List of equipment of the Australian Army

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This is a list of the equipment currently used by the Australian Army.

Armoured Vehicles[edit]

Model Image Origin Type Number Notes
Armoured Combat Vehicles
M1 Abrams Exercise Gold Eagle smooth ride for Aussie, Marine tanks 130914-M-AL626-0138.jpg  United States Main battle tank 59 59 M1A1 AIM SA Abrams were purchased to replace the Leopard AS1 in service with the 1st Armoured Regiment. The first M1 equipped sub-units of the regiment became operational in mid-2007.[1] The Army is slated to upgrade its M1A1 fleet under LAND 907 Phase 2 through replacement with the M1A2 in 2025.[2] The US has approved a Foreign Military Sale (FMS) to Australia.[3]
ASLAV ASLAV in Afghanistan 2011.jpg  Canada
 Australia
Combat reconnaissance vehicle 257 Under LAND 400 Phase 2 the ASLAV is slated to be replaced by a new Armoured Reconnaissance Vehicle (ARV), the Boxer (armoured fighting vehicle).[4][5][6]
Boxer CRV Boxer Land 400.jpg  Germany
 Netherlands
Combat reconnaissance vehicle 25 (211)[7] At least 211 vehicles on order with deliveries expected to begin in 2019.[8] Part of the LAND 400 Phase 2 program.[9][10] The project includes the option for 11 additional ambulance variants.[11][12]
M113 M113AS4 during Predator's Strike 2011.jpg  United States Armoured personnel carrier 431 The Army now has 340 M113AS4 and 91 M113AS3 in service in seven variants.[13][14] The vehicles are used in the armoured reconnaissance and armoured personnel carrier roles. The Army had operated 840 M113A1 vehicles in nine variants.[13]
The M113 family of vehicles is scheduled to be replaced under LAND 400 Phase 3, the Request for Tender (RfT) for which was released on 24 August 2018. LAND 400 Phase 3 will replace the M113AS4s with up to 450 infantry fighting vehicles (IFVs) and 17 manoeuvre support vehicles.[15]
Armoured Engineering
M88A2 Hercules Australian M88 Hercules during Talisman Sabre 2011.jpg  United States Armoured recovery vehicle 13 Seven M88A2 Recovery Vehicles were purchased in 2007 to support the M1 Abrams tanks.[1] Another six were purchased and entered service in 2017.[16] The US has approved a Foreign Military Sale (FMS) of new M88A2s to Australia.[3]

Utility, reconnaissance and support vehicles[edit]

Model Image Origin Type Number Notes
Bushmaster PMV Bushmaster at the 2016 ADFA Open Day.jpg  Australia Infantry mobility vehicle 1,052 The Army has ordered a total of 1,052 Bushmaster Protected Mobility Vehicles to date, with deliveries commencing in mid-2005.[17]
Hawkei PMV Hawkei DSC02320.JPG  Australia Armoured car 1,100 on order The Army has ordered 1,100 Hawkei Protected Mobility Vehicles – Light (PMV-L) to partially replace the Land Rover Perentie. It is smaller and around half the weight of the Bushmaster. It is able to be carried underslung by the CH-47F Chinook helicopter.[18]
Land Rover Perentie Australian SOTG patrol Oct 2009.jpg  United Kingdom
 Australia
Utility vehicle (various roles) <1,500 5,000+ Land Rovers were originally acquired as a fleet of light duty vehicles for transporting stores, equipment and personnel. As of 2017 fewer than 1,500 remain in service.
G-Wagon Australian Soldiers with 2nd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment dismark from HMAS Canberra and come ashore at Kawaihae Pier, Hawaii during RIMPAC 2016 (Cropped).jpg  Germany Multi-purpose/light assault vehicle 2,268 The Army has purchased a total of 2,268 G-Wagons to partially replace the Land Rover Perentie. There are eight G-Wagon variants including several in a specialized 6X6 configuration, including Mobile Command Post, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, and Ambulance.[19][20][21] Some 4X4 variants are transportable by the RAAF's Alenia C-27J Spartan battlefield airlifters.
RMMV HX 45M 28 Camo.jpg  Germany Tactical military trucks 2,536 In July 2013, Rheinmetall MAN Military Vehicles (RMMV) Australia was awarded the contract for Project Land 121 (Overlander) Phase 3B. The contract is understood to have a value of AUD1.58 billion (USD1.2 billion) and called for the delivery of 2,536 medium and heavy HX and SX range trucks (later just HX), with deliveries running from 2016 and concluding in 2020. The complete order, which included 1,063 protected trucks, is made up of about 1,600 medium trucks with 4,000 to 6,000 kg payloads, about 800 heavy trucks, most with 15,000 kg payloads and some tank transporters, and just less than 100 recovery vehicles to support the fleet. Overall total and fleet breakdown have revised slightly from those stated at award date. Under a separate AUD400 million contract, 1,799 trailers will be supplied by Australian company Haulmark Trailers.

