List of World Heritage Sites in South Korea

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Location of World Heritage Sites in South Korea.[1]
Note: Seoul is home to three separate properties; Royal Tombs of the Joseon Dynasty as well as Sansa locate throughout the country, only one site is shown on map respectively.

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Sites are places of importance to cultural or natural heritage as described in the UNESCO World Heritage Convention, established in 1972.[2] The Republic of Korea accepted the convention on 14 September 1988, making its historical sites eligible for inclusion on the list. As of 2019, there are fourteen World Heritage Sites in South Korea, including thirteen cultural sites and one natural site.[1]

The first three sites of South Korea, Haeinsa Temple Janggyeong Panjeon, the Depositories for the Tripitaka Koreana Woodblocks, Jongmyo Shrine and Seokguram Grotto and Bulguksa Temple, were inscribed on the list at the 19th Session of the World Heritage Committee, held in Berlin, Germany in 1995.[3] In 2007, Jeju Volcanic Island and Lava Tubes became the first site selected for its natural significance.[4] South Korea's latest inscription, Seowon, Korean Neo-Confucian Academies, was added to the list in 2019.[5]

In addition to its inscribed sites, South Korea also maintains fourteen properties on its tentative list.[6]

World Heritage Sites[edit]

UNESCO lists sites under ten criteria; each entry must meet at least one of the criteria. Criteria i through vi are cultural, whereas vii through x are natural.[7]

Site Image Location Year listed UNESCO data Description
Seokguram Grotto and Bulguksa Temple Bulguk Tempel.jpg KorNorth Gyeongsang 1995 Cultural:KorSeo
(i)(iv)
[8]
Haeinsa Temple Janggyeong Panjeon, the Depositories for the Tripitaka Koreana Woodblocks Haeinsa Temple (6222053899).jpg KorSouth Gyeongsang 1995 Cultural:KorHae
(iv)(vi)
[9]
Jongmyo Shrine Chongmyo repository (1509268349).jpg KorSeoul 1995 Cultural:KorJon
(iv)
[10]
Changdeokgung Palace Complex Juhamnu, Changdeokgung - Seoul, Korea.JPG KorSeoul 1997 Cultural:KorCha
(ii)(iii)(iv)
[11]
Hwaseong Fortress Hwaseong2.jpg KorGyeonggi 1997 Cultural:KorHwa
(ii)(iii)
[12]
Gochang, Hwasun and Ganghwa Dolmen Sites Korea-Gwangju-Gochang Dolmens 5350-06.JPG KorIncheon, North Jeolla and South Jeolla 2000 Cultural:KorCha
(iii)
[13]
Gyeongju Historic Areas Korea-Gyeongju-Bunhwangsa-Lanterns-03.jpg KorNorth Gyeongsang 2000 Cultural:KorGye
(ii)(iii)
[14]
Jeju Volcanic Island and Lava Tubes KOCIS Halla Mountain in Jeju-do (6387785543).jpg KorJeju 2007 Natural:KorJej
(vii)(viii)
[15]
Royal Tombs of the Joseon Dynasty Sejong tomb 1.jpg KorGyeonggi, Seoul and Gangwon 2009 Cultural:KorRoy
(iii)(iv)(vi)
[16]
Historic Villages of Korea: Hahoe and Yangdong Hahoe 8784.jpg KorNorth Gyeongsang 2010 Cultural:KorHis
(iii)(iv)
[17]
Namhansanseong Khitai5.jpg KorGyeonggi 2014 Cultural:KorNam
(ii)(iv)
[18]
Baekje Historic Areas MuryeongsTomb.jpg KorSouth Chungcheong and North Jeolla 2015 Cultural:KorBae
(ii)(iii)
[19]
Sansa, Buddhist Mountain Monasteries in Korea Beopjusa Temple Stay South Korea.jpg KorNorth Chungcheong, North Gyeongsang, South Chungcheong, South Gyeongsang and South Jeolla 2018 Cultural:KorSan
(iii)
[20]
Seowon, Korean Neo-Confucian Academies Dosan Seowon in Andong KorDaegu, North Gyeongsang, North Jeolla, South Chungcheong and South Gyeongsang 2019 Cultural:KorSwo
(iii)
[21]

Tentative list[edit]

In addition to sites inscribed on the World Heritage List, member states can maintain a list of tentative sites that they may consider for nomination. Nominations for the World Heritage List are only accepted if the site was previously listed on the tentative list.[22] As of 2020, South Korea maintains thirteen properties on its tentative list:[6]

  1. Ancient Mountain Fortresses in Central Korea
  2. Daegokcheon Stream Petroglyphs
  3. Gaya Tumuli of GimhaeHaman
  4. Kangjingun Kiln Sites
  5. Mt. Soraksan Nature Reserve
  6. Naganeupseong, Town Fortress and Village
  7. Oeam Folk Village
  8. Salterns in South Jeolla Province - Sinan and Yeonggwang
  9. Seoul City Wall
  10. Sites of fossilized dinosaurs across the southern South Korean coast
  11. Southwestern Coast Tidal Flats
  12. Stone Buddhas and Pagodas at Hwasun Unjusa Temple
  13. Upo Wetland

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Republic of Korea". UNESCO. Retrieved 30 June 2018.
  2. ^ "The World Heritage Convention". UNESCO. Retrieved 21 September 2010.
  3. ^ "Report of the 19th Session of the Committee". UNESCO. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  4. ^ "Decision: 31 COM 8B.12". UNESCO. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  5. ^ "Seowon, Korean Neo-Confucian Academies". UNESCO. Retrieved 11 July 2019.
  6. ^ a b "Tentative List – Republic of Korea". UNESCO. Retrieved 4 January 2020.
  7. ^ "UNESCO World Heritage Centre The Criteria for Selection". UNESCO World Heritage Centre. Retrieved 17 August 2018.
  8. ^ "Seokguram Grotto and Bulguksa Temple". UNESCO. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  9. ^ "Haeinsa Temple Janggyeong Panjeon, the Depositories for the Tripitaka Koreana Woodblocks". UNESCO. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  10. ^ "Jongmyo Shrine". UNESCO. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  11. ^ "Changdeokgung Palace Complex". UNESCO. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  12. ^ "Hwaseong Fortress". UNESCO. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  13. ^ "Gochang, Hwasun and Ganghwa Dolmen Sites". UNESCO. Retrieved 19 February 2017.
  14. ^ "Gyeongju Historic Areas". UNESCO. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  15. ^ "Jeju Volcanic Island and Lava Tubes". UNESCO. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  16. ^ "Royal Tombs of the Joseon Dynasty". UNESCO. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  17. ^ "Historic Villages of Korea: Hahoe and Yangdong". UNESCO. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  18. ^ "Namhansanseong". UNESCO. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  19. ^ "Baekje Historic Areas". UNESCO. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  20. ^ "Sansa, Buddhist Mountain Monasteries in Korea". UNESCO. Retrieved 30 June 2018.
  21. ^ "Seowon, Korean Neo-Confucian Academies". UNESCO. Retrieved 11 Jul 2019.
  22. ^ "Tentative Lists". UNESCO. Retrieved 7 October 2010.