Jean-Yves Duclos

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Jean-Yves Duclos
Duclos in 2015
Minister of Public Services and Procurement
Receiver General for Canada
Assumed office
July 26, 2023
Prime MinisterJustin Trudeau
Preceded byHelena Jaczek
Minister of Health
In office
October 26, 2021 – July 26, 2023
Prime MinisterJustin Trudeau
Preceded byPatty Hajdu
Succeeded byMark Holland
President of the Treasury Board
In office
November 20, 2019 – October 26, 2021
Prime MinisterJustin Trudeau
Preceded byJoyce Murray
Succeeded byMona Fortier
Minister of Families, Children and Social Development
In office
November 4, 2015 – November 20, 2019
Prime MinisterJustin Trudeau
Preceded byPierre Poilievre
Succeeded byAhmed Hussen
Member of Parliament
for Québec
Assumed office
October 19, 2015
Preceded byAnnick Papillon
Personal details
Born (1965-01-01) 1 January 1965 (age 59)
Quebec City, Quebec, Canada
Political partyLiberal
ResidenceQuebec City
Alma materUniversity of Alberta (BA)
London School of Economics (MA, PhD)
ProfessionEconomist, professor

Jean-Yves Duclos PC MP FRSC (French pronunciation: [ʒɑ̃ iv dyklo]; born 1965) is a Canadian economist and politician who has served as Minister of Public Services and Procurement since July 26, 2023. He previously served as minister of Health from 2021 to 2023. A member of the Liberal Party, he has been the Member of Parliament (MP) for Québec since 2015.

Early career and education[edit]

Duclos attended the University of Alberta, where he earned an undergraduate degree in economics, followed by graduate and doctoral studies in economics at the London School of Economics. His doctoral thesis in 1992 was titled "Progressivity, equity and the take-up of state benefits, with application to the 1985 British tax and benefit system".[1] Prior to his election to the House of Commons, he headed the economics department at Université Laval and was the president-elect of the Canadian Economics Association. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2014.[2]

Tenure in Parliament[edit]

He was elected to represent the riding of Québec in the House of Commons in the 2015 general election as a member of the Liberal Party of Canada.[3] He was the first Liberal elected to represent this riding since Gilles Lamontagne, who left office in 1984.[4] He was appointed to the federal Cabinet, headed by Justin Trudeau, as Minister of Families, Children and Social Development.[5] He was re-elected in the 2019 general election and sworn in as President of the Treasury Board.

On October 26, 2021, Duclos succeeded Patty Hajdu due to appointed as Minister of Indigenous Services, and he was appointed Minister of Health. This made him a prominent figure in Canadian government response to COVID-19 pandemic, which he supported an end to most generalized public health restrictions, such as face mask mandates until the emergence of fourth COVID-19 wave due to the highly transmissible Deltacron hybrid variant, a pre-dominant strain in the country that is combined of Delta and Omicron variants, started from July 2021 to the end of April 2022. He also expanded the COVID-19 vaccination program in Canada.[citation needed]

On July 26, 2023, Duclos resigned as a Health Minister due to his appointed Minister of Public Services and Procurement in Trudeau's cabinet reshuffle. He was succeeded by Mark Holland.[citation needed]

Electoral record[edit]

2021 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Jean-Yves Duclos 18,132 35.4 +2.1
Bloc Québécois Louis Sansfaçon 14,824 29.0 -3.7
Conservative Bianca Boutin 9,239 18.0 +3.0
New Democratic Tommy Bureau 6,652 13.0 +1.5
Green Patrick Kerr 1,182 2.3 -3.1
People's Daniel Brisson 855 1.7 +0.5
Free Karine Simard 307 0.6 N/A
Total valid votes 51,191 98.0
Total rejected ballots 1,026 2.0
Turnout 52,217 67.6
Eligible voters 77,298
Liberal hold Swing +2.9
Source: Elections Canada[6]


2019 Canadian federal election: Québec
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Jean-Yves Duclos 18,047 33.3 +4.4 $80,667.63
Bloc Québécois Christiane Gagnon 17,722 32.7 +13.85 none listed
Conservative Bianca Boutin 8,118 15.0 -6.79 $38,447.35
New Democratic Tommy Bureau 6,220 11.5 -15.54 $6,381.41
Green Luc Joli-Coeur 2,949 5.4 +2.49 $9,773.82
People's Bruno Dabiré 674 1.2 none listed
Rhinoceros Sébastien CoRhino 347 0.6 none listed
Pour l'Indépendance du Québec Luc Paquin 119 0.2 none listed
Total valid votes/expense limit 54,198 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 1,051
Turnout 55,249 70.0
Eligible voters 78,950
Liberal hold Swing -1.3
Source: Elections Canada[7][8]
2015 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Jean-Yves Duclos 15,566 28.90 +19.88 $45,987.20
New Democratic Annick Papillon 14,566 27.04 -15.60 $33,392.85
Conservative Pierre-Thomas Asselin 11,737 21.79 +4.02 $17,402.72
Bloc Québécois Charles Mordret 10,153 18.85 -9.11 $41,425.08
Green Philippe Riboty 1,570 2.91 +0.74 $1,006.90
Marxist–Leninist Normand Fournier 153 0.28
Strength in Democracy Danielle Provost 122 0.23
Total valid votes/Expense limit 53,867 100.00   $214,308.69
Total rejected ballots 820 1.50
Turnout 54,687 69.09
Eligible voters 79,157
Liberal gain from New Democratic Swing +17.74
Source: Elections Canada[9][10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Duclos, Jean-Yves (1992). Progressivity, equity and the take-up of state benefits, with application to the 1985 British tax and benefit system (PhD). London School of Economics and Political Science. Retrieved 5 May 2021.
  2. ^ Jean-Yves Duclos Biography, Liberal.ca.
  3. ^ Deux libéraux élus à Québec, Radio Canada, October 20, 2015.
  4. ^ Stephen Gordon, Jean-Yves Duclos: An economist goes to Parliament, Maclean's, October 24, 2015.
  5. ^ Quebec MPs given prominent posts in new Liberal cabinet, CBC News, November 4, 2015.
  6. ^ "List of confirmed candidates – September 20, 2021 Federal Election". Elections Canada. Retrieved 2 September 2021.
  7. ^ "List of confirmed candidates". Elections Canada. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  8. ^ "Election Night Results". Elections Canada. Retrieved November 11, 2019.
  9. ^ Canada, Elections. "Voter Information Service – Find your electoral district". elections.ca.
  10. ^ Canada, Elections. "Error page". elections.ca.
29th Ministry – Cabinet of Justin Trudeau
Cabinet posts (4)
Predecessor Office Successor
Helena Jaczek Minister of Public Services and Procurement
July 26, 2023 – present
Incumbent
Patty Hajdu Minister of Health
October 26, 2021 – July 26, 2023
Mark Holland
Joyce Murray President of the Treasury Board
November 20, 2019 – October 26, 2021
Mona Fortier
Pierre Poilievre Minister of Families, Children and Social Development
November 4, 2015 – November 20, 2019
Ahmed Hussen

External links[edit]