The first vehicles left RMMV's Vienna plant in July 2015. The first customer handover occurred on 7 April 2016 when six HX77 and six HX40M (plus 70 trailers) were handed over. As part of the award, RMMV Australia will also deliver almost 3,000 modules, with local partners including Sea Box Australia, which will deliver more than 2,100 flatracks for the ILHS system; Varley Group, which will supply more than 550 stores/maintenance modules; Holmwood Highgate, which will supply 276 tankers as well as water and fuel modules; and RPC Technologies, which will provide interface units for Australia's GDELS Ribbon Bridge and support boats, deliveries of which commenced in March 2018, and will conclude by September 2018.[22] Rheinmetall announced on 25 July that Australia had awarded it the LAND 121 Phase 5B contract. RMMVA will deliver more than 1000 logistics trucks and more than 800 modules to the ADF under the new program, which is an extension of the current LAND 121 Phase 3B Project. Deliveries will start in 2019 and will run to 2024.[23]

HMT Extenda Extenda.jpg  United Kingdom High mobility transporter 31 The Army purchased 31 HMT Extenda MK1 Nary patrol vehicles for use by the Special Air Service Regiment to replace the Long Range Patrol Vehicle to provide armoured protection from IEDs.[24] Its namesake comes from Warrant Officer David Nary who was killed during pre-deployment training in Kuwait for the Iraq War. In addition, 89 HMT Extenda MK2 have been ordered for the 2nd Commando Regiment that will be reconfigurable in four configurations.[25][26][27]
High Mobility Engineer Excavators (HMEE)  United Kingdom Backhoe 2 Acquired under Project NINGAUI in 2011[28]
SPARKS II mine rollers  United Kingdom Mine roller 2 Acquired under Project NINGAUI in 2011[28]Attached to the front of Bushmaster PMV
HUSKY Mark III Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR)  South Africa Vehicle-mounted mine detection 2 Acquired under Project NINGAUI in 2011[28]
HUSKY Mark III Interrogation Arm (IA)  South Africa Vehicle-mounted mine detection 1 Acquired under Project NINGAUI in 2011[28]
John Deere 450J bulldozers Bulldozer 25 [29]

Artillery[edit]

Model Image Origin Type Number Notes
M777 howitzer M777A2 howitzer at the 2018 ADFA Open Day.jpg  United Kingdom 155mm towed howitzer 54 Thirty-five 155 mm M777s were ordered as part of the first phase of the Land 17 project to replace the Army's inventory of towed artillery, with initial deliveries beginning in late 2010.[30] An additional 19 guns were purchased in late 2012 instead of the self-propelled guns previously planned, bringing the total order to 54.

Air defence[edit]

Model Image Origin Type Number Notes
RBS 70 Australian RBS-70 team during Exercise Talisman Sabre 21.jpg  Sweden Short range air defense
Man-portable air-defence system
30 Thirty upgraded RBS-70 short range air defence weapon systems are currently divided between two Air Defence Batteries within the 16th Regiment.[31] More sophisticated Bolide missiles have now been purchased.[32]
NASAMS 2 NASAMS II E.T..JPG  Norway Medium range surface-to-air missile (2 ordered, 6 planned) In April 2017 the Australian Government awarded Raytheon a contract to produce an unspecified number of NASAMS systems for use with the Australian Army.[33] The batteries, mounted on Hawkei PMVs, will be used by the 16th Regiment.[34] 2 batteries were ordered on 21 June 2019[35]

Aircraft[edit]

