Flying Dutchman (dinghy)

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Flying Dutchman
Flying Dutchman insigna.png
FDusa1488 Photo Wally Eaton.jpg
Development
DesignerUus Van Essen and Conrad Gülcher
LocationNetherlands
Year1951
No. builtmore than 10,000
Builder(s)Sunbeam Yachts
Alpa Yachts
Mader Bootswerft
MacKay Boats
Plastrend / Composite Technologies
Lanaverre
Lockley Newport Boats
Advance Sailboat Corp.
Binks Yacht Contructions
Chantier Naval Costantini
Mobjack Manufacturing
RoleRacing sailing dinghy
NameFlying Dutchman
Crewtwo
Boat
Crewtwo
Boat weight287 lb (130 kg)
Hull
Typemonohull
Constructionfiberglass or wood
LOA20.00 ft (6.10 m)
Beam5.90 ft (1.80 m)
Hull appendages
Keel/board typecenterboard
Rudder(s)transom-mounted rudder
Rig
Rig typeBermuda rig
Sails
Sailplanfractional rigged sloop
Mainsail area118.4 sq ft (11.00 m2)
Jib/genoa area64.5 sq ft (5.99 m2)
Spinnaker area226.0 sq ft (21.00 m2)
Upwind sail area182.9 sq ft (16.99 m2)
Racing
D-PN82.6
RYA PN289

The Flying Dutchman is a Dutch planing sailing dinghy that was designed by Uus Van Essen and Conrad Gülcher as a high performance, one design racer and first built in 1951.[1][2][3][4][5][6]

The boat was an Olympic sailing class from 1960 until 1992.[1][2]

Production[edit]

The boat was built in the past by Sunbeam Yachts, Alpa Yachts, Mader Bootswerft, MacKay Boats, Plastrend / Composite Technologies, Lanaverre, Lockley Newport Boats, Advance Sailboat Corp., Binks Yacht Contructions, Chantier Naval Costantini and Mobjack Manufacturing, starting in 1951. More than 10,000 have been built. In 2022 Mader Bootswerft were still producing the design.[1][2][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28]

Design[edit]

Crew trapezing on a Flying Dutchman

The Flying Dutchman is a racing sailboat, initially built of wood, with many modern boats made from fiberglass sandwich construction with a plastic deck. Cold-molded plywood is still used and some sailers prefer that material.[1][2][5][6]

The boat has a fractional sloop rig, a spooned raked stem, a plumb transom, a transom-hung rudder controlled by a tiller and a retractible centerboard. Modern boats may have plastic rudders and centerboards. It displaces 287 lb (130 kg).[1][2][5][6]

The boat has many adjustable settings available while sailing, including the genoa halyard, shroud tension and the mast rake. The crew can use a trapeze to balance the boat.[1][2][6]

For sailing downwind the design may be equipped with a symmetrical spinnaker of 226.0 sq ft (21.00 m2) and in fact was the first design equipped with a spinnaker bow chute.[1][2][6]

The design has a Portsmouth Yardstick D-PN of 82.6 and a RYA PN of 879.[29][30]

Operational history[edit]

The boat is supported by an active class club that organizes racing events, the International Flying Dutchman Class Organization.[31][32]

The Flying Dutchman was an Olympic sailing class in double-handed dinghies from 1960 until 1992.[1][2]

Due to its complexity, the design's cost has been a barrier to its wider acceptance.[6]

A Classic Sailboats review noted that "the 'fastest double-handed dinghy in the world' made its Olympic debut in Naples in 1960. It was based on the new go-fast concept of a trapezing crew and a large spinnaker. The ideal crewman should be tall, heavy, nimble and smart – not a simple recipe to follow. The FD has a long waterline and normally planes on the beat. But the large genoa jib makes tacking slow. Pure boatspeed is thus the key ingredient for success."[6]

The United States Sailing Association describes the boat as "one of the most exhilarating dinghies you will ever be in."[33]

Racing[edit]

Boats on display[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Flying Dutchman sailboat". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Flying Dutchman". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  3. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Uus van Essen". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  4. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Uus van Essen". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  5. ^ a b c Mader Bootswerft. "Flying Dutchman". mader-boote.de. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Classic Sailboats. "Flying Dutchman". classicsailboats.info. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  7. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Sunbeam Yachts - Schöchl Yachtbau". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  8. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Sunbeam Yachts - Schöchl Yachtbau". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  9. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Alpa Yachts (ITA)". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  10. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Alpa Yachts". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  11. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Mader Bootswerft". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  12. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Mader Bootswerft". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  13. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "MacKay Boats Ltd". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  14. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "MacKay Boats Ltd". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  15. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Plastrend / Composite Technologies". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 31 October 2021. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  16. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Plastrend / Composite Technologies". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  17. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Lanaverre (FRA)". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  18. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Lanaverre". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  19. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Lockley Newport Boats (USA)". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 6 August 2020. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  20. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Lockley Newport Boats". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  21. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Advance Sailboat Corp. (USA)". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 20 August 2020. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  22. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Advance Sailboat Corp". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  23. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Binks Yacht Contructions". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  24. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Binks Yacht Contructions". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  25. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Costantini (Chantier Naval Costantini)". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  26. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Costantini (Chantier Naval Costantini)". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  27. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Mobjack Manufacturing Corp". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 18 April 2021. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  28. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Mobjack Manufacturing Corp". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  29. ^ US Sailing. "Centerboard Classes". ussailing.org. Archived from the original on 16 August 2012. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  30. ^ Royal Yachting Association (2007). "RYA Portsmouth Yardstick Scheme 2007" (PDF). benfleetyachtclub.org. Archived from the original (PDF) on 18 May 2015. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  31. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Flying Dutchman Class - International". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  32. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Flying Dutchman Class - International". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  33. ^ United States Sailing Association (2022). "About Flying Dutchman USA". ussailing.org. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.

External links[edit]