Chatham, Chicago

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Chatham
Community Area 44 - Chatham
West Chatham Bungalow Historic District
West Chatham Bungalow Historic District
Location within the city of Chicago
Location within the city of Chicago
Coordinates: 41°44′24″N 87°36′42″W / 41.74000°N 87.61167°W / 41.74000; -87.61167Coordinates: 41°44′24″N 87°36′42″W / 41.74000°N 87.61167°W / 41.74000; -87.61167
CountryUnited States
StateIllinois
CountyCook
CityChicago
Neighborhoods
Area
 • Total2.92 sq mi (7.56 km2)
Population
 (2015)
 • Total31,392[1]
Demographics 2015[1]
 • White1.24%
 • Black96.61%
 • Hispanic0.91%
 • Asian0.35%
 • Other0.89%
Time zoneUTC-6 (CST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP Codes
60619, parts of 60620
Area code(s)773, 872
Median household income$32,222[1]
Source: U.S. Census, Record Information Services

Chatham is one of the 77 community areas of the city of Chicago, Illinois. It is located on the city's South Side. It includes the neighborhoods of Chatham-Avalon, Chatham Club, Chesterfield, East Chatham, West Chatham and the northern portion of West Chesterfield. Its residents are predominantly African American, and it is home to former Senator Roland Burris. Housing many city employees and other officials, Chatham has been a central area for Chicago's middle-class African Americans since the late 1950s.[2]

Neighborhoods and sub-areas[edit]

Historically, the Chatham community area consisted of three neighborhoods; Avalon Highlands, Chesterfield, and Chatham Fields.[3] The community area also contains two districts listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In addition to two residential historic districts, Chatham is also the location of the Four Nineteen Building, a building which demonstrates the domestic style of gas station architecture, in which stations were designed to resemble small houses.

Garden Homes Historic District[edit]

The Garden Homes Historic District is a residential district bound by South Wabash Avenue to the west, East 87th Street to the north, South Indiana Avenue to the east, and East 89th Street to the south.[4] The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on February 28, 2005.[5]

West Chatham Bungalow Historic District[edit]

The West Chatham Bungalow Historic District is a residential district bound by South Perry Avenue to the east, West 82nd Street to the south, South Stewart Avenue to the west, and West 79th Street to the north. The district includes 283 Chicago bungalows built between 1913 and 1930 along with a smaller number of other residential buildings.[6] The district was added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 19, 2010.[7]

Demographics[edit]

In the 1990 census, Chatham was found to be 1.0% White, 98.7% Black, 0.5% Hispanic, 0.1% Asian and 0.3% other.[8]

In the 2000 census, Chatham was found to be 0.32% White, 98.0% Black, 0.59% Hispanic, 0.06% Asian and 1.00% other. The median income was $37,809.[9]

Transportation[edit]

Chatham has stops at 79th Street (Chatham), 83rd Street (Avalon Park), and 87th Street (Woodruff) on Metra's Metra Electric commuter rail line, which provides daily service between downtown Chicago at Millennium Station and the southern destinations of University Park and Blue Island, as well as many Chicago Transit Authority bus and train stops.[10] The CTA Red Line stations at 79th and 87th also serve Chatham.

Politics[edit]

The Chatham community area has supported the Democratic Party in the past two presidential elections. In the 2016 presidential election, the Chatham cast 14,075 votes for Hillary Clinton and cast 230 votes for Donald Trump (96.91% to 1.58%).[11] In the 2012 presidential election, Chatham cast 16,696 votes for Barack Obama and cast 93 votes for Mitt Romney (99.27% to 0.55%).[12]

Notable people[edit]

Education[edit]

Lenart Regional Gifted Center. School Entrance

Chicago Public Schools operates public schools serving Chatham. The following schools serve students from the Chatham neighborhood.[19]

Secondary Schools

Primary Schools

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Community Data Snapshot - Chatham" (PDF). cmap.illinois.gov. MetroPulse. Retrieved November 28, 2017.
  2. ^ "Chatham". www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  3. ^ Goeken, Brian, ed. (November 1, 2007). "Landmark Designation Report: Chatham-Greater Grand Crossing Commercial District" (PDF). Commission on Chicago Landmark. City of Chicago Department of Planning and Development. Retrieved December 6, 2019.
  4. ^ Guarino, Jean (July 1, 2004). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Garden Homes Historic District" (PDF). Illinois Historic Preservation Agency. Retrieved April 10, 2016.
  5. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. March 13, 2009.
  6. ^ Bruni, Carla (August 19, 2009). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: West Chatham Bungalow Historic District" (PDF). Illinois Historic Preservation Division. Retrieved October 21, 2019.
  7. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. November 2, 2013.
  8. ^ Encyclopedia of Chicago, "Chatham", Available online at http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/232.html, Cited September 29, 2009
  9. ^ U.S. Census, Record Information Services.
  10. ^ Lane, Laura (January 19, 2014). "Map: South Shore Line, Metra Electric Line". The Times of Northwest Indiana. Retrieved June 11, 2020.
  11. ^ Ali, Tanveer (November 9, 2016). "How Every Chicago Neighborhood Voted In The 2016 Presidential Election". DNAInfo. Archived from the original on September 24, 2019. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  12. ^ Ali, Tanveer (November 9, 2012). "How Every Chicago Neighborhood Voted In The 2012 Presidential Election". DNAInfo. Archived from the original on February 3, 2019. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  13. ^ Burris, Roland (April 18, 2011). "Roland Burris: No Regrets on Accepting Senate Seat from Blagojevich" (Interview). Interviewed by Carol Felsenthal. Chicago: Chicago. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  14. ^ "Corporal John Peter Fardy, USMC". Who's Who in Marine Corps History. History Division, United States Marine Corps. Archived from the original on September 26, 2005. Retrieved April 6, 2006.
  15. ^ Staff Report (August 8, 1948). "20 Streets in New City To Be Named for Men in War II". Chicago Tribune – via ProQuest.
  16. ^ "List of Chicago Tribute Markers 1997–2002". City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  17. ^ Jensen, Trevor; Mills, Steven (April 4, 2008). "R. Eugene Pincham: 1925 - 2008". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved March 10, 2020.
  18. ^ James Janega (April 13, 2008). "R. Eugene Pincham remembered for contributions to law, community". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved June 23, 2017.
  19. ^ http://www.cps.edu/Schools/Find_a_school/Pages/Findaschool.aspx | Chicago Public Schools' Search

External links[edit]