Pecan pie

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Pecan Pie
Pecan pie, November 2010.jpg
Type Dessert
Place of origin United States
Main ingredient(s) Pecan and corn syrup
Food energy (per serving) 503 cal kcal

Pecan pie is a pie made primarily with corn syrup and pecan nuts.[1] Variations may include white or brown sugar, sugar syrup, molasses, maple syrup, or honey.[1] It is popularly served at holiday meals and is also considered a specialty of Southern U.S. cuisine. Most pecan pie recipes include salt and vanilla as flavorings. Chocolate and bourbon whiskey are other popular additions to the recipe.[2] Pecan pie is often served with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

Origin[edit]

Claims have been made of the dish existing in the early 1800s in Alabama, but this does not appear to be backed up by recipes or literature.[3] Attempts to trace the dish's origin have not found any recipes dated earlier than 1886,[4] [5] and well-known cookbooks such as Fannie Farmer and The Joy of Cooking did not include this dessert before 1940.[6] The earliest recorded recipes produce a boiled custard with pecans added, which is then baked in a pie crust.[7]

Some have stated that the French invented pecan pie soon after settling in New Orleans, after being introduced to the pecan nut by Native Americans.[citation needed] Pecan pie may be a variant of chess pie, which is made with a similar butter-sugar-egg custard.[8]

The makers of Karo syrup significantly contributed to popularizing the dish[1] and many of the recipes for variants (caramel, cinnamon, Irish creme, peanut butter, etc.) of the classic pie. The company has claimed that the dish was a 1930s "discovery" of a "new use for corn syrup" by a corporate sales executive's wife.[9]

Cultural context[edit]

A slice of pecan pie.

Pecan pie is often mentioned in American literature (and television) as associated with Thanksgiving, Christmas, and other special occasions; for example:

"Dooley handed them a basket stuffed with fruit, nuts, candy, a tinned ham, and a pecan pie. 'Merry Christmas!' he said."
—Jan Karon, 1996[10]
The only kitchen item I usually bring to Italy is plastic wrap... This time, however, I have brought one bag of Georgia pecans and a can of cane syrup, pecan pie being a necessary ingredient of Christmas.
—Frances Mayes, 1997[11]

Pecan pie is a staple of the Southern U.S., and is often used in literary context as a symbol of the South; for example:

"Sweet tea, pecan pie and homemade wine/Where the peaches grow" - Chicken Fried (song, 2003)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Griffith, Linda; Griffith, Fred (2003). Nuts: Recipes from Around the World That Feature Nature's Perfect Ingredient. Macmillan. p. 294. ISBN 0312266243
  2. ^ Cooks.com Bourbon Pecan Pie Recipes
  3. ^ Rick Mcdaniel (photographer); (et al.) (2011). An Irresistible History of Southern Food: Four Centuries of Black-eyed Peas, Collard Greens & Whole Hog Barbecue. The History Press. p. 215. ISBN 1609491939
  4. ^ Food Timeline - Pecan Pie History
  5. ^ Ladies' home journal, Volume 15 By Louisa Knapp, Edward William Bok
  6. ^ Food Timeline - Pecan Pie History
  7. ^ Food Timeline - Pecan Pie History
  8. ^ [Joy of Cooking: All About Pies & Tarts,Irma von Starkloff Rombauer, Marion Rombauer Becker, Ethan Becker; p93]
  9. ^ "History of Karo". Karo. Retrieved May 29, 2013. 
  10. ^ Jan Karon, A Light in the Window (The Mitford Years). 1996; Penguin; ISBN 0-14-025454-4
  11. ^ Frances Mayes, Under the Tuscan Sun. 1997; Broadway; ISBN 0-7679-0038-3

External links[edit]