Model Image Origin Type Number Notes
Airbus Helicopters Tiger ARH ARH Tiger.jpg France France
 Germany
Armed reconnaissance helicopter 22 Modified and upgraded version of the Tiger HAP. The Tiger ARH will be replaced by the Boeing AH-64E Guardian from 2025.[36]
NHIndustries MRH-90 Taipan Australian MRH-90 lands on USS Green Bay (LPD-20) in July 2015.JPG  Germany
 France
 Italy
 Netherlands
Medium lift/utility helicopter 41 (+ 6 joint with Navy)[37] Replaced the UH-1 Iroquois in 2008, and largely replaced the Black Hawks in 2017. Twelve MRH-90 Taipans will receive design changes to be suitable for special operations with 6th Aviation Regiment. These Taipans will enter service with the regiment between 2019-2021 to replace the Black Hawk.[38][39]
UH-60 Black Hawk Australian and US Army helicopter medical rescue exercise in (cropped).jpg United States United States Medium lift/utility helicopter 20 The Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk was the Army's primary battlefield lift/utility helicopter. The helicopters were assembled by Hawker de Havilland. Replaced in utility and transport roles by the MRH-90, with 20 aircraft remaining in service with the 6th Aviation Regiment until 2021 to support special forces missions.[37]
Boeing CH-47F Chinook CH-47F Chinook A15-303 operating with watercraft in June 2018.jpg United States United States Heavy lift helicopter 12 The Chinook can be armed with the 7.62×51mm FN MAG 58 general-purpose machine gun and the 7.62×51mm M134D Minigun.[40] In 2015, seven new CH-47Fs entered service with the Army.[41] In March 2016, an urgent order was placed for three additional CH-47Fs.[42] In 2021, the Army received a further two CH-47Fs with a further delivery of two more to arrive in 2022.[43]
Eurocopter EC135 T2+ Joint Helicopter Aircrew Training School (N52-014) Airbus Helicopter EC135T2+ at Wagga Wagga Airport.jpg  France
 Germany
Training helicopter 15 (joint with Navy)[44] Helicopter Aircrew Training System (HATS) shared with the Navy

Unmanned aerial vehicles[edit]

Model Image Origin Type Number Notes
RQ-7B Shadow 200 USMC-01522.jpg  United States Reconnaissance and battlefield surveillance 10[45] Shadow 200 entered service in 2012 replacing the ScanEagle.[46][47]
RQ-12A Wasp AE  United States Reconnaissance and battlefield surveillance The Wasp entered service in 2014 for test and evaluation.[48] The Wasp AE entered service in 2018.[48]
PD-100 Black Hornet ARMY WARFIGHTING EXPERIMENT 2017 - TESTING THE NEXT GENERATION OF TECHNOLOGY MOD 45162646.jpg  Norway Reconnaissance and battlefield surveillance Black Hornet entered service in 2014 for test and evaluation.[49] In 2017, the Army ordered more than 160.[50]
Phantom 4 DJI Phantom 4Pro 04-2017 img3 in flight.jpg  China Reconnaissance and battlefield surveillance 350 Phantom 4 entered service in 2017.[51]

Watercraft[edit]

Model Image Origin Type Number Notes
LARC-V Australian Army LARC-V in 2013.jpg  United States Amphibious cargo vehicle 15 15 medium size coastal / inland waterway landing craft fitted with 2 x 12.7mm HMG to be in service until 2027.[52][53]
LCM-8 Aust. Army LCM-8.jpg  United States River boat and mechanized landing craft 12 12 to remain in service until 2027. Withdrawn from service in 1993 and reintroduced in 1998 after upgrade.[52][53]

Infantry weapons[edit]

Assault rifles and carbines[edit]

