International FJ

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International FJ
International FJ start at the 2007 World Championships in San Francisco Bay
Development
DesignerUus Van Essen and Conrad Gülcher
LocationNetherlands
Year1956
No. built4600
Builder(s)Pim van der Brink
Van Doesburg
Dusseldorp
Van Wettum
Perry Lengton
Galetti
Radenksy
Vanguard
Grampian Marine
Paceship Yachts
Chantier Naval Costantini
Alpa Yachts
Centro Nautico Adriatico
Comar Yachts
Nautivela
Advance Sailboat Corp
W. D. Schock Corp
Whitecap Composites
Zim Sailing
RoleTrainer and racer
NameInternational FJ
Boat
Crewtwo
Displacement165 lb (75 kg)
Draft2.50 ft (0.76 m) with centerboard down
TrapezeTrapeze for the FJ was introduced around 1982.
Hull
Typemonohull
Constructionplywoodfiberglasscarbon fiber
LOA13.22 ft (4.03 m)
LWL12.25 ft (3.73 m)
Beam5.25 ft (1.60 m)
Hull appendages
Keel/board typeCenterboard
Rudder(s)transom-mounted rudder
Rig
Rig typeBermuda rig
Sails
Sailplanfractional rigged sloop
Total sail area104.00 sq ft (9.662 m2)

The International FJ is a Dutch sailboat that was designed by Uus Van Essen and Conrad Gülcher as a trainer and one design racer, first built in 1956.[1][2][3][4]

The boat was initially called the Flying Dutchman Junior (after the Flying Dutchman one design racer), as it was designed as a trainer for that Olympic sailing class boat. It was later called the Flying Junior. In 1980 the name was again officially changed to the International FJ.[1][2][5]

The design became a World Sailing accepted International class in 1972-73.[6]

Production[edit]

The design has been built by a large number of companies including Grampian Marine and Paceship Yachts in Canada, Chantier Naval Costantini in France, Alpa Yachts, Centro Nautico Adriatico, Comar Yachts, Galetti and Nautivela in Italy, Van Doesburg, Dusseldorp, Van Wettum and Perry Lengton in The Nederlands, Advance Sailboat Corp, W. D. Schock Corp, Whitecap Composites and Zim Sailing in the United States.

The first Flying Junior was build by Pim van den Brink (Kolibri) in the Dutch village Stompwijk. [1][2][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28]

4,600 + boats have been built.[1][2]

W. D. Schock Corp records indicate that they built 70 boats between 1968 and 1972.[29]

It remains in production by Centro Nautico Adriatico, Zim Sailing and Whitecap Composites.[5][30][31]

Design[edit]

International FJs at the 2007 World Championships in San Francisco Bay

The International FJ is a racing sailing dinghy, with early versions built from wood. Fiberglass was class-authorized in 1960.[1][2]

The boat has a fractional sloop rig, a raked stem, a plumb transom, a transom-hung rudder controlled by a tiller and retractable centerboard. It displaces 165 lb (75 kg).[1][2]

The boat has a draft of 2.50 ft (0.76 m) with the centerboard extended and 7 in (18 cm) with it retracted, allowing operation in shallow water, beaching, ground transportation on a trailer or car roof.[1][2]

For sailing downwind the design may be equipped with a symmetrical spinnaker of 86 sq ft (8.0 m2). The boat is sailed with a crew of two sailors. A single trapeze is available for use by the crew.[1][2][6]

The Club FJ is a version with heavier construction but similar dimensions produced by Zim Sailing. It displaces 220 lb (100 kg) and has a spinnaker of 80 sq ft (7.4 m2).[1][2][31]

Whitecap Composites produces a lightened version of the design with improved ergonomics, marketed as the "Turbo FJ".[5]

Operational history[edit]

The boat is supported by an active class club that organizes racing events, the International FJ Class.[32][33]

See also[edit]

Related development

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i McArthur, Bruce (2022). "International FJ sailboat". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "International FJ". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  3. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Uus van Essen". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  4. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Uus van Essen". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  5. ^ a b c Whitecap Composites. "Turbo FJ". whitecapcomposites.com. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  6. ^ a b World Sailing (2022). "Boat Class Flying Junior". sailing.org. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  7. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Grampian Marine". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 3 March 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  8. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Grampian Marine". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  9. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Paceship Yachts Ltd". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 11 February 2021. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  10. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Paceship Yachts Ltd". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 12 February 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  11. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Schock W.D." sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 18 July 2020. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  12. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Schock W.D." sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 23 December 2021. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  13. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Comar Yachts". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  14. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Comar Yachts". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  15. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Alpa Yachts". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  16. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Alpa Yachts". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  17. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Advance Sailboat Corp". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 20 August 2020. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  18. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Advance Sailboat Corp". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  19. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Nautivela". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 10 September 2020. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  20. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Nautivela". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  21. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Costantini (Chantier Naval Costantini)". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  22. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Costantini (Chantier Naval Costantini)". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  23. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Centro Nautico Adriatico". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 25 July 2020. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  24. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Centro Nautico Adriatico". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  25. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Zim Sailing". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  26. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Zim Sailing". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  27. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Whitecap Composites". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 7 July 2020. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  28. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Whitecap Composites". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 5 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  29. ^ W. D. Schock Corp. "Boats built by W.D. Schock". wdschock.com. Archived from the original on 21 February 2010. Retrieved 9 August 2022.
  30. ^ Centro Nautico Adriatico (2022). "FJ". centronauticoadriatico.com. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  31. ^ a b Zim Sailing (23 July 2022). "Club FJ". zimsailing.com. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  32. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2022). "Flying Junior Class International Association". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.
  33. ^ Sea Time Tech, LLC (2022). "Flying Junior Class International Association". sailboat.guide. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022.

External links[edit]