List of New Mexico state parks

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USA New Mexico location map.svg
Map of State Parks of New Mexico
Hold cursor over locations to display park name;
click to go to park article.

This is a list of state parks and reserves in the New Mexico state park system. The system began with the establishment of Bottomless Lakes State Park on November 18, 1933.[1] New Mexico currently has 35 state parks. It has been calculated that 70% of the state's population lives within 40 miles (64 km) of a New Mexico state park.[2] The system as a whole saw 4.5 million visitors in 2009.[2] The parks are managed by the New Mexico State Parks Division of the New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department. The mission of the State Parks Division is to "protect and enhance natural and cultural resources, provide first-class recreational and education facilities and opportunities, and promote public safety to benefit and enrich the lives of visitors."[3]

Park name County or counties Area[4] Elevation[4] Date
established
[5]
Remarks
acres ha ft m
Bluewater Lake State Park Cibola 3,000 1,200 7,400 2,300 1937 Encircles a 1,200-acre (490 ha) reservoir in the Zuni Mountains.[6]
Bottomless Lakes State Park Chaves 1,400 570 3,500 1,100 1933 Encompasses eight cenotes whose greenish-blue water disguises their true depth.[7]
Brantley Lake State Park Eddy 3,000 1,200 3,300 1,000 1989 Features New Mexico's southernmost lake, a 4,000-acre (1,600 ha) reservoir on the Pecos River.[8]
Caballo Lake State Park Sierra 5,384 2,179 4,100 1,200 1964 Surrounds Caballo Lake, a 11,500-acre (4,700 ha) reservoir on the Rio Grande.[9]
Cerrillos Hills State Park Santa Fe 1,116 452 2009 Provides day-use recreation amidst 1,100 years of mining history.[10]
Cimarron Canyon State Park Colfax 378 153 7,500 2,300 1979 Showcases the canyon of the Cimarron River and the Palisades Sill formation.[11]
City of Rocks State Park Grant 1,230 500 5,250 1,600 1953 Features rock formations eroded out of 35-million-year-old volcanic ash, and a public observatory.[12]
Clayton Lake State Park Union 471 191 5,040 1,540 1965 Features a 170-acre (69 ha) reservoir and an extensive fossil trackway of dinosaur footprints.[13]
Conchas Lake State Park San Miguel 359 145[14] 4,200 1,300 1955 Adjoins a 16,400-acre (6,600 ha) reservoir on the Canadian River.[15]
Coyote Creek State Park Mora 462 187 7,700 2,300 1969 Boasts the most densely stocked trout stream in New Mexico.[16]
Eagle Nest Lake State Park Colfax 3,488 1,412 8,300 2,500 2004 Provides access to a 2,400-acre (970 ha) reservoir in a scenic mountain valley.[17]
Elephant Butte Lake State Park Sierra 24,500 9,900 4,500 1,400 1964 Surrounds Elephant Butte Reservoir, the state's largest and most popular reservoir.[18]
El Vado Lake State Park Rio Arriba 1,730 700 6,900 2,100 1961 Provides access to a 3,200-acre (1,300 ha) reservoir adjacent to Heron Lake State Park.[19]
Fenton Lake State Park Sandoval 700 280 7,900 2,400 1984 Encompasses a 37-acre (15 ha) reservoir surrounded by ponderosa pine forest.[20]
Heron Lake State Park Rio Arriba 4,100 1,700 7,200 2,200 Provides access to a 5,900-acre (2,400 ha) no-wake reservoir adjacent to El Vado Lake State Park.[21]
Hyde Memorial State Park Santa Fe 350 140 8,500 2,600 1938 Provides outdoor recreation amenities near Santa Fe.[22]
Leasburg Dam State Park Doña Ana 293 119 4,200 1,300 1971 Features a quiet stretch of the Rio Grande below a 1908 diversion dam.[23]
Living Desert Zoo and Gardens State Park Eddy 1,500 610 3,200 980 1967 Comprises a zoo and botanical garden of wildlife native to the Chihuahuan Desert in the city of Carlsbad.[24]
Manzano Mountains State Park Torrance 160 65 7,600 2,300 1973 Protects part of the forested foothills of the Manzano Mountains.[25]
Mesilla Valley Bosque State Park Doña Ana 305 123 3,900 1,200 2003 Interprets a bosque on the Rio Grande and adjacent Chihuahuan Desert.[26]
Morphy Lake State Park Mora 30 12 8,000 2,400 1965 Preserves a small, secluded lake in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains.[27]
Navajo Lake State Park Rio Arriba and San Juan 21,000 8,500 6,100 1,900 1995 Comprises three units on New Mexico's second-largest reservoir.[28]
Oasis State Park Roosevelt 193 78 4,100 1,200 1961 Features a fishing pond and sand dunes amidst the east-central plains.[29]
Oliver Lee Memorial State Park Otero 640 260 4,363 1,330 1980 Showcases a verdant canyon in the Sacramento Mountains and Oliver Lee's restored 1893 ranch house.[30]
Pancho Villa State Park Luna 60 24 4,060 1,240 1961 Interprets the 1916 Battle of Columbus (Pancho Villa's raid onto U.S. soil) and the retaliatory Pancho Villa Expedition.[31]
Percha Dam State Park Sierra 80 32 4,100 1,200 1970 Provides outdoor recreation on an impounded section of the Rio Grande.[32]