Name Origin Type Calibre Photo Notes
F88 Austeyr  Austria
 Australia
Bullpup assault rifle 5.56×45mm NATO Australian soldier firing an EF88 assault rifle in 2018.jpg A derivative of the Austrian Steyr AUG STG-77 assault rifle. It is the ADF's standard individual weapon, which replaced the L1A1 SLR and the M16A1 rifle from front-line service in the late 1980s. The weapon is manufactured under licence in Australia by Thales Australia (formerly Australian Defence Industries Ltd). Enhanced F88 (EF88), The Latest variant to improve modularity featuring extended accessories rail, a fixed barrel and bolt catch release. 1RAR will begin to re-equip with the EF88 from June 2015 with a wider roll out from 2016.[54] The ADF has ordered 30,000 of these rifles an August 2015,[55] 8,500 on 13 July 2020.[56]
M4 carbine  United States Carbine 5.56×45mm NATO M4 carbine used by Mark Donaldson at the AWM March 2018.jpg Standard issue to Australian special forces units. Its official designation in Australia is the M4A5.[57]
HK416  Germany Assault rifle 5.56×45mm NATO Philippines Soldiers and Australian Special Forces Soldier, clear a room during close quarters battle training in support of Balikatan 2017 at Fort Magsay in Santa Rosa, Nueva Ecija, May 12, 2017 (Cropped).jpg Used by various Australian special forces units.
L1A1 Self-Loading Rifle  Belgium
 United Kingdom
 Australia
Battle rifle 7.62×51mm NATO Tony Abbott inspecting Australias Federation Guard January 2015.jpg Used by the Australian Federation Guard with a bayonet attached for ceremonial purposes only.

Precision rifles[edit]

Name Origin Type Calibre Photo Notes
SR-98  United Kingdom Bolt action sniper rifle 7.62×51mm USMC-110507-M-JG138-004.jpg An Australian variant of the Accuracy International Arctic Warfare, it is the standard-issue sniper rifle in the Australian Army and is chambered for 7.62×51mm. It replaced the Parker Hale Model 82 rifle in the late 1990s. Manufactured under licence in Australia by Thales Australia.
AW50F  United Kingdom Anti-materiel rifle .50 BMG AW50.png The AW50F is the largest-bore variant of the Arctic Warfare sniper rifles suited to the anti-materiel role. It is chambered for the .50 BMG cartridge, and is primarily used with Raufoss Mk211 HEIAP rounds. The AW50F was designed with an Australian-designed and manufactured barrel.
Blaser 93 Tactical 2  Germany Bolt action sniper rifle .338 Lapua Magnum Australian Army soldier sights in before firing a Blaser Tactical 2 Sniper Rifle during exercise Southern Jackaroo at Mount Bundey Training Area, June 17, 2021.jpg A straight-pull bolt-action sniper rifle chambered in .338 Lapua Magnum. Used by special forces and infantry units.
Heckler & Koch HK417  Germany Battle rifle 7.62×51mm NATO Australian soldier with a Heckler & Koch HK417 rifle in Afghanistan during 2013.jpg 'Marksman Rifle System' used by infantry and special forces units to fill the gap between a sniper rifle and 5.56mm derivatives.[58]
SR-25  United States Semi-automatic sniper rifle 7.62×51mm SR-25 pic02.jpg A semi-automatic 7.62×51mm sniper rifle. In service with infantry and special forces units of the Australian Army. It has seen service in Iraq, Afghanistan and East Timor.
Mk 14 Enhanced Battle Rifle (M14 EBR)  United States Designated marksman rifle 7.62×51mm NATO PEO M14 EBR.jpg Used by the Special Air Service Regiment.[59]
Barrett M82  United States Anti-materiel sniper rifle .50 BMG Barrett-M82A1-Independence-Day-2017-IZE-048-white.jpg A semi-automatic sniper and anti-materiel rifle chambered in .50 BMG.[60]

Machine guns[edit]

Name Origin Type Calibre Photo Notes
F89A1 Minimi  Belgium Light machine gun 5.56×45mm NATO An Australian soldier with a F89 light machine gun in 2010.jpg Light machine gun designated the Light Support Weapon (LSW) chambered for 5.56×45mm NATO. The F89 is also manufactured under licence in Australia by Thales Australia. Special forces units use the Para Minimi variant with a shortened barrel and sliding buttstock.
FN Maximi  Belgium Light machine gun 7.62×51mm NATO FN MINIMI Standard Right.jpg The 7.62×51mm NATO model of the Minimi is also in limited service.[61]
FN MAG 58  Belgium General-purpose machine gun 7.62×51mm NATO Australian Army soldier armed with a FN MAG machine gun in Afghanistan during 2010 - cropped.jpg General purpose machine gun designated the General Support Machine Gun (GSMG) chambered for 7.62×51mm NATO. It replaced the M60 machine gun.
Browning M2HB-QCB  United States Heavy machine gun .50 BMG Australian soldier manning a heavy machine gun in a High Mobility Transporter during Talisman Sabre 2019.jpg Heavy machine gun mounted on vehicles.

