Canon EOS DCS 1

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Canon EOS DCS 1
Overview
Type Single-lens reflex with Digital back
Lens
Lens Interchangeable (EF)
Sensor/Medium
Sensor CCD, 1.3x crop factor (APS-H)
Maximum resolution 3,060 x 2,036 (6.0 megapixels)
ASA/ISO range 80
Storage PCMCIA card slot
Focusing
Focus modes One-shot, AI-Servo, AI-Focus, Manual
Focus areas 5 points
Focus bracketing none
Exposure/Metering
Exposure modes Full auto, programmed, shutter-priority, aperture priority, manual
Exposure metering TTL, full aperture, zones
Metering modes Evaluative, Center Weighted, Average
Flash
Flash Canon hotshoe
Flash bracketing none
Shutter
Shutter electronic focal plane
Shutter speed range 30 to 1/8000 s
Continuous shooting 2 frames in 1.2 seconds, then 1 frame every 8 seconds
Viewfinder
Viewfinder Optical
Image Processing
Custom WB 7 presets, including Auto and custom
WB bracketing none
General
Rear LCD monitor none
Battery Built-in, rechargeable
Optional battery packs none.
Weight 1800 g (body only)

The Canon EOS DCS 1 was Kodak's third Canon-based Digital SLR camera (a rebranded Kodak EOS DCS-1). It was released in December 1995, following the cheaper EOS DCS 3, which had been released earlier that year. Like that camera, it combined an EOS-1N body with a modified Kodak DCS 460 digital back. Despite offering a then-enormous resolution of 6 megapixels, with a relatively large APS-H sensor, a number of technical issues (together with its 3.6 million yen price) meant that it never became a very popular camera other than for a few, very specialized roles.

Although the sensor was much larger than that in the EOS DCS 3, the DCS 1 had a lower fixed sensitivity of ISO 80. The large image size resulted in a burst rate of just over one image per second for two images, followed by an eight-second delay to clear the buffer.[1] A typical contemporary 340MB PCMCIA card or IBM Microdrive could store 53 images.[2] In common with the rest of the Kodak DCS range, the EOS DCS 1 could not produce JPEG files in camera.

The EOS DCS 1 was succeeded in 1998 by the EOS D6000 (a rebranded Kodak DCS 560).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Kodak Professional DCS-1, 3 & 5 Series Digital Still SLR camera". Photography in Malaysia. 
  2. ^ "EOS DCS 1". Canon Camera Museum. Retrieved 2016-10-27. 

External links[edit]