Rio Grande Nature Center State Park Bernalillo 38 15 5,000 1,500 1982 Interprets a bosque on the Rio Grande in Albuquerque.[33]
Rockhound State Park Luna 1,100 450 4,500 1,400 1965 Allows mineral collecting for amateur geology in the Florida Mountains.[34]
Santa Rosa Lake State Park Guadalupe 550 220 4,800 1,500 Adjoins a 3,800-acre (1,500 ha) reservoir.[35]
Storrie Lake State Park San Miguel 80 32 6,600 2,000 1960 Adjoins a 1,100-acre (450 ha) reservoir in the Zuni Mountains.[36]
Sugarite Canyon State Park Colfax 3,600 1,500 6,950 2,120 1985 Interprets the ruins of a historic early-20th-century coal-mining camp.[37]
Sumner Lake State Park De Baca 6,700 2,700 4,300 1,300 1966 Adjoins a 4,500-acre (1,800 ha) reservoir on the Pecos River.[38]
Ute Lake State Park Quay 1,500 610 3,900 1,200 1964 Adjoins an 8,200-acre (3,300 ha) reservoir on the Canadian River.[39]
Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park Colfax 8,500 2,600 2005 Honors the veterans of the Vietnam War, the country's oldest such memorial (established 1968) and the only one comprising a whole state park.[40]
Villanueva State Park San Miguel 1,600 650 5,600 1,700 1967 Preserves a red sandstone canyon on the Pecos River.[41]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bottomless Lakes State Park Management and Development Plan" (PDF). Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  2. ^ a b New Mexico State Parks Division. "New Mexico State Parks". Retrieved 2011-02-08. 
  3. ^ New Mexico State Parks Division: Energy, Minerals, and Natural Resources Department (2010). "Cimarron Canyon State Park Management Plan 2010" (PDF). New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-08. 
  4. ^ a b All data come from respective New Mexico State Parks Division webpage unless otherwise noted.
  5. ^ All data come from respective state park management plans unless otherwise noted.
  6. ^ "Bluewater Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  7. ^ New Mexico Bureau of Geology & Mineral Resources. "NMBGMR Geologic Tour: Bottomless Lakes State Park". 
  8. ^ "Brantley Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  9. ^ "Caballo Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  10. ^ "Cerrillos Hills State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  11. ^ "Cimarron Canyon State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  12. ^ "City of Rocks State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  13. ^ "Clayton Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  14. ^ "Conchas Lake State Park Management Plan 2010" (PDF). New Mexico State Parks Division - Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department. 2010. 
  15. ^ "Conchas Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  16. ^ "Coyote Creek State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  17. ^ "Eagle Nest Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  18. ^ "Elephant Butte Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  19. ^ "El Vado Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  20. ^ "Fenton Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  21. ^ "Heron Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  22. ^ "Hyde Memorial State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  23. ^ "Leasburg Dam State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  24. ^ "Living Desert Zoo and Gardens State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  25. ^ "Manzano Mountains State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  26. ^ "Mesilla Valley Bosque State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  27. ^ "Morphy Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  28. ^ "Navajo Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  29. ^ "Oasis State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  30. ^ "Oliver Lee Memorial State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  31. ^ "Pancho Villa State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  32. ^ "Percha Dam State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  33. ^ "Rio Grande Nature Center State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  34. ^ "Rockhound State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  35. ^ "Santa Rosa Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  36. ^ "Storrie Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  37. ^ "Sugarite Canyon State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  38. ^ "Sumner Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  39. ^ "Ute Lake State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  40. ^ "Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  41. ^ "Villanueva State Park". New Mexico State Parks. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 

External links[edit]