Pistols[edit]

Name Origin Type Calibre Photo Notes
Self-Loading Pistol 9 millimetre Mark 3  Belgium Semi-automatic pistol 9mm 2 RAR soldier firing a M9 pistol during RIMPAC 2018 - cropped.jpg The Self-Loading Pistol 9 millimetre Mark 3[62] is the standard issue service pistol of the Australian Defence Force, a direct copy of the Browning Hi Power pistol (which has now been discontinued).
Heckler & Koch USP SD  Germany Semi-automatic pistol 9mm HKUSP.png The USP SD is used by special forces units.[63]

Submachine guns[edit]

Name Origin Type Calibre Photo Notes
Heckler & Koch MP5  Germany Submachine gun 9mm MP5.jpg Primarily used by Special forces units in variants MP5K, MP5KA1, MP5A3 and MP5SD3.

Shotguns[edit]

Name Origin Type Calibre Photo Notes
Remington Model 870 and 870P[64]  United States Shotgun 12-gauge Remington M870 12 Gauge.jpg Used by both Special Forces and Military Police personnel. It is also used in specific roles within the infantry.

Grenade launchers[edit]

Name Origin Type Calibre Photo Notes
M203 grenade launcher  United States Grenade launcher 40×46mm Austeyr F88 M203.JPEG Attaches to the F88 (RM Equipment M203PI) and M4 (Colt M203-A1) rifles.
Mk 47 Striker LWAGL  United States Automatic grenade launcher 40×53mm MK47.jpg Mk 47 Mod 1 Lightweight Automatic Grenade Launcher (LWAGL) fitted with Lightweight Video Sight (LVS2) sighting system. It replaced the Mk 19 AGL entering service in 2016.[65]

Anti-armour[edit]

Name Origin Type Calibre Photo Notes
66mm Short-Range Anti-Armour Weapon (M72 LAW)  United States Anti-tank rocket launcher 66mm M72A2 LAW.png A single shot disposable anti-armour weapon.
84mm Carl Gustav Medium Direct Fire Support Weapon (MDFSW)  Sweden Recoilless rifle 84mm Carl Gustav M4 Kokonaisturvallisuus 2015.jpg Primarily used in the anti-armour role. The Army operates the M3 version.[66] The Army has purchased 600 of the latest version the M4 with first deliveries received in 2021.[66][67] The M4 will be rolled out over five years. An M3 will be replaced when it reaches its ten year life span.[66] The Army has yet to procure a fire control system for the M4.[66] The M2 version will be retained for training.[66]
Javelin Anti-Tank Guided Missile (ATGM)  United States Guided anti-armour missile 127mm An Australian soldier carrying two Javelin missiles to a firing point at the Besmaya Range Complex, Iraq, in October 2016.jpg Prior to deploying to Afghanistan in 2001 the Special Air Service Regiment was equipped with the Javelin.[68] It entered service in 2006 with infantry and cavalry units.[69]

Mortars[edit]

Name Origin Type Calibre Photo Notes
M252A1 Mortar  United States Mortar 81mm M252A1 81mm mortar.jpg 176 M252A1 81mm Lightweight Mortars were purchased together with the M32A1 Lightweight Handheld Mortar Ballistic Computer to replace the F2 81mm mortar.[70][71] The M252A1 entered service in 2019.[70][71]
M224A1 Mortar  United States Mortar 60mm M224A1 60mm Mortar.jpg The M224A1 60mm Lightweight Mortar is used by special forces units and will be in service with 2 RAR amphibious light infantry battalion.[72]

Grenades and anti personnel mines[edit]

Name Origin Type Detonation Photo Notes
F1 fragmentation hand grenade  Australia Fragmentation grenade Fuse Australian Army soldiers throw a grenade RIMPAC Exercise 2014.JPG Manufactured by Thales Australia. It has a lethal range of 6 m (20 ft) and has a fuse time of 4.5 to 5.5 seconds.
M18A1 Claymore Antipersonnel Mine  United States Anti-personnel mine Remote US M18a1 claymore mine.jpg It is called an "Anti-Personnel Device" due to the Commonwealth of Australia agreeing not to use mines of any type.[citation needed]

Bayonets[edit]

Name Origin Type Photo Notes
M9 Bayonet  Australia Bayonet Bayonet-Knife M9 w Scabbard.jpg The Army's primary combat knife used by all personnel and can be attached on the F88 Austeyr and the M4 carbine.

