Kyrgyzstan national football team

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Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan nation football logo, March 2016.jpg
Nickname(s) Ак шумкарлар, Ak şumkarlar
(The White Falcons)
Association Football Federation of the Kyrgyz Republic
Confederation AFC (Asia)
Sub-confederation CAFA (Central Asia)
Head coach Aleksandr Krestinin
Captain Azamat Baymatov
Most caps Vadim Kharchenko (54)
Top scorer Anton Zemlianukhin (7)
Home stadium Spartak Stadium
FIFA code KGZ
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 104 Increase 7 (14 July 2016)
Highest 100 (April–May 2016)
Lowest 201 (March 2013)
Elo ranking
Current 174
Highest 149 (9 April 2006)
Lowest 175 (February 2013)
First international
 Uzbekistan 3–0 Kyrgyzstan Kyrgyzstan
(Tashkent, Uzbekistan; August 23, 1992)[1]
Biggest win
 Kyrgyzstan 6–0 Maldives 
(Tehran, Iran; June 13, 1997)
Biggest defeat
 Iran 7–0 Kyrgyzstan Kyrgyzstan
(Damascus, Syria; June 4, 1997)
AFC Challenge Cup
Appearances 3 (First in 2006)
Best result 3rd 2006

The Kyrgyzstan national football team (Kyrgyz: Кыргыз Республикасынын улуттук курама командасы, Kırgız Respublikasının uluttuk kurama komandası) is the national team of Kyrgyzstan and is controlled by the Football Federation of the Kyrgyz Republic. It is a member of the Central Asian Football Association, which is a member of the Asian Football Confederation.

History[edit]

After the breakup of the Soviet Union and declaration of its independence, Kyrgyzstan became a fully recognized FIFA and AFC member. They played their first match away in Tashkent, against Uzbekistan on 23 August 1992 in the Central Asia Tournament, losing 3–0.

In June 1993, Kyrgyzstan travelled to Tehran, Iran for the 1993 ECO Cup. They lost 3–2 on 6 June to Azerbaijan and then drew 1–1 two days later against Tajikistan.

In April 1994, Kyrgyzstan played other Central Asian teams in a tournament in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. On 13 April they lost 5–1 to Turkmenistan, then on 15 April 1–0 to Tajikistan. On 17 April they drew 0–0 against Kazakhstan before losing 3–0 to the hosts two days later.[1]

World Cup record[edit]

World Cup Finals World Cup Qualifications
Year Result Position GP W D* L GS GA GP W D* L GS GA
1930 to 1990 Was part of USSR - - - - - - -
United States 1994 Did not enter - - - - - - -
France 1998 Did not qualify - - - - - - - 5 3 0 2 12 11
South KoreaJapan 2002 Did not qualify - - - - - - - 6 1 1 4 3 9
Germany 2006 Did not qualify - - - - - - - 8 3 1 4 11 12
South Africa 2010 Did not qualify - - - - - - - 2 1 0 1 2 2
Brazil 2014 Did not qualify - - - - - - - 2 0 0 2 0 7
Russia 2018 Did not qualify - - - - - - - 8 4 2 2 10 8
Total - 0/21 - - - - - - 31 12 5 15 38 49

Asian Cup record[edit]

  • 1956 to 1992 – Did not enter, was part of USSR
Asian Cup Finals Asian Cup Qualifications
Year Result Position GP W D* L GS GA GP W D* L GS GA
1956 to 1992 Was part of USSR - - - - - - -
United Arab Emirates 1996 Did not qualify - - - - - - 4 1 0 3 3 7
Lebanon 2000 Did not qualify - - - - - - 3 0 0 3 3 11
China 2004 Did not qualify - - - - - - 2 1 0 1 3 2
IndonesiaMalaysiaThailandVietnam 2007 Did not enter - - - - - -
Qatar 2011 Did not qualify - - - - - - 2010 AFC Challenge Cup was used to determine qualification for the 2011 AFC Asian Cup qualification
Australia 2015 Did not qualify - - - - - - 2012 & 2014 AFC Challenge Cup are used to determine qualification for the 2015 AFC Asian Cup qualification
Total Best: - - - - - - 9 2 0 7 9 20

AFC Challenge Cup record[edit]