832 - Columbia[12]
07833 - Delaware[13]
Area code(s) 908
FIPS code 3404137320[14][2][15]
GNIS feature ID 0882241[16]
Website www.knowlton-nj.com

Knowlton Township is a township in Warren County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 3,055,[6][7][8] reflecting an increase of 78 (+2.6%) from the 2,977 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 434 (+17.1%) from the 2,543 counted in the 1990 Census.[17]

Knowlton Township was created by Royal charter on February 23, 1763, from portions of Oxford Township, while the area was still part of Sussex County, and was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, and then became part of the newly created Warren County on November 20, 1824. Portions of the township were taken to form Hope Township (April 8, 1839) and Blairstown Township (April 14, 1845).[18]

Columbia (with a 2010 Census population of 229[19]), Delaware (150[20]) and Hainesburg (91[21]) are census-designated places (CDPs) and unincorporated areas located within the township.[22][23][24]

Knowlton is named after Thomas Knowlton, a Colonel in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War who was killed in action at the Battle of Harlem Heights.[25] The township is served by postal ZIP codes in Columbia (07832) and Delaware (07833), although a small number of Knowlton residents receive postal deliveries via the Blairstown (07825) post office. Within the township are several small hamlets, including Browning, Deckers Ferry, Mount Pleasant, Polkville, Ramseyburg, Warrington and Knowlton itself.[26]

Geography[edit]

Knowlton Township is located at 40°55′45″N 75°03′42″W / 40.929261°N 75.061796°W / 40.929261; -75.061796 (40.929261,-75.061796). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 25.329 square miles (65.602 km2), of which, 24.749 square miles (64.100 km2) of it is land and 0.580 square miles (1.503 km2) of it (2.29%) is water.[1][2] The township is located in the Kittatinny Valley which is a section of the Great Appalachian Valley that stretches 700 miles (1,100 km) from Canada to Alabama.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 2,064
1820 2,701 30.9%
1830 2,827 4.7%
1840 2,310 * −18.3%
1850 1,356 * −41.3%
1860 1,557 14.8%
1870 1,691 8.6%
1880 1,476 −12.7%
1890 1,411 −4.4%
1900 1,210 −14.2%
1910 1,556 28.6%
1920 1,073 −31.0%
1930 1,049 −2.2%
1940 1,084 3.3%
1950 1,260 16.2%
1960 1,442 14.4%
1970 1,738 20.5%
1980 2,074 19.3%
1990 2,543 22.6%
2000 2,977 17.1%
2010 3,055 2.6%
Est. 2012 3,016 [9] −1.3%
Population sources:
1810-1920[27] 1840[28] 1850-1870[29]
1850[30] 1870[31] 1880-1890[32]
1890-1910[33] 1910-1930[34]
1930-1990[35] 2000[36][37] 2010[6][7][8]
* = Lost territory in previous decade[18]

The Township's economic data (as is all of Warren County) is calculated by the US Census Bureau as part of the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Census 2010[edit]

The Portland-Columbia Pedestrian Bridge replaced the last of the covered bridges spanning the Delaware River in this photo facing towards New Jersey. The original covered bridge was destroyed by the remnants of Hurricane Diane on August 19, 1955, a storm that caused record flooding throughout the region, but particularly within the watershed of the Delaware.

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 3,055 people, 1,097 households, and 864.4 families residing in the township. The population density was 123.4 per square mile (47.6 /km2). There were 1,212 housing units at an average density of 49.0 per square mile (18.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 96.07% (2,935) White, 0.92% (28) Black or African American, 0.29% (9) Native American, 0.92% (28) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.75% (23) from other races, and 1.05% (32) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.63% (111) of the population.[6]

There were 1,097 households, of which 33.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.5% were married couples living together, 8.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.2% were non-families. 16.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.10.[6]

In the township, 23.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 20.2% from 25 to 44, 36.8% from 45 to 64, and 12.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.8 years. For every 100 females there were 101.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.1 males.[6]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $81,346 (with a margin of error of +/- $11,792) and the median family income was $86,708 (+/- $13,339). Males had a median income of $76,733 (+/- $8,158) versus $51,757 (+/- $3,961) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $35,440 (+/- $4,605). About 1.4% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.1% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over.[38]

Census 2000[edit]

Ramsayburg Homestead, listed on the National Register of Historic Places

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 2,977 people, 1,028 households, and 816 families residing in the township. The population density was 120.1 people per square mile (46.4/km²). There were 1,135 housing units at an average density of 45.8 per square mile (17.7/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 97.45% White, 0.40% African American, 0.07% Native American, 0.64% Asian, 0.47% from other races, and 0.97% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.85% of the population.[36][37]

There were 1,028 households out of which 40.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.1% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.6% were non-families. 15.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.87 and the average family size was 3.21.[36][37]

Knowlton Township's rural character is evident in this view of the Delaware Water Gap from Linaberry Road.