Combat uniform of the Australian Army[edit]

Soldier with F88A2 rifle wearing Australian Multicam Pattern Operational Combat Uniform

There are two major combat uniforms worn by the Army, they are:

  • Australian Multicam Camouflage Uniform – AMCU is the standard combat uniform with a camouflage pattern derived from Crye Precision MultiCam using a colour palette and shapes based on the previous Disruptive Pattern Camouflage Uniform (DPCU).[73][74] The AMCU was initially issued in late 2014 to 3rd Brigade with a final design roll out commencing in January 2016.[75][76] Uniforms in Multicam pattern had been adopted in 2009 starting with the Crye Precision Combat Uniform (CPCU) issued to special forces (Special Operations Task Group) in Afghanistan which was later issued to Mentoring Task Force close-combatant units. Domestically and in other Peacekeeping exercises the standard DPCU was worn. The CPCU was replaced in 2012 by the Australian Multicam Pattern - Operational Combat Uniform (AMP-OCU) made in Australia with a specially designed pattern for Afghanistan. The CPCU and the AMP-OCU had replaced the Disruptive Pattern Desert Uniform (DPDU). The DPDU was an Australian made and designed uniform issued in 2001 for Afghanistan and was later worn in Iraq with the design refined twice.[77]
  • Disruptive Pattern Camouflage Uniform – DPCU had been the standard combat uniform for the Army following its roll out in 1987 to replace the jungle green uniform.[78][77] In 2005, the DPCU-NIR was released with Near-infrared (NIR) Signature Management Camouflage.[79][76] The DPCU is being replaced by the AMCU.[73]

Future equipment[edit]

Infantry weapons[edit]

The Army has begun to roll out their new state of the art rifle, the Enhanced F88 (EF88). The new rifle has several new features including improved modularity featuring extended accessories rail, a fixed barrel, bolt catch release and a black paint scheme. It was confirmed in July 2015 that the contract for 30,000 EF88 rifles had been approved with full roll out starting in 2016. 2,500 Steyr Mannlicher SL40 grenade launchers have also been ordered.[80]

The Army had previously planned on replacing the F88 with the Advanced Individual Combat Weapon (AICW) by 2010–2012. The most notable feature of the AICW is a grenade launcher with 3 stacked rounds that uses electricity to fire off the grenade. The AICW had aimed to provide the infantry soldier with the ability to fire multiple grenades without having to reload, and to switch between 5.56 mm ballistic rounds and 40 mm grenades without changing sights, trigger or stance, giving the operator more versatility and reduced reaction times in combat.[citation needed] The AICW has all but disappeared from the Army's sights and it is unlikely to ever make a return. The company responsible for the ACIW, Metal Storm Limited was placed in voluntary administration in 2012.[81]

Armoured vehicles[edit]

In December 2011, the Thales Hawkei PMV (Protected Military Vehicle) was selected as the preferred tender for the Army's requirement of a light 4x4 armored car with a potential order for 1300 vehicles.[82] The seven-tonne Hawkei has been described as a 'baby' variant of the Bushmaster[83] having been developed by the same manufacturer.

Under LAND 400 the ASLAV and M113s will be replaced, with the project to acquire a Combat Reconnaissance Vehicle (CRV), an Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV), a Manoeuvre Support Vehicle (MSV) and an Integrated Training System (ITS). The ASLAV fleet is planned to be replaced from 2020, and the M113s from 2025.[84] On 19 February 2015 the tender was opened for the replacement of the ASLAV, listing a requirement for up to 225 armored vehicles to provide the future mounted combat reconnaissance capability.[85] The remaining requirements of the project will be confirmed by the upcoming Defence White Paper; however, it is expected to include an infantry fighting vehicle—a capability currently only partly provided by the in-service M113AS4 Armoured Personnel Carrier—as well as a manoeuvre support vehicle, and an integrated training system.[86] The project is valued at more than $10 billion and is expected to acquire approximately 700 vehicles.[87]

