United States presidential election in Oregon, 2012

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United States presidential election in Oregon, 2012
Oregon
2008 ←
November 6, 2012
→ 2016

  Obama portrait crop.jpg Mitt Romney by Gage Skidmore 6 cropped.jpg
Nominee Barack Obama Mitt Romney
Party Democratic Republican
Home state Illinois Massachusetts
Running mate Joe Biden Paul Ryan
Electoral vote 7 0
Popular vote 970,488 754,175
Percentage 54.24% 42.15%

Oregon presidential election results 2012.svg

County Results
  Obama—70-80%
  Obama—60-70%
  Obama—50-60%
  Romney—<50%
  Romney—50-60%
  Romney—60-70%
  Romney—70-80%

President before election

Barack Obama
Democratic

Elected President

Barack Obama
Democratic

The 2012 United States presidential election in Oregon took place on November 6, 2012, as part of the 2012 General Election in which all 50 states plus The District of Columbia participated. Oregon voters chose seven electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote pitting incumbent Democratic President Barack Obama and his running mate, Vice President Joe Biden, against Republican challenger and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney and his running mate, Congressman Paul Ryan.

On election day, Obama carried Oregon with 54.24% of the vote to Romney's 42.15%, a Democratic victory margin of 12.09%. The Democrats have won the state in every presidential election since 1988.

General election[edit]

United States President: Oregon[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barack Obama 970,488 54.24%
Republican Mitt Romney 754,175 42.15%
Libertarian Gary Johnson 24,089 1.35%
Pacific Green Jill Stein 19,427 1.09%
Constitution (Oregon) Will Christensen 4,432 0.25%
Progressive Rocky Anderson 3,384 0.19%
write-ins 13,275 0.74%
Totals 1,789,270 100%

Democratic primary[edit]

The Democratic primary was held on May 15, 2012. Barack Obama was unopposed for the nomination.

Oregon Democratic Primary, 2012[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barack Obama 309,358 94.79%
Democratic write-ins 16,998 5.21%
Totals 326,358 100%

Republican primary[edit]

Oregon Republican primary, 2012
Oregon
2008 ←
May 15, 2012 (2012-05-15)
→ 2016

  Mitt Romney by Gage Skidmore 6.jpg Ron Paul, official Congressional photo portrait, 2007.jpg
Candidate Mitt Romney Ron Paul
Party Republican Republican
Home state Massachusetts Texas
Delegate count 18 3
Popular vote 204,176 36,810
Percentage 71% 13%

Oregon Republican Presidential Primary Election Results by County, 2012.svg

Results by county. Orange indicates a win by Romney.

The Republican primary occurred on May 15, 2012.[3][4] Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich had withdrawn prior to the election, but their names still appeared on the Oregon ballot.

In order to participate in the primary, voters were required to register to vote by April 24, 2012.[5] A closed primary was used to elect the presidential, legislative, and local partisan offices. A semi-closed primary, which allowed non-affiliated voters to participate, was used to elect the attorney general, secretary of state and treasurer positions.[6]

Oregon Republican Primary, 2012[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mitt Romney 204,176 70.91%
Republican Ron Paul 36,810 12.78%
Republican Rick Santorum (withdrew) 27,042 9.39%
Republican Newt Gingrich (withdrew) 15,451 5.37%
Republican write-ins 4,476 1.55%
Totals 287,955 100%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "November 6, 2012, General Election Abstract of Votes". Oregon Elections Division. Retrieved December 5, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "May 15, 2012, Primary Election Abstracts of Votes: United States President". Oregon Elections Division. Retrieved December 5, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Primary and Caucus Printable Calendar". CNN. Retrieved January 12, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Presidential Primary Dates". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved January 23, 2012. 
  5. ^ Mickler, Lauren (March 6, 2012). "Oregon Primary Two Months Away". Eugene, OR: KEZI 9 News. 
  6. ^ Mapes, Jeff (February 6, 2012). "Oregon Republican Party opens three statewide primaries to non-affiliated voters". The Oregonian. 

External links[edit]