In the township the population was spread out with 27.6% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 31.3% from 25 to 44, 24.1% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 101.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.0 males.[36][37]

The median income for a household in the township was $63,409, and the median income for a family was $72,130. Males had a median income of $46,250 versus $35,326 for females. The per capita income for the township was $24,631. About 1.5% of families and 3.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.2% of those under age 18 and 1.3% of those age 65 or over.[36][37]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

The former Hainesburg Inn (presently Animal Mansion, a veterinary hospital) on Route 94 is considered by many to be the signature piece of architecture in Knowlton. Local legend has it that the third floor is haunted by the ghost of a young boy.

Knowlton Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[4] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2014, the Knowlton Township Committee consists of Mayor Ronald Farber (R, term on committee and as mayor ends December 31, 2014), Deputy Mayor Kathy Cuntala (R, 2015), René Mathez (D, 2016), Scott Odorizzi (R, 2014) and M. Adele Starrs (R, 2016).[3][39][40][41][42]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

The annual Halloween bonfire at Smitty's in Delaware draws a large percentage of Knowlton's 3,000 residents.

Knowlton Township is located in the 5th Congressional District[43] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[7][44][45] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Knowlton Township had been in the 23rd state legislative district.[46]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[47] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[48][49] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[50][51]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Alison Littell McHose (R, Franklin) and Parker Space (R, Wantage Township).[52][53] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[54] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[55]

Warren County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose three members are chosen at-large on a staggered basis in partisan elections with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Freeholder Director and other as Deputy Director. As of 2014, Warren County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Edward J. Smith (R, Asbury / Franklin Township, 2015), Freeholder Deputy Director Richard D. Gardner (R, Asbury / Franklin Township, 2014) and Freeholder Jason Sarnoski (R, Lopatcong Township, 2016).[56] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Patricia J. Kolb (Blairstown Township),[57] Sheriff David Gallant (Blairstown Township) and Surrogate Kevin O'Neill (Hackettstown).[58][59] The County Administrator, Steve Marvin, is responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operation of the county and its departments.[60]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,008 registered voters in Knowlton Township, of which 418 (20.8% vs. 21.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 694 (34.6% vs. 35.3%) were registered as Republicans and 895 (44.6% vs. 43.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There as one voter registered to another party.[61] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 65.7% (vs. 62.3% in Warren County) were registered to vote, including 85.7% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 81.5% countywide).[61][62]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 833 votes here (63.1% vs. 56.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 441 votes (33.4% vs. 40.8%) and other candidates with 19 votes (1.4% vs. 1.7%), among the 1,320 ballots cast by the township's 2,027 registered voters, for a turnout of 65.1% (vs. 66.7% in Warren County).[63][64] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 918 votes here (63.0% vs. 55.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 491 votes (33.7% vs. 41.4%) and other candidates with 25 votes (1.7% vs. 1.6%), among the 1,457 ballots cast by the township's 2,045 registered voters, for a turnout of 71.2% (vs. 73.4% in Warren County).[65] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 948 votes here (65.8% vs. 61.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 469 votes (32.5% vs. 37.2%) and other candidates with 17 votes (1.2% vs. 1.3%), among the 1,441 ballots cast by the township's 1,899 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.9% (vs. 76.3% in the whole county).[66]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 595 votes here (63.8% vs. 61.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 203 votes (21.8% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 102 votes (10.9% vs. 9.8%) and other candidates with 13 votes (1.4% vs. 1.5%), among the 932 ballots cast by the township's 1,987 registered voters, yielding a 46.9% turnout (vs. 49.6% in the county).[67]

Education[edit]

Children in Kindergarten through sixth grade for public school attend Knowlton Township Elementary School as part of the Knowlton Township School District.[68] As of the 2010-11 school year, the district and its one school had a total enrollment of 281 students and 26.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.52:1.[69]

Students in public school for seventh through twelfth grades attend the North Warren Regional High School in Blairstown, a public secondary high school, serving students from the townships of Blairstown, Frelinghuysen, Hardwick and Knowlton.[68][70][71]