Under LAND 907 Phase 2 the M1A1 Abrams will be upgraded to the M1A2. In September 2020, Army reported that the M1A1 would upgraded through replacement. The M1A2 variant was to be either the M1A2 System Enhancement Package (SEP) V3 or a custom Australian variant. The chosen variant would be fitted with bespoke armour. The tanks were to be delivered in 2025.[2] The government forecast $8-11.9 billion for replacement evaluation and design in the Force Structure Plan 2020.[88] In April 2021, the US granted Australia a potential US$1.685 billion Foreign Military Sale (FMS) of 75 M1A2 SEPv3 Abrams and six M88A2 Hercules recovery vehicles. Under Land 8160 Phase 1, the deal also revives the Army's Combat Engineering Vehicle capability lost with the Leopard tanks with twenty-nine M1150 Assault Breacher Vehicles and eighteen M1074 Joint Assault Bridges.[3][89] The Defence department did not release a press release regarding the FMS.[90]

Aircraft[edit]

The Army is reorganising its aviation element, through the purchase of 22 ARH Tiger attack helicopters and 30 MRH 90 Taipan utility helicopters (30 helicopters out of a total purchase of 46, which will be divided between Army, Fleet Air Arm and a joined MRH 90 training base). Furthermore, 7 CH-47F Chinook heavy lift helicopters will be purchased to replace the Army's five remaining CH-47D Chinook helicopters. In addition, the Army will also acquire a number of UAVs (including a number of Boeing ScanEagles and 18 RQ-7 Shadow) which will equip the 20th Surveillance and Target Acquisition Regiment, at Enoggera Barracks, Queensland.[91] Smaller UAVs being trialed include the AeroVironment Wasp III and Black Hornet Nano.[92]

Previously it was planned that the MRH-90 would eventually replace all of the Army's Black Hawks, with the Black Hawk fleet planned to be reduced to 18 operational aircraft in 2014–15 as part of the phased withdrawal of the type from service.[93] However, in December 2015 it was announced that 20 Black Hawks will remain in service with the 6th Aviation Regiment until the end of 2021 to provide aviation support to special forces.[37]

Summary[edit]

This list includes equipment currently on order or a requirement which has been identified:

  • A replacement for the Tiger ARH helicopter was identified in the 2016 Defence White Paper.[94] In January 2021, the Boeing AH-64E Guardian helicopter was selected to replace the ARH Tiger from 2025.[36]
  • A new deployable short-range ground-based air defence missile system is slated to replace the RBS-70 MANPADS by the early 2020s.[95]
  • Land-based anti-ship missiles were outlined as a new requirement in the 2016 Defence White Paper to defend deployed forces as well as offshore assets such as oil and natural gas platforms.[95][96]
  • The Australian Government committed to improving the systems that individual soldiers use. Items outlined in the DWP include "weapons and targeting equipment, digital communications systems, body armour and self protection equipment (including for chemical, biological and radiological threats), and night fighting equipment."[97]
  • 1,100 Hawkei protected mobility vehicles are currently being procured at a cost of around $1.3 billion.[98]
  • The Bushmaster PMV is to be replaced beginning in 2025 by a new platform.[99]
  • LAND 400 phase 2 replacement program is set to replace the existing 257 ASLAVs with 211 Boxers.[100]
  • LAND 400 phase 3 replacement program is set to replace 431 M113AS3/4 APCs.
  • LAND 907 phase 2 replacement program is set to replace the M1A1 Abrams with M1A2s.[101][2]
  • Long-range rocket artillery and missile system.[102][99] In July 2021, the Army became a partner in the US Precision Strike Missile (PrSM) program that is developing a surface-to-surface precision-strike guided missile with a range of over 400 kilometres (250 mi).[103][104] The system to be acquired to fire it has yet to be named, however, the US Army reports that the PrSM will be able to fired from the M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System and the M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket System.[103]
  • A riverine patrol capability is to be re-established in 2022. The capability will be established around a fleet of small, lightly armed patrol vessels to allow access to a range of different environments.[99][105]
  • The Army has outlined a need for enhanced intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capability. With this, they plan to acquire a fleet of armed, medium-range unmanned aerial vehicles along with regular capability updates. They will provide enhanced firepower and ISR as well as a counter-terrorism ability overseas. They will also assist in humanitarian and relief missions.[99]
  • 30 AS9 Huntsman 155mm self-propelled howitzers based on the South Korean Hanwha K9 Thunder together with 15 AS10 Armoured Ammunition Resupply Vehicles (AARV) to be built in Geelong in Victoria with deliveries expected in 2025.[102][106][107][108]

References[edit]

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