Students from the township and from all of Warren County are eligible to attend Ridge and Valley Charter School in Frelinghuysen Township (for grades K-8, with Knowlton students among those given admission preference)[72] or Warren County Technical School in Washington borough (for 9-12),[73] with special education services provided by local districts supplemented throughout the county by the Warren County Special Services School District in Oxford Township (for PreK-12).[74][68]

Recreation[edit]

Tunnel Field is the primary recreational site in the township with several baseball and softball diamonds and soccer fields. Tunnel also has a play area (including swings and play area), a basketball court and concession stand. The field is located by Route 94 and is divided by the Lackawanna Cut-Off and is connected through an old tunnel (hence the name).

Transportation history[edit]

The Brugler Road bridge crosses the bucolic Paulins Kill.
Sequestered in the woods near Hainesburg is the Paulinskill Viaduct along the Lackawanna Cut-Off, the former main line of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad in Knowlton Township. The Viaduct is 115 feet (35 m) tall and 1,100 feet (335 m) long, and was the largest reinforced concrete structure in the world when it was completed in 1910. It is also known as the Hainesburg Viaduct.

Much of Knowlton's development after 1850 can be traced to the presence of the five railroad lines that criss-crossed the township: the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad's Old Road and, later, the Lackawanna Cut-Off; the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway; the Lehigh & New England Railroad; and the Blairstown Railway. In subsequent years, all of these rail lines have been abandoned. In their heyday, however, two rail lines and three railroads served the town of Delaware: the New York, Susquehanna and Western (formerly Blairstown) Railway; and the Old Road of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad (which also had granted trackage rights to the Pennsylvania Railroad, technically a sixth railroad). The community of Columbia was also served by the NYS&W (Hainesburg also had a station), with the Lehigh and New England Railroad also passing through town.

In more recent years, development within Knowlton has been tied to the presence of U.S. Route 46 and, since the early 1970s, Interstate 80. Many Knowlton residents use Route 80 to commute to their jobs either further east in New Jersey or further west in Pennsylvania. Route 94 crosses through the township. Two bridges cross the Delaware River, connecting the township to Pennsylvania; the Portland–Columbia Toll Bridge, opened in 1953, connects Route 94 to Pennsylvania Route 611 in Portland, Pennsylvania.[75] The two places are also connected by the Portland–Columbia Pedestrian Bridge, which dates back to a structure constructed in 1869 and was dedicated for pedestrian use when the vehicular toll bridge was completed in 1953.[76]

Wineries[edit]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Knowlton Township include:

References[edit]

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  2. ^ a b c d e Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  3. ^ a b c Directory, Township of Knowlton. Accessed January 27, 2014. As of date accessed, Scott Odorizzi is omitted and René Mathez is listed with a 2013 term-end year.
  4. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 103.
  5. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Knowlton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  6. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Knowlton township, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 11. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Knowlton township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
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  11. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Blairstown, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Columbia, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Delaware, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  14. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 28, 2012.
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  19. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Columbia CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  20. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Delaware CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  21. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Hainesburg CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  22. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
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  68. ^ a b c Municipal Guide to Public School Districts, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2013.
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  71. ^ Home Page, North Warren Regional School District. Accessed September 12, 2013. "The North Warren Regional School District is home to just under 1100 students from the communities of Blairstown, Frelinghuysen, Hardwick, and Knowlton. The district stretches almost 97 square miles from the Sussex County border to the Delaware River and the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area."
  72. ^ Overview, Ridge and Valley Charter School. Accessed September 12, 2013. "Enrollment is open to any child in New Jersey, with preference for students from the districts of Blairstown, Frelinghuysen, Hardwick, Knowlton and North Warren Regional."
  73. ^ About Us, Warren County Technical School. Accessed September 12, 2013.
  74. ^ About, Warren County Special Services School District. Accessed September 12, 2013.
  75. ^ Portland-Columbia Toll Bridge, Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission. Accessed June 6, 2013. "Opened to traffic on December 1, 1953, the main river bridge consists of a ten-span steel girder system with total length of 1,309 feet and a 32-foot curb-to-curb width."
  76. ^ Portland-Columbia Toll Supported Pedestrian Bridge, Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission. Accessed June 6, 2013. "The original structure, constructed in 1869 as a vehicular bridge, was a four-span timber bridge reinforced with wooden arches."
  77. ^ Philip Johnson, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed October 11, 2007.

External links[edit]